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Pendleton’s 10 best fall new arrivals to buy now


Happy fall! It’s Pendleton season: time for steaming mugs of tea, autumn leaves and curling up on the couch with a warm wool blanket. Wool may be breathable enough for spring and summer, especially in silky, light merino, but fall and winter are when we really shine. So chop the firewood, put on the kettle and check out 10 of our best new ways to stay cozy and stylish!


  1. Neskowin Wrap Coat

This wool jacket is so striking! Our geometric Harding pattern, almost a century old, is modern in black and ivory (plus it’ll match almost anything). This one will get you admiring glances and compliments wherever you go.


  1. 5th Avenue Throw in Auroral Plaid

New colors of our most luscious wool throw just arrived, including “auroral plaid,” a pattern named for the vivid greens and teals of the Northern Lights. I know I talked up this throw last time, but it’s seriously one of Pendleton’s best products—so soft and velvety, you just have to feel it to understand.


  1. Sunset Cross Knee High Socks

Soft and warm merino wool? Check. Eye-catching pattern? Check. Perfect knee-high length to peek out of your favorite fall boots? Also check. These socks are the newest addition to our bestselling socks, so scoop ’em up while you can!


  1. Journey Jacquard Shearling Collar Coat

This coat has gotten a lot of buzz already, and I can’t resist touching the soft shearling collar whenever I walk past it at work. It can just as easily be a hipster coat or an outdoorsy dad coat, don’t you think? The wool’s the same premium wool/cotton blend we use in our famous blankets (and woven in the Pacific Northwest). Definitely a winner!


  1. Sunset Cross Mesquite Cape

The rainbow of fall colors woven into this cape is gorgeous but not loud, anchored by flattering tawny hues. Looking at it gets me excited for pumpkin spice lattes (yes, I’m basic) and crunching crispy leaves underfoot. This is one of those pieces you’ll have forever because it’s unique, high quality and just that beautiful.


  1. Cedar Mountain Utility Tote

This ain’t no screenprinted cotton canvas tote you got free and use for veggies at the farmer’s market. This one is pure virgin wool in Southwestern colors and pretty diamonds with leather straps for added panache. There’s a sleeve for your laptop in there, too.


  1. Hooded Blanket Shawl

Tis the season to wrap up in softly brushed wool! Shawls are the new hoodies, in my book: just as easy to throw on, yet leagues more stylish. In quintessential autumn colors, this shawl will have people asking, “Do I know you from Instagram? Aren’t you that famous style blogger?”


  1. Boro Shirt

Guys can never have enough blue shirts (hey, they look great with jeans). But in a subtle patchwork pattern, this one is different enough to keep things interesting. Plus it’s pure virgin wool, so it won’t wrinkle and it’s naturally breathable. Also comes in a fitted version.

  1. National Park Motor Robe With Carrier

It’s still the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, and we’re celebrating with four new throws inspired by the Great Smoky Mountains, Badlands, the Grand Canyon and Acadia National Park. These each come with a leather carrier so you can bring yours along to a football game or keep it in the car in case you need it. (Watch out, though—dogs are quick to claim these!)


  1. Reversible Chaparral Cape

Simply stunning. I can picture Blake Lively wearing this dramatic cape while breezing through Manhattan in some cute black ankle boots and leggings. Or, more importantly, you! A warm, fashion-forward alternative to a jacket that will have you turning heads all autumn.


What’s your favorite, and what will you be wearing this fall?


Don’t forget; through December 9, 2016, we’re offering Free Shipping to try out your fall favorites. Details at


Labor Day: Stories from Pendleton’s People

Ed. note–For Labor Day, we bring you stories by those who work for us day and and day out. Their employment with out company ranges from one to fifty years. The video above, filmed in one of our union mills, is by Jay Carroll (thanks, Jay). 

Amanda Coppa—Product Manager, Home Division—July 2007 through present

My career experience at Pendleton has been an excellent and unique one. In nearly nine years with the Home Division I have continually evolved my position. Starting as the Home Merchandise coordinator and today I manage all the in-line and custom/collaboration Product Development for the division. I feel very fortunate to have a role where every day I am doing something different. When I started I was told I would be wearing a lot of hats. I’ve always found this appealing in a job and wouldn’t have it any other way. I’m fortunate to work for a boss that has much confidence in our abilities and vision.

