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Pendleton at #Sundance

If you could be anywhere this weekend, would you choose the Sundance Film Festival?

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Here we are (courtesy of a Vulture  tweet). Jay-Z’s Tidal is dressing their sets with our blankets-that’s the Silver Bark blanket in the middle, with Rainier and Glacier on each side.

Another shot from @benjaminbratt

We also showed up in the @applegate lounge with a national parks Motor Robe:

A coat made from one of our Chief Joseph blankets is worn by Water Defender LaDonna Bravebull, who is tirelessly getting the message out at the festival.

You can't drink oil, keep it in the soil. LaDonna Bravebull. Badass. Standing Rock. #sundancefilmfestival

A photo posted by Cassian Elwes (@cassianelwes) on

We hope Pendleton blankets have been helping people stay warm in North Dakota.

If you spot more shots of Pendleton at Sundance, let us know, will you? Stay warm, everyone. And remember, our blankets are proudly made in the USA.

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Pendleton Mill Tribute Series: J. Capps and Sons – 1892 to 1917

 

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The last mill in our series of blankets paying tribute to the Golden Age of the Trade blanket is the J. Capps and Sons Woolen Mill of Jacksonville, Illinois.

Our friend Barry Friedman, the foremost historian and scholar of Native American Trade blankets, has concluded that the very first blankets for the Native trade were manufactured by J. Capps and Sons in 1892. Barry has come to this conclusion through painstaking research that only a truly obsessed person would perform, so we trust his findings.

j-cappsmill1865The J. Capps & Sons Woolen Mill in 1865

Joseph Capps arrived in Jacksonville, Illinois in 1839, only 21 years after Illinois became a state. He opened a wool-carding business, to which he would add spinning machines, looms and other weaving machines to become a fully operational weaving mill. As his business grew, so did his family; sons Stephen, William and Joseph would become partners in the firm, and carried on the business after Joseph’s death in 1872.

The Capps & Sons mill produced plain bed blankets, men’s suitings and other woolen goods throughout its years of operation. They also produced blanket overcoats.

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Production of the Trade blanket ceased in 1917, when the mill’s production was diverted to the needs of WWI.

The first sales records of “Indian blankets” appears in Capps’ business records in 1892. In 1893, the blankets are first mentioned in their marketing materials. The company apparently operated under three names: J. Capps & Sons, Ltd., the Jacksonville Woolen Mills, the American Indian Blanket Mills. Despite the name, at no time were Native Americans involved in the design or weaving of these blankets. The patterns were mostly designed by Portuguese weavers who worked at the mill.

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For our Mill Tribute series, we reproduced seven J. Capps & Sons, Ltd. designs. Capps designs remain much the same through their decades of production, and they produced surprisingly few patterns over that time. The designs make little use of the curvilinear abilities of the jacquard loom, keeping to “straight-line” patterns. To quote Barry: “With no other company that produced Indian blankets over so long a time do we see the continuity of design and pattern…A Capps blanket from 1915 looks very much like a Capps blanket from the 1890s.”

And again, we wish to make it clear that while Native Americans were enthusiastic customers for these elegant blankets, they were not involved in the design or manufacture of these patterns. The Capps names are listed for reference only.

Capps 1 – retired

We chose a rarity for our very first Capps tribute blanket. It is unnamed and uncatalogued in the Capps literature, but was sold in at least three color combinations. The original of this bold and beautiful version was produced circa 1910.

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Capps 2 – retired

Capps referred to this as the “Cheyenne Basket pattern, a Riot of Color.” You can see it over the arm of the woman in the ad above.

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Capps 3 – retired

Capps called this the Shoshone pattern, and the orginal version is a favorite among collectors.

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Capps 4 – retired

This bright design was called “A Typical Moqui” by Capps.

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Capps 5 – retired

An exciting pattern done in traditional colors, this was a consumer favorite in our Mill Tribute series. In the Capps catalog, it is called the “Kiowa Rattlesnake” pattern.

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Capps 6available here

Another rarity provided this pattern, called “Navajo” in the Capps literature.

