Artist profile: Full Moon Lodge by Starr Hardridge

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Pendleton’s Full Moon Lodge blanket is based on a painting by Starr Hardridge, an esteemed artist who earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Savannah College of Art and Design in 1997, with further training in France and Italy. He is a registered member of the Muskogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma.

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Hardridge has exhibited at the Grand Palais as part of the Delegation Amerindienne in Paris, and took first place honors at the Santa Fe Art Market. In 2005, he earned the title of Superieur de Peinture Decorative from the Nadai-Verdon Atelier of Decorative Arts. Painting provides a deep link to his personal history. As he says, “My heart is in my art.”

He’s worked in several styles, with newer work using a technique based on pointillism and the beadwork aesthetic of the southeastern woodland nations. The colors and shapes in his newer work are inspiring. You can see his portfolio here: Starr Hardridge

When translating art into weavings, designers face challenges, especially in terms of the numbers of colors we are able to include. The vivid dyes of our wool captured the hues of the original painting; the drama that results from pairing blue and orange is striking. And the reverse is just as exciting!

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The design illustrates the relationship between mankind, Mother Nature and the creator of the universe whose medicine is love. It acknowledges our place between the sun and the full moon.

Full Moon Lodge is part of our Legendary Collection.

See more of these special blankets here: LEGENDARY BLANKETS

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Supporting Fisher House in honor of Veterans Day

In honor of Veterans Day: purchase one of three special blankets honoring veterans and we’ll donate 10% to the Fisher House Foundation to help military families. You can learn more about this non-profit’s important mission here: https://www.fisherhouse.org

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Here are the blankets that will help support this important mission–and remember, the Grateful Nation blanket generates donations year-round.

Grateful Nation

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The fabric of our nation is woven with the sacrifices of our veterans. This USA-made wool blanket honors the selfless service of these brave men and women. Centered on the blanket is a representation of the American flag. Each stripe represents a service ribbon awarded to veterans of historical conflicts from World War II on, and stars represent the 50 states, District of Columbia and five US territories. A portion of all sales of this blanket will be donated to the Fisher House™ Foundation, a nonprofit organization providing residences for the families of ill or wounded service members.

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Brave Star

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This contemporary interpretation of the American flag is a celebration of the patriotism of Native Americans. In 1875 Indian scouts carried messages from fort to fort in the West. Native American soldiers saw action with Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders in Cuba. And soldiers from many tribes battled in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf and Iraq. Five Native Americans have been awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery “above and beyond the call of duty.” The design marries modern asymmetry and vintage Americana. The unique striations, using pulled out yarns, reflect an era when dyes were made from plants.

Mountain Majesty

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Inspired by Navajo hand weaving created in the Southwest in the early 20th century, this pattern incorporates symbols of hope, abundance and successful journeys. Muted colors and mountain-like steps evoke sunset over a western landscape.

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See all three the blankets here: http://bit.ly/2T1sNVu

Read more about our work with Fisher House here: FISHER HOUSE

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Artist profile: In Their Element by Joe Toledo

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In Their Element is a blanket in the Pendleton Legendary series, created from an original watercolor painting by artist Joe Toledo.

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Eagle feathers and bison are sacred symbols in Native American culture. Navajo artist Joe Toledo uses these symbols in his painting, “In Their Element,” representing three elements; Earth, Air and Water. A herd of bison graze on the Earth, offering prosperity and protection. A range of mountains towers above the herd, their snowy peaks covered with life-giving Water. Standing Eagle feathers rise into the sky, joining together Earth, Water and Air, and carrying Eagle’s spirit to a place of strength above the clouds.

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One of the most arresting details of this design is found in the line created by mountain peaks passing behind the white portion of the eagle feathers.  Looking closely, you can see that they work continuously to create the snowy peaks of the mountain range.

Mr. Toledo is a native of Jemez Pueblo in New Mexico. He currently lives in Tiffany, Colorado, with his wife, Ann. He enjoys working in watercolor because it is “spontaneous and unpredictable.” Mr. Toledo mixes soft rainwater with his paints, for colors that reflect the colors and images of his home landscape. His works are exhibited in collections in the United States, Canada and Europe.

