Surf Pendleton Style – #surfinUSA

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Surf Pendleton is a growing part of Pendleton’s spring offering, with looks for men and women that feature natural and technical fibers, sun-bleached colors, and relaxed SoCal style. The collection builds on a connection between Pendleton and surfing that goes way back—waaaay back to the birth of the American surf scene in the early 1960s.

This look originally hit the radio airwaves courtesy of the Majorettes, whose song, “White Levis” became a number one hit in 1963. As the lyrics said, “My boyfriend’s always wearin’ white Levi’s…and his tennis shoes and his surfin’ hat and a big plaid Pendleton shirt.”

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That’s a Pendleton shirt  cover of that 45, even though they named the song after the pants. You can give it a listen here, and don’t be surprised if you start singing along.

Around the same time, a group called The Pendletones adopted their name in honor of the surf uniform of the day: Pendleton shirts worn over tee shirts with white Levis or khakis. The original Pendletones lineup included brothers Brian, Dennis and Carl Wilson, their cousin Mike Love, and friend Al Jardine.

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The Pendletones soon changed their name to the Beach Boys . Even though only one member of the group had ever been on a surfboard, they sang about the California surfing scene; waves, sunshine, cars and girls. This might have been simple subject matter, but layered instrumentation and soaring harmonies made these songs anything but simple. Under the unique artistic leadership of Brian Wilson, the Beach Boys defined surf music. And though their name changed, their uniform didn’t. The band wore this blue and charcoal plaid shirt on the covers of 45s and LPs throughout the early 1960s.

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The Beach Boys’ Pendleton shirts were part an existing trend. When surfing came to California in the late 1950s, surfers improvised surf performance wear: swim trunks and plaid Pendleton shirts over a layer of Vaseline. Surfers wore the same shirts over light pants on the shore, and a fashion trend was born.

 

In 2002, Pendleton celebrated eight decades of Pendleton shirts by bringing back iconic shirts from each decade. To celebrate the 1960s, we brought back the Board Shirt in the same plaid seen on all those record covers. We officially named it the Original Surf Plaid.

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The shirt has stayed in the line ever since. We’ve used it in caps, hats, bags and jackets. It’s still made in the original 100% virgin Umatilla wool as it was back then. And this spring, we have your favorite surf plaid in a women’s style.

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See it here: Original Surf Plaid for women

Short sleeved wool shirts have been part of our line as far back as the 1950s. This year, we brought back the short sleeve Board Shirt in spring and summer colors.

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Please note, our good friends at Greenspan’s have always offered custom sleeve tailoring to SoCal customers, so if you shop there, any Board Shirt can be short sleeved. You can check out the short sleeve Board Shirt colors, as well as everything else in the Surf Pendleton line for men and women here: SURF PENDLETON

Remember—summer is on the way.

Beautiful Baskets for Mother’s Day

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You can still get these beautiful baskets in time for Mother’s Day! They make a dramatic accent on tabletops and buffets, and there is a color for every home’s palette. Each one is hand woven by craftswomen in Rwanda using sisal fibers and sweet grass.  Perfect as a centerpiece, fruit bowl, or wall hanging, each basket comes with a weaver profile and helps lift women out of poverty.

See them all here: BASKETS

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Tala Embroidery – Plateau Inspiration

Where does a design originate? in the case of our Tala embroidery, the answer is a long one, steeped in design history from several continents.

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This past year, Pendleton loaned archival blankets to the Maryhill Museum of Art for an exhibit of antique trade blankets. Along with our blankets were incredible examples from private blanket collections around the country. Maryhill is around 80 miles from Portland, home to our headquarters. Many Pendleton employees made the trip up the Columbia Gorge to see the exhibit, and all the other incredible exhibits housed in the former home of Sam Hill. Hill was a true character, an entrepreneur whose vision for the Gorge didn’t quite come together as he planned, but whose ambition resulted in a Columbia Gorge highway, and a stone mansion that now houses the museum.

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By Cacophony – Own work, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3797891

Among the exhibits were gorgeous beaded bags that featured the balanced, complex Native American beadwork of Plateau and Columbia River tribes.

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Floral designs became popular in the work of Native Americans in the 1800s, after students in the reservation schools were exposed to European fabric designs, many of which were influenced by ancient Asian tapestries.  Native American artists were inspired by these previous fabrics, but they added another meaningful layer; they incorporated cultural and religious symbols for their beliefs into the European floral designs, encoding these designs with a secret language of flowers.

Hundreds of years later, our designers were inspired by this beading, which they translated into embroidery. Tracing the inspiration from Asian tapestry to European Chinoiserie fabric to Native American beadwork to modern embroidery shows the importance of textile arts through the centuries. Our Tala embroidery celebrates all these different sources of beauty. See them all at pendleton-usa.com – and don’t forget Mothers Day is coming!

 

 

May the Fourth be With You

starwarsday_01May the Fourth is the fan-driven celebration of all things STAR WARS. Pendleton is doing our part with a STAR WARS blanket giveaway on Instagram. This giveaway will run Friday through Monday. Entering is easy!

(1) Follow @pendletonwm on Instagram.