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Capps 7 – Available here

For our final Capps tribute, we chose the pattern they called “Papago.” The original Capps version is a favorite among collectors of vintage trade blankets for its graphic boldness and overall symmetry.

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Our thanks to Barry Friedman for his research and writing. You can learn so much more about the Native American Trade Blanket from Barry’s books:

Chasing Rainbows

Still Chasing Rainbows

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Thank you, Everyone: Your Gift to the National Parks.

Throughout 2016, we have been donating a portion of the proceeds from all our National Park Collection merchandise to the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks, to help support restoration and preservation of two historic national park landmarks. All of our National Park Collection collaboration partners have donated as well. This means that with  every purchase you’ve made, you’ve also made a donation!

“Every single dollar that was donated through your purchases makes a big difference for these incredible gems in our national parks and the people who visit them,” said Susan Newton, Senior Vice President of Grants and Programs at the National Park Foundation. “Ensuring that our national parks and historic sites are preserved well into the future is a responsibility that we proudly share with you, and we are grateful to partners like Pendleton for supporting this goal.”

Take a look at the two projects you’re helping to make possible:

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Many Glacier Hotel, Glacier National Park 

Many Glacier, a beautiful Swiss style lodge nestled in an unparalleled mountain panorama in Glacier National Park, is often called the most photogenic of the great National Park Lodges. Pendleton’s contribution is supporting the restoration of the historic lobby of the Many Glacier Hotel, including rebuilding of the helical stairway.

Many Glacier Hotel’s helical stairs were completed in 1917 as the hotel’s showpiece. The grand helix-shaped staircase led to a magnificent upper-floor lake view, but was removed in the 1950s, along with historic lighting fixtures. The removal of the staircase and lighting fixtures led to the gradual degradation of the historic character of this renowned National Historic Landmark.

Nikki Eisinger, Director of Development, Glacier National Park Conservancy, said of the project, “Many Glacier reflects majestically over Swiftcurrent Lake and is often referred to as ‘The Lady’ in our park.  To recreate the historic look and feel of The Lady has been an incredible undertaking. We are so grateful for the support to make these renovations possible.  When the replica of her original iconic helical stairway is installed this spring, and the lobby restoration is complete, we will have truly done this architectural gem a huge historic favor, having restored her to her original grandeur.”

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Grand Canyon Train Depot, Grand Canyon National Park

The Grand Canyon Train Depot in Grand Canyon Village is one of the park’s “front doors,” serving as a major arrival point for thousands of visitors each year and used as a meeting place for adventurers for over 100 years. This National Historic Landmark is one of the park’s most-photographed man made structures. Pendleton’s contributions are helping improve accessibility and preserve the character of this popular landmark for the future.

“The depot is currently open and currently operated by Grand Canyon Railroad,” said Craig Chenevert of Grand Canyon National Park. “The project is quite extensive, and with support from Pendleton we will begin the process to update the depot’s Historic Structure Report. This document will include an updated and prioritized treatment plan that will inform the sequence of future work.”

Progress! It’s thanks to you.

And the helical stairs? Well, just look!

many-glacier-hotel-restoration-img1The Many Glacier Hotel Lobby is being returned to its original and curious decor. Louis Hill’s vision of an East-meets-West style, with Japanese lanterns and log lodge architecture, designed to lure tourists to experience Glacier National Park via the Great Northern Express, will be re-created.

many-glacier-hotel-restoration-img2This photo shows where the floor of the Lobby was filled in over 50 years ago after the removal of the original double helix staircase. By the opening of the hotel next June, the staircase replica will be installed in this spot, and the lobby will be more like it appeared for the first half of The Lady’s life.

It’s really something to see that old footprint for the stairs revealed, isn’t it? A piece of history that will soon be functional and fantastic.

Photo Credit: Glacier National Park Conservancy

Native American Inspiration: The Peaceful Ones and Gift of the Earth

Two of our 2017 blankets are inspired by Hopi culture.