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According to Mr. Toledo, “…as an American Indian, the bison are symbols of cultural enrichment. There was a traditional ceremony at the killing of the buffalo, so the animal was respected. Bison represent strength, power and protection, assurance, and strength.”

Several years back, Mr. Toledo designed another blanket with us, Buffalo Roam. His exceptional studies of buffalo are based on watching, sketching and painting a Great Northern bison that lives on his property.

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Buffalo Roam

The buffalo was revered by many Native American tribes. The meat gave them food. The hides provided robes for warmth, tepee covers for shelter and shields for protection. Horns were crafted into bowls and arrowheads, and fat was rendered for candles and soap. The Buffalo Roam blanket captures the power of that mighty beast of the plains. The design by Native American watercolor artist Joe Toledo puts the sacred buffalo in perspective. Looming large in close-up and appearing smaller in the distance, it was ever present in the lives of the Plains Indians. (This blanket is retired)

We very much enjoy working with Mr. Toledo, whose warmth and wit are only matched by his talent. Here is hoping there’s another blanket down the line.

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Artist profile: Raven and the Box of Knowledge by Preston Singletary

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Preston Singletary is an internationally reknowned glass artist who incorporates traditional Pacific Coast elements in his work. He draws upon his Tlingit heritage with a special concentration on motifs found in Chilkat weaving.

Preston Singletary in his Seattle Studio

Traditional Northwest Coast tribal art uses formlines and ovoids fluid to create work that is vigorous and stylized; paintings, weavings, baskets, masks and totem poles and more. Singletary’s uncommon choice of media–glass and light—invests traditional motifs with breathtaking dimensionality and luminosity.

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At Pendleton, we have enormous respect for traditional arts done with traditional materials. Glass was traditionally only used in Native American beading. Anyone viewing Preston Singletary’s work in glass would probably agree with the artist when he says that glass “transforms the notion that Native artists are only best when traditional materials are used.”

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Singletary’s show at the Museum of Glass left viewers in a state of awe. See more in this show catalog: ECHOES, FIRE AND SHADOWS

Glass may seem static, but it is extremely visually interactive with its environment. In this excerpt from a documentary by filmmaker Todd Pottinger, Singletary talks about his inspiration, his studio, and the crucial role of light in his work.

And here is his TED talk.

When Preston designed a blanket for the American Indian College Fund, he chose to tell the tale of Raven and the Box of Knowledge. You can see that this design carries the same glowing dimensionality of his art pieces, with ombred stripes of color that meet in the heart of the design to light it from within.

 

Raven and the Box of KnowledgeThis intriguing blanket is based on a work by internationally renowned glass artist Preston Singletary. Mr. Singletary grew up in the Pacific Northwest–both of his great-grandparents were full-blooded Tlingit Indians. His works explore traditional images and legends of his Tlingit heritage translated into glass. The image on this blanket represents Raven, a shape shifter and trickster who often employed crafty schemes to achieve his goals. In the story, the old chief who lived at the head of the Nass River kept his precious treasure –the sun, the moon and the stars– in beautifully carved boxes. Raven steals the light, and making his escape carries the sun in his mouth. The sun is a metaphor for enlightenment or knowledge. The ombred background shades meet in the center in vibrant colors of sun and light. Mr. Singletary’s artworks are included in museum collections from the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC to the Handelsbanken in Stockholm, Sweden. He is a member of the Board of Trustees for the Seattle Art Museum. A portion of the proceeds from this blanket will be donated to the American Indian College Fund.

See the College Fund blankets here: American Indian College Fund Blankets

 

Special Blanket Makes a Difference for Native American Women

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and November is Native American Heritage month. Throughout October and November, Pendleton is increasing our ongoing donation to NARA’s Women’s Wellness Program to support breast cancer awareness and treatment in Native American communities in the Northwest. 20% of proceeds from the Chief Joseph blanket and baby blanket in the special “Cherry” color will support NARA’s work with Native women. This bold and beautiful blanket makes a difference.

