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Tiny Home Living with Sean, Tam and Pendleton

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Sean and Tam, a Canadian couple, have recently started on a new adventure: residence in a tiny home. As part of their plan to live more and own less, they’ve chosen have quality, beautiful items that work hard while taking up as little space as possible. Fr their bed, they chose an unnapped Pendleton blanket in the Los Ojos pattern, and agreed to share their photos and perspectives on tiny home living with us. 

When did you decide to try tiny home living?

About 4 years ago we stumbled upon a tiny cabin being sold on Craigslist by a company called Driftwood Campers.  Something about that little camper sparked a light in us about alternative ways of living.  We discussed buying the camper, but decided that we just didn’t have anywhere to store it as we owned a small apartment with one parking stall.

The conversation died down a bit until we saw the documentary “Tiny”.  As we watched we kept looking at each other saying “we should do that!”  Something just made sense about this style of living.  That was the turning point for us; we had made up our minds.

We started researching tiny houses, and over the course of two years, we sold off almost everything we owned.  It wasn’t an easy thing to do, but definitely became a freeing change.  It’s amazing how much stuff we accumulate that in some way or another starts to defines us.

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Is there anything about who you are as people, as a couple, that made you think that this was the perfect solution for you?

Sean and I have never really felt at home anywhere we have lived.  For us, having the ability to move around seems very normal and somewhat comforting. Sean spent a lot of time moving around when he was young.  His parents were semi-hippies and they lived in a RV in Florida when he was a kid.

I think what makes this work so well is that we love adventure and things that are out of the normal routine of life.  We didn’t just want to spend our lives living pay cheque to pay cheque.  Life is so short; we want to make the most of it.  Living tiny has allowed us to actually start experiencing all the things we once only dreamed of.  It’s almost as if a weight has been lifted off out shoulders.  For the first time in our lives we finally feel at home.

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Can you tell us a little about the type of house you chose to build, and where it is sited?

Sean and I designed the layout and look of our house.  We spent countless hours in shipping containers, taping out floor plans and moving things around, and visiting numerous tiny houses to see how different spaces worked for us.  Since neither of us have building experience, we decided it was best for us to have the house built by a company that specializes in tiny houses.  It was important to us to have a house that was as nontoxic as possible and built using some reclaimed materials.  We wanted the look and feel of the house to reflect us and our fun and quirky personalities.

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How long did it take to bring your plans to fruition?

It took about 3 years from when we decided that building a tiny house was the right move for us to selling off all of our stuff, including our apartment.  We officially moved into our tiny house in October of 2016. Currently we are parked just outside Vancouver B.C. Canada.

The tiny house builder that we chose to work with is located on Vancouver Island in B.C. Canada. They stated it would take approximately 2-3 months to complete the build of our tiny house.  It took us about 6 months to finally get the house from them and then another 7 months for us to fix all of the deficiencies/problems the house had.  It was a total nightmare.  All in all it was just over a year for the house to be done from start to finish.

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Your décor is beautiful! We are proud that you used our Los Ojos blanket. Did you have a concept or theme in mind? How did Pendleton work in with that?

Thank you!  I am a bit obsessed with interior design and knew what feel I wanted for the house from the very start of the build. We did a lot of work sourcing things out to give to our builder.

It was really important for use to use some reclaimed product with a bit of a rustic feel.  Our floor is actually from an old barn that was torn down in Philadelphia.  Our live-edge kitchen counters are from a Black Walnut tree that was ethically removed from a heritage house in New Westminster B.C.

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I think it’s the small details of decor that really make a space special and in the end it was well worth all the time and effort.

I have always loved Pendleton and the rich history the company embodies.  It was something we knew we really wanted to incorporate into the house.  I am inspired by Navajo art and prints so when we thought about the décor of our bedroom, we immediately thought of Pendleton.  We didn’t just want to go out and get a blanket; we wanted something high quality that would last for decades.  Everyone who comes into our house always says, “That blanket is gorgeous! Where did you get it?”

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(You can get it here)

Do you see this as a long term, sustainable lifestyle for you?