“Hopi” is a shortened form of Hopituh Shi-nu-mu, or, “The Peaceful Ones.” The Hopi reservation covers almost 2.5 million acres of northeastern Arizona, near the Four Corners area east of the Grand Canyon. The Hopi reservation is completely surrounded by the Navajo reservation. Its 14 villages sit on three rocky mesas; First Mesa, Second Mesa, and Third Mesa. The Hopis have lived here for over a thousand years. They follow a yearlong calendar of rituals and ceremonies, and carefully maintain their traditions.

The first blanket is our newest American Indian College Fund blankets, Gift of the Earth, which celebrates Hopi pottery.

Gift of the Earth

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The Hopi have a sacred relationship with the ancient caretaker of the earth, Masaw, and respect every gift given to them. The clay they and their ancestors have sourced from the land for centuries is treated with the utmost regard. Because of this, the Hopi people maintain a beautiful and unique pottery tradition on the mesas in Arizona. Craftsmanship and creativity drawn from generations of knowledge flow through the potters today as they work. This blanket draws on the design elements from these brilliant pieces as a testament to learning from the past while moving into the future.

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(source – photo by Holly Chervnsik)

Interesting facts about Hopi pottery:

  • The golden hues of early Hopi pottery might have sparked the tales of fantastic wealth that lured early Spaniards to the Seven Cities of Cibola.
  • Smooth, symmetrical vessels might appear to be wheel-thrown, but are formed by hand through “coil and scrape.”
  • The most common shapes are shallow bowls and flat-shouldered jars.
  • Paints are made from natural materials, such as tansy mustard and beeweed.
  • Hopi pottery is open-fired with sheep dung and cedar.
  • Today, most pottery is made on First Mesa.

Like all our College Fund blankets, sales of Gift of the Earth help support scholarships to Native American Scholars. Learn more here: The College Fund

Our second Hopi-inspired blanket for 2017 is The Peaceful Ones.

The Peaceful Ones

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They call themselves Hopi, a shortened version of their true name: Hopituh Shi-nu-mu, the Peaceful Ones. Members of this Southwest nation follow the Hopi Way, based on the instructions of Maasaw, the Creator and Caretaker of Earth. The Peaceful Ones strive to be mannered, polite, and peaceable in all interactions. Their path will eventually lead to a state of complete reverence for all things. This design is based on an embroidered Manta, the garment worn by Hopi women in ceremonies that follow the lunar calendar. Through their traditional ceremonies, the Peaceful Ones hope to bring tranquility and harmony to the entire world.

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Interesting facts about the manta:

  • The manta is a rectangular cloth, fastened at the right shoulder and held by a sash.
  • Mantas were originally woven of undyed cotton. Over time, dyed threads and geometric patterns added beauty to the garment’s simple shape.
  • The practice of wearing blouses or shift dresses under mantas came much later, under pressure from missionaries.
  • Once the everyday wear of Navajo, Pueblo and Hopi women, the manta is now worn during important ceremonies.

We are excited to be sharing these blankets soon at  www.pendleton-usa.com.

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National Parks Memories: Babies

We are closing out this fantastic year of celebration with some more national Park memories. These two memories come from Pendleton employees.

Erin is one of our designers. She has this to say about this photo:

Although I don’t remember this, it is a popular story at family get gatherings. This is a picture of me at the Grand Canyon with my mother (Nancy) and aunt (JoAnn). I am recovering from a massive tantrum because my mother would not release me from her toddler hiking backpack. I really wanted to cross the guard rail to get a better look at the Grand Canyon! Obviously my request was not met and I went into a hysterical crying tantrum.

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And, for our last post of the year, here’s a classic shot given to us by Robin, who is head of our bricks-and-mortar stores division:

Timberline Lodge on Mount Hood:  The year was 1957, I was 4.5 years old.  I was visiting my West coast grandparents from New York with my New York City grandmother, Rose Raskin in the Pendleton 49’er jacket, my mother, Mary Bonetta,  and little sister Hillary, age 2. I recall only the gift shop, where I was to receive a totem pole.  Who knew then I would work for Pendleton 45+ years later.  Wish I had that 49’er jacket!