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A purchase of this beautiful cherry-pink blanket benefits the women’s health program of NARA, the Native American Rehabilitation Association of the Northwest, INC.

NARA is a Native American-owned, Native American-operated, nonprofit agency.

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The Native American Rehabilitation Association (NARA) Women’s Wellness Program provides culturally tailored breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services for American Indian and Alaska Native women. NARA works to bring care to underserved, uninsured, and underinsured women, and those who are rarely or never screened for breast and cervical cancer.  In additional to screening and diagnostic services, NARA offers assistance with referral coordination, transportation and navigation of health care appointments.

We had a conversation with Yolanda Moisa, most current director of the newest clinic run by NARA and the BCCP Director (Breast and Cervical Cancer Program), to learn about NARA’s women’s health program.

PWM: Can you tell me about your organization’s mission?

YM: Our mission at NARA is to provide education, physical and mental health services and substance abuse treatment that is culturally appropriate to American Indians, Alaska Natives and anyone in need. Our purpose is to achieve the highest level of physical, mental and spiritual well being for American Indians and Alaska Native people.

Our women’s health program is a critical part of our larger physical health outreach.  It’s the women who make this program so rewarding.  Throughout the 20 years of this program, we have helped women from all backgrounds. Each person is unique and has a story to tell. We save lives daily.  Our hope and goal is prevention and no cases of cancer ever, however, the reality is that catching cancer sooner than later makes for a much better prognosis.

PWM: Can you tell us about some of your more rewarding moments?

YM: There are so many stories of success and how we help women, we are helping generations of women.  A story that comes to mind is that we had a woman who had just moved to the Portland area and came in for another visit and our staff noticed she was due for her yearly women’s exams.  When she received her results from her mammogram a small lump in her breast was detected. She did find out that it was cancerous, it was caught at Stage 1.  We walked her through her options and our team was there to answer all her questions.  Just having someone listen to her and help manage the many appointments that come with cancer treatment was a comfort.  More importantly, she brought her daughter in and sisters in to be tested, again changing lives.

PWM: When did NARA form and how many people have you served?

NARA has been in the community since 1970, and offering medical care since 1993. Since 1996 we have helped Women receive 5,160 MAMS and 6,391 PAPS.  We have two clinics, one at North Morris Street and our new Wellness Center on East Burnside. The women’s health program is housed in our clinic at 12360 E Burnside, Portland, OR 97233. The program offers women’s services at both clinics where screenings, and references for mammograms to low income, uninsured Native women. We want to provide early detection for breast and cervical cancer. As an urban facility, we’ve been able to serve members from over 250 tribes, nations, bands, who are all able to access any of the services here.

PWM: That’s fantastic. What drew you to this program, Yolanda?

YM: I came to NARA after many years in the corporate legal field. I’m a member of the Tule River Tribe in Porterville CA, and it was always my intention to return to working with Native Americans–to give back. Throughout my career I have volunteered and advocated for women and children.  Coming to NARA was like finding a family that truly “got it”, understanding what it means to help our community.  I see my family in the many faces in our waiting rooms: my grandmother, aunties, uncles, mother and siblings. I came in as a grants manager and was here for almost two years. I became clinic director  two years ago, and was pleased when we received a HRSA grant that helped set up the pharmacy and pediatric program at the site. I’ve been here close to five years and have continued to appreciate all that NARA does. It’s pretty amazing!

PWM: Are there special challenges within the Native American community?

YM: For Native women, there is a history of trauma around medical services. Along with assault, abuse and harassment, there is a documented history of forced sterilization. This painful history plays into fear and mistrust of medicine.

Our CDC (Center for Disease and Control)  grant  allows us to do something special for Native American and Alaska Native women—weekend clinic sessions that we call the Well Women’s Event. These events are designed as a safe place for women.  It’s not uncommon to have generations of women from families come together. The grandmother, mother and daughter will all come for the daughter’s first mammogram for support.  We open the clinic to women only. Our guests are welcomed to a Native crafts night, and a women-only talking circle. The nurse on staff gives one-on-one advice and education.  We offer cervical cancer screens here, and transport woman safely to and from an off-site mammogram facility.