The plan for us is 7-10 years.  We are saving too hopefully by a small piece of land in Tofino, B.C. Canada.  We would like to build a small eco-friendly house.  We will keep the tiny house for road trips and for friends and family to stay in when they visit.  Spending our days surfing, cooking and riding motorbikes!

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So many people are drawn to tiny home living, but struggle with the idea of such a major downsize in space. Has anything disappointed you about your choice?

Nothing about living here has disappointed us, but we were most disappointed by the experience we had with our builder.  The whole process was very disheartening.  We hope that no one has to go through what we went through.  I think if we could do it all over again we would have just built the house ourselves and hired help as we needed it.

What has surprised you about tiny home living?

The most surprising thing is how comfortable we are in the house.  We have just what we need and know where everything is, which is a really nice feeling.  We spend a lot more time outdoors living life than inside watching T.V. or on the computer.

What has delighted you about tiny home living?

I think that fact that we are doing this together is the best part.  It’s been an adventure with a lot of adjustments and things to get used to but we wouldn’t trade it for anything.  It’s definitely brought us closer together.  If you can live with your partner in a tiny house you can do anything together. We are in it together for the good, bad and the tiny!

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We want to thank Tam for answering our questions, and both Sean and Tam for sharing their life with us in words and photos. Photo credit: @irisandbloomphoto

Follow  @tinyhouseholisticliving for more from Tam and Sean.

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Herreshoff Design, Pendleton Patterns

Ed. note: We love getting letters from our friends. Today’s is from Terry, who was an account manager for Pendleton for decades. Now retired, he’s living the good life in Montana. And that includes spending a lot of time in this gorgeous boat.

Here is Terry’s letter.

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Hi Friends,

I was a Pendleton Salesman for 40 years. During that time I was always enamored with the Native American part of our company’s history, how in the late 1890s, Pendleton Woolen Mills started weaving those beautiful intricate Native American patterns into blankets that became the impeccable standard.

I met Greg Morley, who owns Morley Cedar Canoes at Swan Lake, Montana, in 1996 .  He crafted a canoe for me at that time, and I have become very close friends with the family since. Greg Morley worked at the Forest Service out of Salem, Oregon, in the late 60s. Before leaving to build canoes in Swan Lake, Greg was designated to source the Oregon Trail. It took him two years, but he tracked and documented it. He brings that same precision to boat building.

Steve, Greg’s son, has carried on the trade, and built this Herreshoff Design row boat for me. He invited me up to pick out each individual cedar strip for the boat. I brought one of my Pendleton blankets along, and he inlaid the pattern right into the boat. It is a banded Robe from 1920s. You can find the blanket in The Language of the Robe by Robert W. Kapoun on page 53.

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Here is a moody shot of the boat on gorgeous Swan Lake, the Gateway to Glacier National Park.

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All the best,

Terry

 

See our inspiring blankets here: SHOP

And enjoy your weekend.

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Top 10 New Arrivals to Shop for Spring 2017

 

 

Brighter, warmer days are on their way! If that’s not a compelling enough to come out of hibernation, what about 150+ new pieces to breathe some life into your wardrobe? Here are the 10 best picks you should scoop up before they sell out. 

  1. Mya Cardigan

This is your must-have spring cardigan. It’s cut in a fresh, shorter length with a dazzling pattern and blue shades that’ll go perfectly with your favorite jeans. It sold out last year, but now it’s back in two new palettes—get one before it’s gone!

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  1. Mixed Media Pullover

This cotton top is the definition of easy, casual comfort. But the relaxed fit and wide sleeves don’t look sloppy, thanks to textural interest in knit horizontal bands and subtle diagonal stripes. Pair with a statement necklace or patterned scarf.

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  1. Colorblock Poncho

When you’re wrapping up in this cozy, lightweight sweater at the beach or on the couch, you’ll appreciate the quality, thanks to premium pima cotton. Just like wool, all cotton isn’t alike—and pima cotton is the best. It’s strong, soft, silky and unlikely to pill, making this piece a smart investment.