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Two wonderful memories, two fabulous photos and two babies for the New Year.

Happy New Year from Pendleton Woolen Mills!

 

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A Park Memory: Susan Karlstrom for Glacier National Park

Ed. note: Please enjoy this special customer memory from Susan Karlstrom. It’s a special one!

For Christmas this year my husband gave me the Glacier National Park 100th Anniversary blanket.  It’s beautiful with the profile of the Garden wall, as seen from Lake McDonald.  This is the view from my favorite spot on Earth.  The west end of the lake.

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My father was a naturalist for the park. As a child, the day after school was out we hit the road, Michigan to Montana in 3 days.  We had to get to the park to start our summer.

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My brother and I “grew up” in Glacier.  No tv, no phone, just outside and everything the park had to offer.  Woods, trails, streams, rivers, snow, bears, that was our summer adventure.

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My mother was confident in our “bear skills” and always knew we would come home when hungry.  We always did.  Now, I sit with my Glacier park blanket, in Michigan, and tell my children of my incredible experiences in Glacier. I am fortunate that my family wants to return with me to Glacier I and explore it together.

 

I still get a feeling deep in me that says it’s time to go back and to see, smell and feel Glacier, to reconnect with the park.   Fortunately, my husband is ready to go.   Now, my kids look at me and say it’s time to go back.  I could not agree more.  I am thankful it’s in them.

I am thankful that this beautiful blanket keeps us warm and keeps us planning for the next trip to Glacier this summer! The blanket is so special to me.  Someday, I know I will wrap my grandchildren in it and foster their love for Glacier too. Thank you for creating it!

Susan Karlstrom

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See the blanket here: Glacier National Park 100th Anniversary Blanket

What to Buy on Free Shipping Day

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Everything ships free today only—free 2-3 day shipping in time for Christmas with code HURRY—so now’s your chance to score some last-minute gifts and stocking stuffers! Think of free shipping as the best excuse ever to avoid the crowds and stay snuggled on the couch. So pour some more eggnog, turn up the holiday music, and use this cheat sheet for the best Pendleton gifts to snag today—including a few for you.

Friends of the Parks Bracelet, $5

The perfect stocking stuffer! Your outdoorsy friends and family will love them. (Our stores have trouble keeping these in stock.) In the same hues as Pendleton’s park stripe blankets, it’s a fun little pop of color to show your support for America’s national parks.

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Oversized Mug, $19.50

A big, sturdy ceramic mug to last forever (and a mainstay on Pendleton employee desks). Choose from seven different park stripes, 10 iconic blanket patterns and more.

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Long Fringed Scarf, $54.99 & up

Brr, it’s chilly out! Keep warm with luxe merino wool and classic Pendleton patterns. There’s a matching hat too to complete your winter-ready ensemble.

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National Park Socks, $12.50

These comfy cushioned socks are another affordable pick from Pendleton’s National Park Collection. (2016 is the centennial of the National Park Service.) Raves one customer, “They are the most comfortable socks I’ve had in a long time!”

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Fleece-Lined Headband, $19.50

Everyone knows someone so dedicated to exercise that they jog even when it’s freezing cold. Give them the gift of stylish winter warmth with this fleece-lined headband.

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Jacquard Leggings, $26.70

Who says you can’t get something for yourself during the holidays? Pair these leggings in coral or lavender with a tunic for casual pizazz, or wear them with your coziest sweatshirt and lounge around.

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Pueblo Cross Crew Socks, $14.50

Another sure-to-please stocking stuffer. These red-and-aqua socks come in an exclusive Pendleton pattern inspired by Southwestern geo designs. There’s a matching bandana too.

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See more Pendleton gifts here. Happy Free Shipping Day!

 

STAR WARS: Rogue One Instagram Contest On The Way!

We are celebrating the release of Star Wars: Rogue One with a blanket giveaway on Instagram. It begins Thursday, December 15 at Noon (12 pm) Pacific Standard Time, and runs until Midnight on Sunday night–also Pacific Standard Time.