In addition to exploring new product categories, I love working on the custom and collaboration blanket and fabric developments. I am the liaison between the partner (Levis, UGG, Nike, Ace Hotel, Subaru and Poler for example) and our internal Pendleton teams – Fabric Design, Production and Sales. From a custom blanket or fabric to a hooded Poncho towel I handle the process from concept to production set-up. Another exciting part of my position is traveling to accounts for sales calls and tradeshows. This has taken me to many big cities, but also some places I never thought I would go… Dodgeville, WI – High Point, NC – Buffalo, NY.

One of the reasons I enjoy working here the most is my team I spend each and every day with. We not only do good work, we have fun doing it. I have quite a few great Pendleton memories, but the top three would be managing the Star Wars project, my first inspiration trip to the Southwest and the 2009 Sales Meeting in Pendleton, OR to celebrate our centennial. I know I’m in the right place and speak enthusiastically about my career when my 3 year old son already has a passion for what I do and had decided his first dog’s name is going to be “Pendleton”.


Brooke Myers—Retail Store Associate, Lancaster, PA—2015 through present

When I was younger, I did not necessarily see myself working in retail. As most children do, I saw myself doing something big – something exciting, something that would keep me on my toes and intrigue me every day. These descriptions usually do not come to mind when one says they work in retail. Working for Pendleton Woolen Mills has been a completely different experience. Who would have thought that you could be not only a salesperson, a manager; but also a historian, an explorer, and lastly a valued member of a family – not just another employee? My experience working for Pendleton has not been an ordinary one and I mean that in the best way possible.

Rich in history and heritage, the story of this company has captivated me from the beginning. Every day that I come to work I am eager to find out more. From its origins in North American exploration, Native American trade and legend, to the evolution of men’s and women’s fashion and style, the Pendleton story is not one easily forgotten. It brings me so much fulfillment to learn about the roots of this company and share the many stories of our past with others.

Another component of the multi-faceted brand of Pendleton that continues to make every day of work rewarding is the emphasis and dedication to our National Parks. By creating excitement through product and educating others about our parks, we are not only contributing to our parks monetarily but cultivating an environment that stresses the importance of the preservation and protection of our beautiful country.

Since I have started working for Pendleton Woolen Mills a little over a year ago, I can confidently say that I am now intertwined and attached to the history, craftsmanship, and uniqueness of this company. It makes my job easier knowing that I am part of a family that is dedicated to not only their brand and product, but also their employees and customers.


Lakshmi Sylvie Dady—2015 through 2016

Pendleton has been a part of my family since we migrated to this country from Guyana, South America two generations ago. It has been a great joy to continue the family tradition of working in textiles and fashion as a Pendleton employee. Although I am new to the company, the brand has a rich history that transcends corporate identity and is part of my family’s story.

Having owned her own accessory company in Guyana, South America, my German-born grandmother was immediately drawn to the Pendleton brand upon her arrival to Milwaukie, Oregon. She encouraged my mother to get an after school job in the Pendleton mill near their home. My mother, then a mere 16 years of age, quickly learned the hard work that goes into producing the high quality Pendleton products our family coveted. Mama went on to a career in nursing and eventually followed in her mother’s footsteps of owning her own company, manufacturing fashion forward scrubs called “It’s What’s on the Inside that Counts.” Surely her humble beginnings in the mill helped build the foundation for creating her own textile business years later.

Growing up in the Northwest, Pendleton is as much a part of being an Oregonian as is relishing the rain. From my Native best friend whose parents draped themselves and their home in the rich colors and patterns of Pendleton to receiving a full outfit from the company as a Rose Festival Princess in 2009, Pendleton patterns are the unofficial flag of this fine state. Going into the corporate office to get custom fitted for my Pendleton outfit as Cleveland High Schools Rose Festival Princess remains a highlight of my experience on the court. I still relish my sesquicentennial ‘Spirit of the People’ patterned skirt, glass case, notebook cover and purse gifted by the company. The company went so far as to sew custom labels with our title and name onto our skirts, I smile every time I see my “Princess Sylvie” tag.

My love for this brand has only grown over time and gifts from it continue to be highly valued amongst my family. Upon my return to Portland after 7 years away for undergrad and graduate school, I was thrilled to see a position open at the Pendleton store at the Portland International Airport. I’ve been with the company since March, 2016 and thoroughly enjoy continuing the family tradition of working for America’s greatest woolen mill.

