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New Video for the “Wild” soundtrack: First Aid Kit and Pendleton

“Walk Unafraid” (originally by REM) is part of the “Wild” soundtrack.  Our Levi’s California collaboration jacket is featured in this video of the cover by First Aid Kit.

“Wild” is not just the number one movie right now, it’s the number one bestselling book on Amazon–years after its release!

The movie was filmed on location, so Oregon’s part of the Pacific Crest Trail is one of the stars, right up there with Ms. Witherspoon. There are some amazing shots near Crater Lake, all the more amazing because Crater Lake national park is only open a short time each year.

So this video is a confluence of a lot of cool things: Pendleton, Levi’s, REM, First Aid Kit, the mighty Cheryl Strayed, the movie “Wild,” the book Wild, and of course Reese Witherspoon.

We are excited!

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UGG Australia and Pendleton–It’s a wrap.

We would like to thank everyone who made our collaboration with UGG Australia such a success; the idea-people in our sales teams, the designers and manufacturers from both companies. Most of all we want to thank consumers for reacting with warmth and enthusiasm to this pairing! It was amazing!

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We are saying thanks with some beautiful shots of Amy Patterson of Amy Patterson Fitness doing yoga in her new boots.

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Beautiful poses, great strength, and the Oregon countryside.

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This collaboration was such a success, who knows what the future will hold? We will find out…down the road.

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Follow Amy on Instagram.

#pendletonpups on Instagram: Connie the Corgie needs his own post.

Connie the Corgi is a blue-eyed charmer with his own Instagram account.

Good morning Instagram! What are you all up to this weekend?

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He has a true love of Pendleton.

Saturday mornings with Connie. He always wakes me up nice and early.

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He is a playful fellow.

Happy Movember! 😛 This is my entry to @ichaity and @pitterpatterfurryfeet's Movember contest #Movember2014Contest.

A photo posted by Connie the Corgi (@conniethecorgi) on

 

And quite well-dressed in his flannel plaid.

On Fridays we wear flannel. #flannelfriday

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When he is worn out, he appears to appreciate relaxing on Pendleton’s Made in the USA wool blankets.

Enough photos, it's time for bed. Goodnight everyone! 💤

A photo posted by Connie the Corgi (@conniethecorgi) on

Home sweet home and quite content to spend the evening snuggling on the couch, catching up on our favorite TV shows. #lazycorgi

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Especially if Dad is around.

Thanksgiving, part two. #after @conniethecorgi #pendleton #YakimaCampBlanket #pendledog #pendletonblankets #madeinUSA

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We think Connie looks like he’s a lot of fun.

Leaving this li'l guy in the morning on work days is the pits. Thank goodness it's Friday!

A photo posted by Connie the Corgi (@conniethecorgi) on

 

Connie, thanks for your brand support. And go fetch that ball.

"What do you MEAN we can't play fetch in bed?"🎾

A photo posted by Connie the Corgi (@conniethecorgi) on

 

 

Some Lindsey Thornburg and Pendleton News

 

 

Lindsey Thornburg is in the news again with her beautiful cloaks made with Pendleton wool. Blake Lively was caught by the paparazzi in a cloak made with the Raven blanket.

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(images courtesy eonline and Us magazine)

You can find this cloak for sale at Blake’s Preserve.us site, where she has curated her favorite American products. And here’s the blanket and story.

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The Raven blanket is a fine example of Coast Indian artistic style. Here’s the legend behind the pattern:

North American Indian folklore reflects the many stories surrounding animal spirits. Every animal has a reason for existence and a legend of how and why they are on Mother Earth. Raven is the counterpart of Coyote. Even though Raven can be an expert trickster, often fooling other animals out of food or shelter, Raven can also be a friend when other animals need help. With sharp eyes, he has a keen skill of knowing when danger lurks. Raven identifies the danger and notifies all other animals in the desert or forest to be cautious or to hide. Raven is a solid reminder and teacher of the good versus evil and is always available if there is a decision to be made. The Blanket exemplifies the black colored feathers of Raven; the red color of potential danger that surrounds him. The blanket is bordered with the Sun, Moon and Stars that are celestial facets of Raven’s life.

 

Lindsey has also done a collaborative blanket with us based on hand-dyed devoré velvet fabric designed by Lindsey and created by Tye Dye Mary®.

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Isn’t that amazing? Lindsey works with so many fabric artists to produce her line, and we are excited to be one of them. We hope you’re having a terrific December, and that you’re staying warm, wherever you are. Like Blake. Who is looking fabulous and staying warm in Pendleton wool.