To enter, follow us on Instagram if you don’t already! If you are already a follower, you’ve met the first requirement without even trying.

Next, find our Instagram post of this image:

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In a comment on this exact post, leave a comment tagging at least one of your friends who are also on Instagram. Remember, tag your friends on Instagram, not this blog.

That’s it! You’ll be entered. You don’t even have to mention how intriguing the blanket is, or how excited you are to see Star Wars: Rogue One (though, like us, you probably can’t wait). Just an Instagram handle will do the job.

Winner will be chosen randomly on Monday, December 19th, with notification soon after.

The Star Wars: Rogue One blanket is BEAUTIFUL! Here’s a flat shot:

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Dark silhouettes hint at the mysterious heroes at the heart of Rogue One, the latest chapter of the Star Wars saga. This limited edition Pendleton blanket gives you a sneak peek at new characters Jyn Erso and Captain Cassian Andor, as well as the droid K-2SO, the tropical planet of Scarif–and is that Darth Vader and the Death Star in the distance?

Bands of green reflect the film’s muted palette, while geometric shapes add a distinctive finishing touch. The intricate and reversible design is made possible by Pendleton’s state-of-the-art looms and weaving expertise. Exclusive Pendleton design. Hand-numbered edition of 1,977 with a custom Star Wars label and Certificate of Authenticity.

 

OFFICIAL RULES Read more

Isabelle Huppert in Pendleton for the New York Times

isabelle-huppert-slide-h1z7-superjumboWe were delighted to see French actress Isabelle Huppert in the New York Times style magazine, wearing our Frankie shirt. Huppert is known for her intelligence, beauty and insistence on challenging roles. Her career spans 45 years and over 100 roles.

You can read more about her controversial new movie with provocative director Paul Verhoeven here: NYT Interview with Isabelle Huppert

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And see the shirt here (Huppert is wearing the Black Watch): Frankie Shirt by Pendleton

Greg Hatten visits Badlands National Park

img_4280Ed. note: Our friend Greg Hatten took a small detour to Badlands on his way home from Oregon this year. And since our #pendle10park explorer has shown us so many photos of spires and stacks, we thought we’d share Greg’s beautiful prairie shots, as the prairie is a huge part of this beautiful South Dakota park. Enjoy!

In the Badlands National Park, there is a Wilderness Area where bison, coyotes, prairie dogs, and snakes make their homes. You can be a guest there and share this space with them – at least for a night or two.

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Look closely; there be prairie dogs in this photo.

img_4291We love the bison here, but we also love the national park stickers on Greg’s windshield. These were an enticement to the early motorists traveling from park to park. Like this (this is not Greg, though):

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Now, back to Greg’s story in the present day.

It’s the primitive camping area at Sage Creek in the North Unit of the park and if you take the rutted dusty “rim road” on the north side of the Badlands park you will find it – tucked between the gentle bluffs and rolling hills of buffalo grass in South Dakota – just southeast of Rapid City and the Black Hills.

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As I pulled into the area, it was a warm day for October and the only signs of life were a couple of bison calmly grazing who didn’t even look up as I rolled by in my FJ Cruiser pulling my little wooden boat. A ring-necked rooster pheasant was quite a bit more shy but still curious about the sound of loose gravel crunching beneath the tires. My window was down and I took a quick photo just before he put his head down and disappeared in the tall grass.

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While there are no rivers to “float” in the Badlands, I was towing my boat through the park on my way to the midwest for a little off-season repair work. I’m so used to camping next to the boat on the river, it somehow seemed to “fit” in this rustic setting. If nothing else, I figured it would be a nice wind break for my campsite. I picked a level spot for the tent that was in-between buffalo “pies” that were stale and crusty and no longer smelled. The canvas tent blended with the terrain and when camp was “set”, I pulled out my lap-top and did some late afternoon writing as the sun set and the temperatures started dropping.

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Greg’s post has a lot of beautiful photos and much more story. Read the rest here: Find Your Park in a Wooden Boat: Badlands

See Pendleton’s Badlands National Park items here: SHOP BADLANDS

 

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