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  1. Marseille Stripe Tee

Channel your inner French ingénue with these colorful striped cotton tops in a rainbow of happy spring colors. The high neck adds a sophisticated touch, and the gently rounded hem is flattering. Get a couple and they’ll soon become wardrobe staples with skirts and denim.

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  1. Chloe Skirt

In a luxe cotton and silk blend, this striped maxi skirt is just begging to flutter in the breeze as you walk on the sand. Need outfit ideas? Nautical navy and white match with the Colby Suit Sweater, Ribbed Crewneck Pullover or Sandi Shirt.

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  1. Medallion Print Wrap Dress

If this dress doesn’t make you want to go to the Greek Isles, nothing will. The blue-and-white medallion print has Mediterranean flair, and the wrap style is universally flattering. With a hint of stretch, the soft fabric is comfortable and forgiving. This one will go seamlessly from day to night.

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  1. Colorblock Pullover

Another cute denim-friendly piece to help you transition from winter to spring. Choose from blue or tan, then pair it with your favorite tank or cami. In an airy, open knit, it could even double as a swimsuit cover-up.

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  1. Marin Pullover

Modern black and white more your style? Then you’ll love this asymmetrical striped sweater in a soft cotton blend. It’s chic enough for the office with slacks or a pencil skirt, or dress it down with skinny jeans and comfy white sneakers.

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  1. Short-Sleeve Tee

Our customers’ favorite short-sleeve t-shirt now comes in a lively pink and robin’s egg blue, as well as classic black, white, ivory and tan. Great for casual looks or layering under a sweater, this tee won’t fade or lose its shape.

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  1. Open-Front Cardigan

This soft, draped cardi hits the sweet spot between comfort and style. It’s cozy like a hoodie, but done better with an open waterfall front and geo designs peeking out. You’ll want to wear it all day, from your morning coffee run to evenings on the couch.

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What’s your favorite piece from Pendleton’s spring new arrivals? What will you be stocking up on this season?

See these styles and more at www.pendleton-usa.com

WOVEN: an interactive magazine for Pendleton Woolen Mills

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We’re so excited to present the first issue of WOVEN , our Pendleton lifestyle magazine, celebrating winter, wool, and the romance of Pendleton.  We launched the print version last week at the Outdoor Retailer trade show, where it was received with enthusiasm. In the online version, there are links to stories and our Pendleton Threads podcast.

Ready for a terrifying tale of winter survival? Click the link. Curious about where the money we raised for the National Park Foundation is going? There’s a link for that, too. With gorgeous photography by brand ambassadors including Brandon BurkShondina Leeour #pendle10park explorers and more, WOVEN is a feast for the eyes.

Check it out here: www.pendleton-usa.com/mag

Pendleton at #Sundance

If you could be anywhere this weekend, would you choose the Sundance Film Festival?

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Here we are (courtesy of a Vulture  tweet). Jay-Z’s Tidal is dressing their sets with our blankets-that’s the Silver Bark blanket in the middle, with Rainier and Glacier on each side.

Another shot from @benjaminbratt

We also showed up in the @applegate lounge with a national parks Motor Robe:

A coat made from one of our Chief Joseph blankets is worn by Water Defender LaDonna Bravebull, who is tirelessly getting the message out at the festival.

You can't drink oil, keep it in the soil. LaDonna Bravebull. Badass. Standing Rock. #sundancefilmfestival

A post shared by Cassian Elwes (@cassianelwes) on

We hope Pendleton blankets have been helping people stay warm in North Dakota.

If you spot more shots of Pendleton at Sundance, let us know, will you? Stay warm, everyone. And remember, our blankets are proudly made in the USA.

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Pendleton Mill Tribute Series: J. Capps and Sons – 1892 to 1917

 

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The last mill in our series of blankets paying tribute to the Golden Age of the Trade blanket is the J. Capps and Sons Woolen Mill of Jacksonville, Illinois.