It’s been a pleasure reflecting on my Pendleton story and I hope you feel inspired to continue creating yours.


Verna J. Ashton—1966 through 2016 with assistance to:

Strategical Services Head, Ed Pedley

Fabric Design Dept. Head, John Jouret

Presidents C.M. Bishop, Jr. and C.M. Bishop III


Although the scrapbooks confirm a mid-60’s employment record with Pendleton Woolen Mills, my personal connection begins a few years earlier.  When I met my future husband, Richard Ashton, at High School, his father, Howard Ashton, worked for the Bureau of U.S. Customs and his office just happened to be located on the 2nd floor, NE corner of the old / former US. Custom’s Building directly across the street West of the current Pendleton Building (if he were still there, my office window would have looked directly into his!).  He often told us of his travels for the day and related several times when he was assigned to go to the docks to inspect bales of wool being brought into the country from Australia or New Zealand to be delivered to Pendleton’s Columbia Wool Scouring Plant – beginning the process of becoming fine woolen fabrics.  Additionally, my future Mother-in-law, Marion Ashton, worked as a spinner at Pendleton’s Foundation Factory Plant and it was there that she obtained fabrics for hand-sewn shirts for her son and gave me the remnants so I could make matching garments.  Our matching outfits were always commented on at school and especially the red/black plaids worn on “spirit day” as those were our school colors.

Connections first through the Ashton family, and yes, Richard too was employed summers and even refinished the wood floors in the Foundation Plant along with the Brot Bishop boys; but it was through my sister, Malinda Pfeifle Staples, that I became acquainted with Pendleton as my employer as she held the secretary position under Ed Pedley in Statistical Services. In April 1966 I had a choice to make – either continue studies at Portland State College or take the offer at Pendleton to work for Mr. Pedley – my sister was leaving to begin her family.  Thus began a life journey that though the formal career has now officially concluded with retirement on April 29th, I am in the finishing room. The friendships, relationships, business associations and memories are completing my life-story tapestry by attaching the binding edges.

My story begins with being honored to meet and know C. M. Bishop until his passing in 1969; a never-to-be forgotten innocent and embarrassing blunder voiced during a National Sales Meeting at Salishan Lodge (Coffee, Tea or… how does that go?!); Shorthand learned in High School proved invaluable when asked to take notes from the Ambassador to Romania (Alan Green) while vising with his friend C. M. Bishop,  Jr.; Sitting at the feet of Ms. Pat Mitchell (who had been secretary to C. M. Bishop) learning valuable history, skills and understanding.  Pat will celebrate 107 years of life this August; Letters and phone calls to our Nation’s President George Bush (the elder Bush) as well as many other US Representatives, State Governors and political figures who were friends to the Bishop family; Assisting Portland’s current First Lady, Nancy Hales, in her mission for Pendleton gifts to take abroad for government dignitaries on the Mayor’s travels, and garments to wear herself – a true Pendleton Ambassador; Relationships with Round-Up personalities, Queen Whitney White in 2007, Native American Elders…

But long before hearing Mr. B’s (C.M. Bishop, Jr.) 1993 corporate speech quoting  a 1941 inscription written to him by his Father, C. M. Bishop, on the flyleaf of his co-authored book “Pioneer Woolen Mills in Oregon,” I felt and experienced these words  “… the best inheritance to receive or to leave is a good name” lived out not only through the Bishop men and Management of the Company, but also every one of the women – wives, aunts, sisters, and daughters – in their consistent and constant sweet spirits, graciousness and courtesies. “ I subscribe to a belief that as Pendleton has been blessed with the ability to create through the woven thread beautiful fabrics and designs that many covet, cherish and last a lifetime, God is weaving our life-story through our relationships and responses to His shuttle.

Pendleton Woolen Mills and the Bishop family have and are leaving that good name and reputation for future generations.  Honesty, integrity, the Golden Rule standard are the legacy that keeps Pendleton great and America strong.  God bless America and God bless Pendleton Woolen Mills.  Cheers!







Pendleton Woolen Mills is proud to announce two new Pendleton blankets as a tribute to “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” and “Star Wars: Rogue One.”

This is the droid you’re looking for. This limited edition Pendleton blanket depicts the lovable droid BB-8, an indisputable fan favorite and major scene-stealer who debuted in The Force Awakens. Ombré shading represents the blue and red lightsabers of Rey and Kylo Ren, the film’s hero and villain, while geometric shapes add a distinctly Pendleton touch.