(2) Tag 2 friends in the comment section of this post: INSTAGRAM GIVEAWAY POST

(3) You’re entered, easy as that!

Entry period ends on Monday, May 7th, 2018 at midnight PST. Winner will be announced on Wednesday May 9th. For complete rules visit: www.pendleton-usa.com/rules

And to help you celebrate even more, all Star Wars blankets are 20% off today. Check them out!  STAR WARS BLANKETS

Celebrate Earth Day with the “Gift of the Earth” Blanket

Sunday, April 22nd is Earth Day, 2018. It is a day to remember the beauty and fragility of the planet we call home.

Earth Day History

The observance of Earth Day came from gathering national support for environmental issues. In 1970, San Francisco activist John McConnell and Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson both asked Americans to join in a grassroots demonstration in support of the planet.  Millions of people participated. Today, Earth Day is widely observed as a time to plant trees, clean up litter, and enjoy nature by getting out in it, through hiking, walking, gardening, or joining the many public observances held on April 22nd.

 

This Earth Day, you can celebrate for a cause with the Gift of the Earth blanket.

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Gift of the Earth features a bold design on a neutral backdrop is inspired by the traditional Hopi potters, who draw from generations of knowledge to create their beautiful, unique works of art. Their work, and this design, pay testament to the practice of learning from the past while moving into the future.

 

“Gift of the Earth” is part of a collection of blankets designed specifically for the American Indian College Fund, many of them designed by Native artists. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of College Fund blankets provides scholarships for Native students to attend tribal colleges and universities. The College Fund has been the nation’s largest philanthropic effort supporting Native American higher education for more than 25 years.

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Photo courtesy of  Shondina Lee Yikasbaa

The weaving video

Watch the blanket take shape, from sheep to loom, in this video.

“Blessing Song” from the album Tribute to the Elders (CR-6318) by the Black Lodge Singers courtesy Canyon Records License 2017-023. All rights reserved.  www.CanyonRecords.com.

The future

The future depends on our careful stewardship of our planet. Those who come after us will live in the world we leave them. Let’s not let them down.

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Photo by @ryanchristopher929, used with permission

Introducing the Olympic National Park Blanket!

Pendleton is proud to unveil our latest national park blanket, celebrating Washington state’s Olympic National Park.

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The colors of this blanket pay homage to the Olympic National Park in our neighboring Washington State. This unique region is famous for its varied ecosystems—from rugged coastlines and dense old-growth forests to glacier-capped alpine peaks and lush rainforests.

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This very special design uses a ground of heather grey with two bands of stripes in muted, natural tones. Fans of our national park blankets can attest to the fact that we don’t usually use heathered yarns in this group, making this blanket uniquely beautiful, just like the park for which it’s named.

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…Diversity is the hallmark of Olympic National Park. Encompassing nearly a million acres, the park protects a vast wilderness, thousands of years of human history, and several distinctly different ecosystems, including glacier-capped mountains, old-growth temperate rain forests, and over 70 miles of wild coastline. https://www.nps.gov/olym/index.htm

Rainforests

Visitors to the Pacific Northwest are often surprised to learn about our rainforests. The entire area was once home to a huge rainforest that stretched from Oregon’s southern coast to southeastern Alaska. Why? Because of our bountiful, wonderful (and sometimes depressing) level of rainfall.

The Olympic National Forest receives 12 to 14 feet of rain per year, with temperatures that rarely dip below freezing or rise above 80 degrees. These temperate, damp conditions allow rain forests to thrive, nourishing an array of vegetation: mosses, ferns, Douglas fir, red alders, Western hemlocks and Sitka spruce. As in all rain forests, downed trees become “nurse logs,” fertile places where seeds grow, animals nest and insects burrow.

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Olympic National Park is home to four rain forests; Hoh, Quinault, Queets and Bogchiel. Quinault Rain Forest is home to the world’s largest Sitka spruce. This tree is more than 1,000 years old, 191-feet-high with a 96-foot spread. Aside from the Redwoods of California, Quinalt holds the largest trees in America—and, a gorgeous lake! Read more about a wooden boat  trip to Lake Quinalt by our friend Greg Hatten here: Lake Quinalt.

Mountains

The Olympic Mountains are part of the Pacific Coast Ranges. They’re not especially high – Mount Olympus is the highest at 7,962 ft (2,427 m)–but its eastern slopes rise out of Puget Sound from sea level, making for a towering ascent. The range’s western slopes are the wettest place in the 48 states thanks to—you guessed it—rain! That 12 to 14 feet of rain we mentioned earlier.

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Hurricane Ridge, at a mile above sea level, offers an unmatched view of the Olympic Mountains. You can observe right there, or take off on hiking trails. You can even take an off-road ready rig up two narrow dirt roads–Obstruction Point or Deer Park—to take in some incredible views of snow-capped mountains.

Beaches

As part of its varied landscape, Olympic NP contains a 73-mile long stretch of wilderness coast. The rocky headlands, beaches, tidepools and sea stacks are wild and undeveloped. Ruby Beach—named for ruby-like crystals that are found in deposits of the beach’s sand–has been attracting artists and photographers for decades, thanks to its unique sea stacks.