Our friend Barry Friedman, the foremost historian and scholar of Native American Trade blankets, has concluded that the very first blankets for the Native trade were manufactured by J. Capps and Sons in 1892. Barry has come to this conclusion through painstaking research that only a truly obsessed person would perform, so we trust his findings.

j-cappsmill1865The J. Capps & Sons Woolen Mill in 1865

Joseph Capps arrived in Jacksonville, Illinois in 1839, only 21 years after Illinois became a state. He opened a wool-carding business, to which he would add spinning machines, looms and other weaving machines to become a fully operational weaving mill. As his business grew, so did his family; sons Stephen, William and Joseph would become partners in the firm, and carried on the business after Joseph’s death in 1872.

The Capps & Sons mill produced plain bed blankets, men’s suitings and other woolen goods throughout its years of operation. They also produced blanket overcoats.

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Production of the Trade blanket ceased in 1917, when the mill’s production was diverted to the needs of WWI.

The first sales records of “Indian blankets” appears in Capps’ business records in 1892. In 1893, the blankets are first mentioned in their marketing materials. The company apparently operated under three names: J. Capps & Sons, Ltd., the Jacksonville Woolen Mills, the American Indian Blanket Mills. Despite the name, at no time were Native Americans involved in the design or weaving of these blankets. The patterns were mostly designed by Portuguese weavers who worked at the mill.

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For our Mill Tribute series, we reproduced seven J. Capps & Sons, Ltd. designs. Capps designs remain much the same through their decades of production, and they produced surprisingly few patterns over that time. The designs make little use of the curvilinear abilities of the jacquard loom, keeping to “straight-line” patterns. To quote Barry: “With no other company that produced Indian blankets over so long a time do we see the continuity of design and pattern…A Capps blanket from 1915 looks very much like a Capps blanket from the 1890s.”

And again, we wish to make it clear that while Native Americans were enthusiastic customers for these elegant blankets, they were not involved in the design or manufacture of these patterns. The Capps names are listed for reference only.

Capps 1 – retired

We chose a rarity for our very first Capps tribute blanket. It is unnamed and uncatalogued in the Capps literature, but was sold in at least three color combinations. The original of this bold and beautiful version was produced circa 1910.

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Capps 2 – retired

Capps referred to this as the “Cheyenne Basket pattern, a Riot of Color.” You can see it over the arm of the woman in the ad above.

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Capps 3 – retired

Capps called this the Shoshone pattern, and the orginal version is a favorite among collectors.

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Capps 4 – retired

This bright design was called “A Typical Moqui” by Capps.

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Capps 5 – retired

An exciting pattern done in traditional colors, this was a consumer favorite in our Mill Tribute series. In the Capps catalog, it is called the “Kiowa Rattlesnake” pattern.

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Capps 6available here

Another rarity provided this pattern, called “Navajo” in the Capps literature.

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Capps 7 – Available here

For our final Capps tribute, we chose the pattern they called “Papago.” The original Capps version is a favorite among collectors of vintage trade blankets for its graphic boldness and overall symmetry.

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Our thanks to Barry Friedman for his research and writing. You can learn so much more about the Native American Trade Blanket from Barry’s books:

Chasing Rainbows

Still Chasing Rainbows

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Thank you, Everyone: Your Gift to the National Parks.

Throughout 2016, we have been donating a portion of the proceeds from all our National Park Collection merchandise to the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks, to help support restoration and preservation of two historic national park landmarks. All of our National Park Collection collaboration partners have donated as well. This means that with  every purchase you’ve made, you’ve also made a donation!

“Every single dollar that was donated through your purchases makes a big difference for these incredible gems in our national parks and the people who visit them,” said Susan Newton, Senior Vice President of Grants and Programs at the National Park Foundation. “Ensuring that our national parks and historic sites are preserved well into the future is a responsibility that we proudly share with you, and we are grateful to partners like Pendleton for supporting this goal.”

Take a look at the two projects you’re helping to make possible:

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Many Glacier Hotel, Glacier National Park 

Many Glacier, a beautiful Swiss style lodge nestled in an unparalleled mountain panorama in Glacier National Park, is often called the most photogenic of the great National Park Lodges. Pendleton’s contribution is supporting the restoration of the historic lobby of the Many Glacier Hotel, including rebuilding of the helical stairway.