Dark silhouettes hint at the mysterious heroes at the heart of Star Wars: Rogue One, the latest chapter of the Star Wars saga. This limited edition Pendleton blanket gives you a sneak peek at new characters Jyn Erso and Captain Cassian Andor, as well as the droid K-2SO, the tropical planet of Scarif–and is that Darth Vader and the Death Star in the distance? Bands of green reflect the film’s muted palette.RogueOne_StarWars_MotorRobe_F

The edition size is limited to 1977 hand-numbered units for each of the full-size blankets. Each is presented in a commemorative box. The BB-8 box stacks with the previous four editions released in 2015.




Each blanket also comes in a Padawan child-sized edition. We’re still waiting on our “Star Wars: Rogue One” sample, but here’s the BB-8 blanket. As you can see, it’s a slightly warmer/brighter palette, with a bright yellow whipstitched binding. And he’s a friendly droid for a child’s room!



Every blanket is made in America, woven in Pendleton’s own Pacific Northwest Mill.

The blankets are scheduled to ship in early October. They are available for preorder on Friday, September 2nd. Preorder online here: SHOP STAR WARS BLANKETS

The blankets are also available for preorder at the Pendleton store locations listed below.

Pendleton retail stores:

Downtown Portland

Pendleton Woolen Mill





The Pendleton Home Store

Pendleton Outlet stores:



Columbia Gorge


Lake Arrowhead


Yosemite National Park’s New Custom Pendleton Blanket


Each year, Pendleton does a robust custom blanket business for companies, tribes, artists and philanthropic organizations. These are definitely Pendleton blankets, but the entire production run is produced for (and belongs to) the client.

It’s a process to bring blankets to the loom. We have a special department that handles all the steps needed to bring a customer’s ideas to life.  We help to translate design ideas into workable patterns that we can actually produce. We give advice on color and finishing, and create special labels that tell the story of the blanket.

This year, we were honored to produce custom blankets for two of our national parks. You read about the colorful new Yellowstone blanket earlier this summer. For Yosemite National Park, we produced a gorgeous blanket in black, cream and grey.


This design echoes the iconic black and white photography of Ansel Adams. This revered photographer’s work didn’t just immortalize nature. His work helped protect it, as well. You can read about his life here: ANSEL ADAMS and see some of his incredible work in this interview with his son.


Just as we did with the Yellowstone blanket, we sent the Yosemite blanket to three of our brand ambassadors. We wanted to see the blanket through their lenses. Their interpretations are beautiful and surprisingly different.

Kate Rolston took the blanket to the mountains:



Taylor Colson Horton & Cameron Powell took the blanket to the back yard:



And Bri Heiligenthal brought the blanket home:


Three different visions of one beautiful blanket. Thanks to our amazing photographers. Follow them on Instagram for more.

Bri Heiligenthal

Kate Rolston

Taylor Colson Horton

Cameron Powell

And the blanket? Of course you can get your own! Right here: YOSEMITE GIFT SHOP


Celebrating America’s Treasures with the #pendle10park Explorers

Last year, we sent out a call on Instagram, asking for photographers to take our blankets home to their parks. We were overwhelmed with responses! After diligent review of well over a thousand Instagram feeds, we chose ten and called it good.

You’ve seen their work all year, but this video takes you on a tour of all ten parks, with a catchy banjo score that has us tapping our feet here at the office. So Happy Birthday to the National Park Service and thank you to our #pendletonparks explorers. You can see them all (and follow them ALL on Instagram) at the end of the movie.



Pendleton for the National Parks

Wishing the National Park Service a happy 100th birthday with a Crater Lake Memory…and a bear!

To help celebrate the centennial year of the National Park Serivce, Pendleton sent out a call for national park memories to our Pendleton employees. We received so many fun responses–memories and photos and close encounters of the wildlife kind. We’ve shared many with you, and have a few more to share as the year rolls along.

This response came in the form of a stack of black and white photos taken with a Kodak Brownie camera. And so, a sweet little movie was born. Thanks to Margaret for sharing this with us, and thanks to you all for sharing the fun.

And happy official 100th birthday to the National Park Service–it’s today!