Any woman who gets a screening receives culturally specific books about women’s health, including  “Journey Woman: A Native Woman’s Guide to Wellness”. Through the generosity of Pendleton we were allowed to use  Pendleton art forms in the books.

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When women see themselves in health materials, it builds trust and adds warmth to what can be a very cold environment. Some women come just for the community events, and that’s fine. Our goal is to make women’s healthcare safe and communal, almost a celebration of womanhood.

PWM: How does the Pendleton blanket help?

YM: Each purchase of the blanket generates a donation to NARA. The money will go into the women’s health program, helping us expand our outreach to various underserved and marginalized communities within Portland.  We hope to start momentum that leads to continuing healthcare. If we can save one life, we’re proud.  Hopefully with these added donations we will continue to help many more women.  Thank you Pendleton!

70000_1323If you would like to help NARA through direct donation, feel free to contact Yolanda Moisa at ymoisa@naranorthwest.org or 503-224-1044.

If you would like to help through the purchase of the special edition Chief Joseph blanket (Cherry color only), see it HERE:

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Chief Joseph child-size blanket

 

Ginew: Surfing the PNW with a Pendleton blanket pattern

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We are loving this surfboard, the newest incarnation of Ginew’s Pendleton blanket design.

…we could feel the energy of the ocean and began to hear the distant w aves. Exiting through a tunnel of dense trees, we suddenly appeared on the beach and were welcomed by the pounding surf and swooping gulls. What a sight.

See all shots and read more here: GINEW Surf story

Fans of our brand know that we are no stranger to surf culture. Our Board Shirt was a favorite of the early SoCal surf scene, and graced the covers of several Beach Boys records. Our Surf Pendleton collection has been part of our Spring line for years. and you can check out older Pendleton surfboard collabs herehere and here.

And read about new wool surboards–yes, boards made of wool–here: Firewire Surboards

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#DudeCon celebrates twenty years of “The Big Lebowski.”

 

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We celebrated twenty years of the Dude, Walter, Donny and Jesus at our Park Avenue West Pendleton store on Friday, September 28th, 2018. We want to thank all the Achievers who came out to support our effort to set a Guinness World Record for Most People Dressed as the Dude. We haven’t heard from the Guiness folks yet, but we are hopeful.

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But back to the party.

The crowd was large and mellow. Attendees enjoyed trivia contests and prizes, a photo booth, refreshments worthy of any bowling alley, complimentary dog toys and sweaters, a swank commemorative cardigan pin, White Russians and craft beer courtesy of The Big Legrowlski, our esteemed event partners. They also had a familiar movie to watch, with a playlist that included all the best songs.

We gave away two Westerley cardigans every fifteen minutes!

The party culminated with a costume contest, and the winner was one happy Dude. We appreciated the coverage in Willamette Week, and on local news KGW.

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During the event, we offered a discount on all things Westerley. You can check out the goods here: The Dude’s Collection

Thank you to EVERYONE who came out to join the fun.

Twenty years, Dude. Twenty years.

Tommy Bahama and Pendleton Collaborate for Fall 2018

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Tommy Bahama is based in Seattle, and Pendleton Woolen Mills is based in Portland. Both brands share a PNW sensibility and a love of the beach lifestyle. So we’ve joined forces on the Tommy Bahama & Pendleton collection, with men’s and women’s apparel, accessories, and home products. The collection launches on October 4th at select Tommy Bahama stores, tommybahama.com, select Pendleton retail store locations and Pendleton-usa.com.

The collection is built around two collaborative fabric patterns. The Aloha Harding Print unites Pendleton’s Harding design with tropical florals. The Island Serape Stripe features a tropical leaf pattern jacquard with Pendleton’s classic blanket stripe. There are a variety of fabrics involved, but the wool fabrics and blankets are made exclusively in Pendleton’s own Pacific Northwest mills for this collection.

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So check it out at TommyBahama.com or Pendleton-usa.com. The collection will also be available at select Pendleton and Tommy Bahama retail stores.

You’re going to love it.

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