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By Adbar – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27301905

Wildlife

We love our animals out here, and Olympic NP is full of them. Old growth preserves provide unique and safe habitat for several endangered species, including the northern spotted owl. Birdwatching in the park is popular, with over 250 species of birds. The mountain meadows draw blue grouse, woodpeckers, gray jays, and more. At the coast, keep your eyes peeled for bald eagles.

On land, several species are found only in the Olympic forests: The Olympic marmot, Olympic snow mole and Olympic torrent salamander. Cougars, bobcats and bears are just a few of the carnivores that roam and hunt these forests. For a full list, see here: https://www.nps.gov/olym/learn/nature/mammal-species-list.htm And don’t forget the ocean. Offshore, the waters that wash the beaches of Olympic NP are home to whales, dolphins, sea lions, seals, and sea otters.

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But that’s not all!

Other things to remember about visiting the area:

  • The Olympic peninsula was once one of the PNW’s best-kept secrets until a certain book series ignited interest in the area. If that’s your jam, Forks is VERY close to the park, as are La Push and Port Angeles.
  • If you would like to set foot on the westernmost  point of the contiguous 48 states, you can do it at Cape Alava, Washington (48.16974° N, 124.73004° W) during low tide, by walking out to the west side of Tskawahyah Island. Cape Alava is accessible via a 3-mile boardwalk hike from a ranger station in the park.
  • Dogs are not allowed in most of our national parks. But Olympic has dog-friendly trails where you can hike with your pooch, as long as you follow a few rules. Read more here: pets in Olympic National Park

So snuggle up in the made-in-the-USA warmth of the Olympic National Park blanket and start planning your visit. The Pacific Northwest wonderland awaits.

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Pendleton’s Cotton Quilts & Blankets for Warmer Weather

Cotton_Quilts_NewSpring is on the way, and Pendleton’s cotton quilts and blankets are a beautiful way to make a home ready for the warmer days ahead.

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This year’s runaway favorite blanket is now a cotton quilt set. Shifting dunes of shining white crystal rise from the Tularosa Basin at New Mexico’s White Sands   National Monument. Erosion from the surrounding mountains constantly replenishes the world’s largest gypsum dunefield, encompassing 275 square miles. During the day, the dunes shine white against the blue sky. At sunset, the sands glow with vibrant hues of twilight, while desert flora—yucca, cholla, rice grass and more – reach toward the last rays of the setting sun.

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New Blankets for Spring

This Spring, we have two new wool blankets that honor two beautiful coastal spots; Falcon Cove and Point Reyes.

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Point Reyes is a magnificent stretch of coast in California.

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The first inhabitants of California’s Point Reyes were the peaceful Coast Miwok, who lived in harmony with the seasons through gathering, fishing and hunting. Spring brought roots, bulbs, nettles, clover and lettuce, and beaches full of kelp. In summer, grasses and flowers surrendered their ripe seeds. Fall brought nuts, buckeye, bay and hazel. Trapping and arrow hunting brought in forest birds, rabbits and deer. Dip net fishing and shellfish harvest provided food year round. The Coast Miwok also used Nature’s gifts as builders and artisans. They fashioned highly sought-after trade beads from empty shells, and elaborate crown-style headdresses made from flicker, the long, narrow flight feathers of a birdwing.

To see one of these beautiful headdresses, we suggest you visit the site of photographer Lee Rentz: Miwok headdress

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See the blanket here: POINT REYES

Falcon Cove

Falcon Cove is a hidden beach on Oregon’s coastline.

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This secluded spot is home to “Magic Rocks Beach,” where ocean-tumbled stones make a rumbling music when washed by the tides. The natural hues of sand, grasses and seaside bluffs are arranged in a balanced pattern that represents the harmony of this beautiful stretch of coastline, where thousands of birds nest each year. This misty, rain-washed country is the traditional home of the Clatsop peoples, one of the many coastal tribes that lived where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean.

To hear the magic rocks (starts at about :43), click here: Falcon Cove video

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Made in the USA

Both blankets are completely woven and finished in our Pacific Northwest mills. They are ready to accompany you on all your spring and summer adventures, so get to planning. Spring is coming!

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Happy Birthday to The Big Lebowski – wearing the Westerley sweater for 20 years, Dude

The Big Lebowski” turns twenty this year, and Dude, we still love it.

The Big Lebowski

Two decades ago, this Coen brothers film was released to low to middling success, but quietly grew into a cult favorite. No one can pinpoint the exact reason why. Was it Donny’s clueless questions? Walter’s chin-strap beard? The German nihilists? The dream sequence scored by Kenny Rogers and the First Edition?

Well, it was probably a grand confluence of all of these important factors, plus the masterful turn taken by Jeff Bridges as The Dude. He staggers in and out of trouble, wearing alternately sweats, shorts, pajama pants, a bathrobe, a purple t-shirt and a battered Westerley cardigan.

Jeff Bridges wore his own clothes for this role, and though there were two sweaters hand-knitted as back-ups, he preferred wearing his personal Pendleton Westerley.

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