Preston Singletary at Seattle Pendleton: Meet the Artist

Preston Singletary in his Seattle Studio

We are honored to host Preston Singletary this Friday evening at the opening of our new Seattle Pendleton store. Singletary is an internationally reknowned glass artist who incorporates traditional Pacific Coast elements in his work. He draws upon his Tlingit heritage with a special concentration on motifs found in Chilkat weaving.

Traditional Northwest Coast tribal art uses formlines and ovoids fluid to create work that is vigorous and stylized; paintings, weavings, baskets, masks and totem poles and more. Singletary’s uncommon choice of media–glass and light—invests traditional motifs with breathtaking dimensionality and luminosity.


At Pendleton, we have enormous respect for traditional arts done with traditional materials. Glass was traditionally only used in Native American beading. Anyone viewing Preston Singletary’s work in glass would probably agree with the artist when he says that glass “transforms the notion that Native artists are only best when traditional materials are used.”







Singletary’s show at the Museum of Glass left viewers in a state of awe. See more in this show catalog: ECHOES, FIRE AND SHADOWS

Glass may seem static, but it is extremely visually interactive with its environment. In this excerpt from a documentary by filmmaker Todd Pottinger, Singletary talks about his inspiration, his studio, and the crucial role of light in his work.

And here is his TED talk.

When Preston designed a blanket for the American Indian College Fund, he chose to tell the tale of Raven and the Box of Knowledge. You can see that this design carries the same glowing dimensionality of his art pieces, with ombred stripes of color that meet in the heart of the design to light it from within.


Raven and the Box of KnowledgeThis intriguing blanket is based on a work by internationally renowned glass artist Preston Singletary. Mr. Singletary grew up in the Pacific Northwest–both of his great-grandparents were full-blooded Tlingit Indians. His works explore traditional images and legends of his Tlingit heritage translated into glass. The image on this blanket represents Raven, a shape shifter and trickster who often employed crafty schemes to achieve his goals. In the story, the old chief who lived at the head of the Nass River kept his precious treasure –the sun, the moon and the stars– in beautifully carved boxes. Raven steals the light, and making his escape carries the sun in his mouth. The sun is a metaphor for enlightenment or knowledge. The ombred background shades meet in the center in vibrant colors of sun and light. Mr. Singletary’s artworks are included in museum collections from the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC to the Handelsbanken in Stockholm, Sweden. He is a member of the Board of Trustees for the Seattle Art Museum. A portion of the proceeds from this blanket will be donated to the American Indian College Fund.

You can meet Preston Singletary this Friday evening at the opening of our new Seattle Pendleton store. The artist will be on hand to discuss his work and sign your blanket boxes. Friday’s Grand Opening events are a fundraiser for the American Indian College Fund. You can help support the work of this fantastic organization through your blanket purchases, with Pendleton making an additional donation for every College Fund blanket sold.

More Seattle Pendleton information here: SEATTLE PENDLETON

See the College Fund blankets here: American Indian College Fund Blankets


Pendleton Experiences in Yosemite National Park

Please enjoy a Pendleton employee park memory: Yosemite memories and photos from Greg, who is one of our northern California account managers.

I have procrastinated on this, because it will be tough to pick a single Yosemite memory. I have been going to the park for 40 years, visiting a couple of times per year. I also go as a vendor. Every time, I see something different, even if it’s just a day trip to the Valley to “work” (if you can call it that).



My first trip was a high school backpacking trip, when we watched a mama bear and her two cubs attempt to steal food that we’d stored up in a small pine tree. One of the cubs was sent up the tree to get the pack, but he wasn’t small enough. The tree snapped! Down came the tree and the cub to the ground. We hiked out the next day, 12 miles in the pouring rain.

Over the years I’ve hiked and climbed some of the park’s largest peaks, fly-fished many of the lakes and streams, backcountry skied into the Ostrander Hut and snow camped throughout the park.

I was there a week after the Valley flood of 1997 when they were still pulling campground picnic tables out of the trees. Signs now mark the high water mark along the Merced River six feet over the road.


I was there just after the huge rockfall at Glacier Point covered Happy Isles with an eerie, almost lunar, pulverized granite dust and debris.

I was there when Mel Gibson, Jodi Foster and James Garner filmed the teepee village scenes in the El Capitan Meadow for the remake of Maverick.


After a lifetime of special memories, it’s too hard to choose one.


Are you ready for your own Yosemite adventures? We’d love to come along with you.


Image: Allie Taylor (@alliemtaylor)

And remember, your purchase of our National Park Collection helps support preservation and restoration of America’s Treasures.