Many Glacier Hotel’s helical stairs were completed in 1917 as the hotel’s showpiece. The grand helix-shaped staircase led to a magnificent upper-floor lake view, but was removed in the 1950s, along with historic lighting fixtures. The removal of the staircase and lighting fixtures led to the gradual degradation of the historic character of this renowned National Historic Landmark.

Nikki Eisinger, Director of Development, Glacier National Park Conservancy, said of the project, “Many Glacier reflects majestically over Swiftcurrent Lake and is often referred to as ‘The Lady’ in our park.  To recreate the historic look and feel of The Lady has been an incredible undertaking. We are so grateful for the support to make these renovations possible.  When the replica of her original iconic helical stairway is installed this spring, and the lobby restoration is complete, we will have truly done this architectural gem a huge historic favor, having restored her to her original grandeur.”

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Grand Canyon Train Depot, Grand Canyon National Park

The Grand Canyon Train Depot in Grand Canyon Village is one of the park’s “front doors,” serving as a major arrival point for thousands of visitors each year and used as a meeting place for adventurers for over 100 years. This National Historic Landmark is one of the park’s most-photographed man made structures. Pendleton’s contributions are helping improve accessibility and preserve the character of this popular landmark for the future.

“The depot is currently open and currently operated by Grand Canyon Railroad,” said Craig Chenevert of Grand Canyon National Park. “The project is quite extensive, and with support from Pendleton we will begin the process to update the depot’s Historic Structure Report. This document will include an updated and prioritized treatment plan that will inform the sequence of future work.”

Progress! It’s thanks to you.

And the helical stairs? Well, just look!

many-glacier-hotel-restoration-img1The Many Glacier Hotel Lobby is being returned to its original and curious decor. Louis Hill’s vision of an East-meets-West style, with Japanese lanterns and log lodge architecture, designed to lure tourists to experience Glacier National Park via the Great Northern Express, will be re-created.

many-glacier-hotel-restoration-img2This photo shows where the floor of the Lobby was filled in over 50 years ago after the removal of the original double helix staircase. By the opening of the hotel next June, the staircase replica will be installed in this spot, and the lobby will be more like it appeared for the first half of The Lady’s life.

It’s really something to see that old footprint for the stairs revealed, isn’t it? A piece of history that will soon be functional and fantastic.

Photo Credit: Glacier National Park Conservancy

Native American Inspiration: The Peaceful Ones and Gift of the Earth

Two of our 2017 blankets are inspired by Hopi culture.

“Hopi” is a shortened form of Hopituh Shi-nu-mu, or, “The Peaceful Ones.” The Hopi reservation covers almost 2.5 million acres of northeastern Arizona, near the Four Corners area east of the Grand Canyon. The Hopi reservation is completely surrounded by the Navajo reservation. Its 14 villages sit on three rocky mesas; First Mesa, Second Mesa, and Third Mesa. The Hopis have lived here for over a thousand years. They follow a yearlong calendar of rituals and ceremonies, and carefully maintain their traditions.

The first blanket is our newest American Indian College Fund blankets, Gift of the Earth, which celebrates Hopi pottery.

Gift of the Earth

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The Hopi have a sacred relationship with the ancient caretaker of the earth, Masaw, and respect every gift given to them. The clay they and their ancestors have sourced from the land for centuries is treated with the utmost regard. Because of this, the Hopi people maintain a beautiful and unique pottery tradition on the mesas in Arizona. Craftsmanship and creativity drawn from generations of knowledge flow through the potters today as they work. This blanket draws on the design elements from these brilliant pieces as a testament to learning from the past while moving into the future.

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(source – photo by Holly Chervnsik)

Interesting facts about Hopi pottery:

  • The golden hues of early Hopi pottery might have sparked the tales of fantastic wealth that lured early Spaniards to the Seven Cities of Cibola.
  • Smooth, symmetrical vessels might appear to be wheel-thrown, but are formed by hand through “coil and scrape.”
  • The most common shapes are shallow bowls and flat-shouldered jars.
  • Paints are made from natural materials, such as tansy mustard and beeweed.
  • Hopi pottery is open-fired with sheep dung and cedar.
  • Today, most pottery is made on First Mesa.