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Something Very Special for the Holidays: Batik Throws for Pendleton by Tricia Langman

This holiday season, Pendleton is proud to offer a limited edition of work by Tricia Langman, co-founder and design director of Spoogi, an international print design studio based on Portland, Oregon.

Tricia, a British textile designer with West African heritage, grew up in London surrounded by print and pattern. She’s a worldwide teacher of design and technique. She  has designed and produced a unique collection for Pendleton Woolen Mills using traditional Batik techniques from Java, Indonesia.

Trish-BatikTricia hand-draws her original design on a specially produced Pendleton blanket, and hand-paints the design with wax.

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She hand-dyes each blanket in her Portland, Oregon studio.

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Pendleton is proud to offer these works of art in very limited editions, each numbered and signed by the artist.

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Available here.

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“The New West” By Pendleton for Levi’s© Made and Crafted™

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Levi’s© Made and Crafted™ collection for Fall 2014/Winter 2015  takes inspiration from the architecture of Seattle and Portland, two cities that inhabit the wild landscapes of the Pacific Northwest. Natural beauty is almost taken for granted here. Sometimes it takes  appreciation from outside the area to help us remember the wonder of our region.

One city is built along Puget Sound, and the other is bisected by the Willamette River and bordered by the mighty Columbia. The Cascade Mountains tower behind the Seattle skyline, resembling clouds. Both cities sit near inactive volcanoes; Mt. Rainier and Mt. Hood. The designers for Levi’s have used this interplay of  city and mountain, indoors and outdoors, old and new, to inspire their newest Made and Crafted™ collection. The silhouettes, texture and color palette reflect the natural and manmade beauty, with a nod to the Northern Lights for good measure.

Using these deep natural inspirations, Levi’s© has partnered with Pendleton Woolen Mills to portray the  landscapes of the Pacific Northwest with shades of indigo to reflect Levi’s© rich history with denim.

collageThis beautiful blanket is available at Pendleton-usa.com. We suggest you take it along on your next adventure.

 

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Photos by Hunter Lawrence 2014©. All rights reserved by Pendleton Woolen Mills.

Pendleton’s Tamiami Trail Blanket and Seminole Patchwork

Tamiami_Trail_FrntPendleton’s Tamiami Trail blanket has been making some noise this year, showing up on the pages of Lucky:

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InStyle:

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And DOMINO:

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The most exciting appearance was on Blake Lively, wearing a Lindsey Thornburg cloak that you can find on preserve.us.

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That’s quite a bit of press for one blanket. People are responding to the intricate, colorful pattern, but there is a story behind the Tamiami Trail blanket. And it isn’t just a good story. It’s an amazing story about resourcefulness and creativity thriving in diaspora.

Tamiami Trail’s design is based on Seminole patchwork designs used in quilts and clothing. By the end of the Seminole Wars in 1858, the Seminole population of Florida was reduced from thousands to a few hundred. By the late 1800s, most had been driven out of Florida, but small bands remained in the Everglades and Big Cypress Swamp. Seminoles quietly retained their culture — farming, hunting alligators and visiting trading posts along the Miami River with pelts and egret plumes to trade for supplies. Their thatch-roofed homes were called chickees, and they traveled in dugout canoes made from cypress logs.

It was a long canoe trip from the Everglades to trade for cotton cloth. Seminole women began sewing with whatever materials and scraps they could find, including survey pennants, fabric selvedges and end-bolts. The patterns themselves tell stories. Click here to read about  the symbology of these patterns. “Strip clothing” became the traditional dress for Seminole men and women.

Below is a Seminole strip dress from the permanent collection of the Met.

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The sewing machine became available to Seminole seamstresses around the end of the 19th century. “A sewing machine in every chickee” was the rallying cry. Seminole quilting evolved using ever-smaller and more intricate piecing.

In 1928 the Tamiami Trail, the highway from Tampa to Miami, opened. The Seminole saw new trade opportunities in the tourist market for crafts such as patchwork and palmetto dolls.

So yes, This is a beautiful blanket. But its design tells a larger story about a beautiful Seminole artistic tradition. Their entrepreneurial success along the Tamiami Trail is a testimony to Seminole resilience. Strip clothing is still made and worn today, and it’s every bit as beautiful.