UGG Australia and Pendleton for 2016: National Park Style!


Pendleton and UGG Australia have done it again, this time in styles that honor America’s National Parks! The new collection for men and women features iconic UGG® boots and slippers paired with the historic National Park Stripe designs of Pendleton’s National Park blankets.

ugg-in-the-forestThe limited-edition UGG® X Pendleton® Collection will be available at all UGG®concept stores in North America and Asia, online at, and at select wholesale partners beginning August 15.


You probably recognize the stripe patterns from our Yellowstone and Yosemite blankets, shown here in photos by two of our #pendle10park explorers; Corey Jenkins (@ourfreeways) and Allie Taylor (@alliemtaylor).



The boots, like our blankets, are part of our initiative to honor and support the National Park Service in its mission to preserve America’s treasures, our National Parks.

See our selection here: Pendleton x UGG Australia.  We would love it if you bought from our site, but we have already sold through some styles and colors. So please head to UGG Australia to find anything you don’t see in our selection. And please don’t wait. The collection is honestly flying out the door. And we are not supposed to play favorites, but this style is our favorite.


That’s how you walk the dog, people.



10 Best Things to Buy from Pendleton Right Now

Ed. note: a guest post by Holly from our Catalog team. Enjoy!

“Wool” and “summer” don’t really go together. But as one of Pendleton’s catalog writers, I’m privy to some of the less-obvious gems on our site—some of the well-made, quality pieces that are perfect for warmer months (and really all year). Consider this your inside scoop as to our best buys. From $20 to $200+, here’s what you should be buying from Pendleton’s site right now.


Patterned leggings, $44.50

From our new Everywear™ athleisure line, these are cute, bright and modern, with a geometric pattern that’s very Pendleton. Wear to work under a black pencil skirt or swingy black tunic, or top with a tunic and stay comfy for weekend errands.


Oversized featherweight wool scarf, $89.50

Already a popular piece among Pendleton employees! You might recognize the pattern from our Harding blankets, a close relative of our iconic Chief Joseph design. This scarf is huge, supersoft and lightweight—ideal for offices, movie theaters and anywhere else with aggressive air conditioning.


Mara Hoffman spa towel, $79.50

Your beach bag or bathroom will thank you (trust me, I have three of these). Not only are our beach towels really plush and big, but Mara Hoffman’s designs are stunning. One side is soft and sheared; the other is looped and absorbent.


High peaks jacquard cotton throw, $129

What to put on your bed during the hot months? This supersoft cotton throw with geo designs and stripes. Like our wool blankets, the design is still classic Pendleton, just in a lighter, airier form.


Chief Joseph pillow, $69.50

If summer’s gotten you a little stir-crazy with your décor, mix things up with this accent pillow. (Need convincing? It’s an interior designer favorite and has shown up in decorating magazines galore.) The toughest part is picking a color…


Echo Peaks zip pouch with keychain, $29.50

A colorful little indulgence with an irresistibly cute buffalo keychain. Bonus: wool is naturally dirt- and stain-resistant, so it’ll stay nice-looking for longer.


Devon cable trim cardigan, on sale for $39.99

This airy open-knit cardi is on point for the summer-to-fall transition–and in fun teal and pink to boot. Layer over a tank now and over a long-sleeve tee later. More colors at the link.


Sunshine stripe rib tee, on sale for $18.99

Sure, you can find similar striped shirts at this price with a similar French-chic vibe. But this one is especially well made. I have it in mint and it’s impressively colorfast; it hasn’t shrunk or gotten misshapen, either. This isn’t one of those fast-fashion shirts you throw away after three wearings! More colors at the link. (Note: They’re generously sized—I’m usually a medium in most brands but wear an XS in this tee.)


Plaid 5th Avenue throw, $149

Summer means wedding season, which means scrolling through an online gift registry or going rogue with our softest, nicest throw. It’s pure merino wool and so luxurious you won’t want to part with it. There’s a plaid for everyone at the link.

PendletonWoolenMillsSV6065KD.jpgOversized coffee mug, $19.50

Birthday present, back-to-school gift for a college freshman, gift for yourself…these mugs are perfect for just about anyone. They’re hardy, dishwasher-safe ceramic and, at 18 ounces, big enough for cereal, soup, or a sizeable dosage of caffeine. (And they celebrate the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, too!)