Like all our College Fund blankets, sales of Gift of the Earth help support scholarships to Native American Scholars. Learn more here: The College Fund

Our second Hopi-inspired blanket for 2017 is The Peaceful Ones.

The Peaceful Ones

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They call themselves Hopi, a shortened version of their true name: Hopituh Shi-nu-mu, the Peaceful Ones. Members of this Southwest nation follow the Hopi Way, based on the instructions of Maasaw, the Creator and Caretaker of Earth. The Peaceful Ones strive to be mannered, polite, and peaceable in all interactions. Their path will eventually lead to a state of complete reverence for all things. This design is based on an embroidered Manta, the garment worn by Hopi women in ceremonies that follow the lunar calendar. Through their traditional ceremonies, the Peaceful Ones hope to bring tranquility and harmony to the entire world.

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Interesting facts about the manta:

  • The manta is a rectangular cloth, fastened at the right shoulder and held by a sash.
  • Mantas were originally woven of undyed cotton. Over time, dyed threads and geometric patterns added beauty to the garment’s simple shape.
  • The practice of wearing blouses or shift dresses under mantas came much later, under pressure from missionaries.
  • Once the everyday wear of Navajo, Pueblo and Hopi women, the manta is now worn during important ceremonies.

We are excited to be sharing these blankets soon at  www.pendleton-usa.com.

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National Parks Memories: Babies

We are closing out this fantastic year of celebration with some more national Park memories. These two memories come from Pendleton employees.

Erin is one of our designers. She has this to say about this photo:

Although I don’t remember this, it is a popular story at family get gatherings. This is a picture of me at the Grand Canyon with my mother (Nancy) and aunt (JoAnn). I am recovering from a massive tantrum because my mother would not release me from her toddler hiking backpack. I really wanted to cross the guard rail to get a better look at the Grand Canyon! Obviously my request was not met and I went into a hysterical crying tantrum.

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And, for our last post of the year, here’s a classic shot given to us by Robin, who is head of our bricks-and-mortar stores division:

Timberline Lodge on Mount Hood:  The year was 1957, I was 4.5 years old.  I was visiting my West coast grandparents from New York with my New York City grandmother, Rose Raskin in the Pendleton 49’er jacket, my mother, Mary Bonetta,  and little sister Hillary, age 2. I recall only the gift shop, where I was to receive a totem pole.  Who knew then I would work for Pendleton 45+ years later.  Wish I had that 49’er jacket!

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Two wonderful memories, two fabulous photos and two babies for the New Year.

Happy New Year from Pendleton Woolen Mills!

 

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A Park Memory: Susan Karlstrom for Glacier National Park

Ed. note: Please enjoy this special customer memory from Susan Karlstrom. It’s a special one!

For Christmas this year my husband gave me the Glacier National Park 100th Anniversary blanket.  It’s beautiful with the profile of the Garden wall, as seen from Lake McDonald.  This is the view from my favorite spot on Earth.  The west end of the lake.

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My father was a naturalist for the park. As a child, the day after school was out we hit the road, Michigan to Montana in 3 days.  We had to get to the park to start our summer.

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My brother and I “grew up” in Glacier.  No tv, no phone, just outside and everything the park had to offer.  Woods, trails, streams, rivers, snow, bears, that was our summer adventure.

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My mother was confident in our “bear skills” and always knew we would come home when hungry.  We always did.  Now, I sit with my Glacier park blanket, in Michigan, and tell my children of my incredible experiences in Glacier. I am fortunate that my family wants to return with me to Glacier I and explore it together.

 

I still get a feeling deep in me that says it’s time to go back and to see, smell and feel Glacier, to reconnect with the park.   Fortunately, my husband is ready to go.   Now, my kids look at me and say it’s time to go back.  I could not agree more.  I am thankful it’s in them.

I am thankful that this beautiful blanket keeps us warm and keeps us planning for the next trip to Glacier this summer! The blanket is so special to me.  Someday, I know I will wrap my grandchildren in it and foster their love for Glacier too. Thank you for creating it!

Susan Karlstrom

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See the blanket here: Glacier National Park 100th Anniversary Blanket