Additional information here:

http://www.colliermuseums.com/history/seminole_patchwork

http://www.semtribe.com/

http://funandsun.com/1tocf/seminole/semart2.html

UGG Australia and Pendleton Woolen Mills: a warm and woolly collaboration

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Our newest project with UGG Australia has been received with excitement across America and Europe. Our virgin wool and UGG’s superior sheepskin are adding up to a beautiful collaboration. It’s a natural pairing, all the moreso because both brands have deep ties to Southern California surf culture.

Pendleton goes back to the inception of the surf scene, as we’ve written about while discussing the Beach Boys in their earliest incarnation as the Pendletones. In the late ’50s, before the wetsuit was invented, California surfers wore trunks and a Pendleton shirt over a layer of petroleum jelly to stay warm on the waves. On shore, surfers wore the same Pendleton shirts over khakis, and a fashion trend was born. The Beach Boys dressed like all the boys on the beach, and their signature shirt remains one of our best-selling today.

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For UGG, the story began in 1978 when Aussie surfer Brian Smith landed in Southern California with a bag of sheepskin boots and a lot of hope that his styles would catch on in Southern California. The beaches of SoCal had long been an epicenter of a relaxed, casual lifestyle and Smith’s sheepskin boots  were a hit..

UGG traveled to Portland to select their fabric, and chose our ‘Coyote Butte’ pattern. A million years of history are recorded in the tepee-shaped rock formations known as Coyote Butte, found in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness of Utah and Arizona.

The collection has seven styles; two boots, two booties and two mocs, and one handbag.

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UGG and Pendleton pieces are sold at pendleton-usa.com, US and Asia UGG Australia concept stores and on UGGAustralia.com.

Here are a few shots from the UGG concept store in New York. Love it!

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THE PENDLETON 49’ER JACKET REDUX

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The Nouveau ’49er for Holiday 2014, in a new boucle-accented plaid. See them here and here!

The Pendleton 49’er is a perfect illustration of the adage that quality never goes out of style.

This jacket is an American classic, still going strong after more than sixty years. But where did it come from?

The answer starts with the changes for women in World War II, when American women proclaimed, “We can do it.” Rosie the Riveter’s  WWII image was used in countless posters and bond drives during WWII. A serious woman dressed for hard work with her hair in a kerchief, Rosie’s image still fixes us today, gazing out at onlookers over a flexed bicep.

She was a symbol of women stepping up to fill the need for factory workers during wartime, but she was also part of the emergence of one of Pendleton’s most enduring items of womenswear: the 49’er jacket.

Pendleton’s success with men’s shirts had happened twenty years earlier, but during WWII, men were not the only people enjoying distinctive plaids and ombres in pure virgin wool. Women began to borrow men’s work shirts for both work and warmth. It’s possible that by wearing their husband’s shirts, women kept the memories of their husbands, fiancés and brothers close, though many undoubtedly needed some serious work wear that was simply not available for women at the time. Whatever the reason, women loved Pendleton shirts.

In 1949, when market research identified an opportunity for sportswear for women, Pendleton entered the market with their first women’s line. This was a test offering of classic skirts, jackets and shirt, to test exactly how the American woman would react to a branded line of virgin wool sportswear. The positive response was resounding, but no one could have predicted the enormous success of a single garment introduced that year.

Says Linda Parker, head of Pendleton Communications, “The first women’s line in 1949 was composed of five items.  It is amazing to me that out of such a limited initial offering that the 49’er would develop such an immediate following and reputation.”  The jacket referred to both the year of its introduction, and the California Gold Rush, in a nod to Pendleton’s Western roots.

The designer was Berte Wiechmann, a young woman who came to Pendleton from Jantzen,  another iconic Portland apparel company. Miss Wiechmann sewed the original samples herself, taking styling particulars from the Pendleton men’s shirt. The 49’er jacket featured discreet tucking at the yoke, and two bias-cut patch pockets near the hem. The boxy cut showcased Pendleton’s famous plaids, and larger iridescent shell buttons softened the look.

Miss Weichmann was very particular about these buttons. She insisted on a special black shell from Australia and Tahiti, supplied by J. Carnucci & Sons, NJ.

In 1956 alone, Pendleton would use $150,000.00 worth of these buttons.

Yes. You read that correctly. One hundred and fifty thousand dollars worth of buttons alone, in 1956.

The desirability of the 49’er was immediate, despite the introductory retail price range of $14.95 to $17.95. Says Parker, “We have many testimonials of how young women saved their babysitting and strawberry-picking money in order to buy a 49’er.  Women everywhere had it on their wish list of gifts.” The first consumer was the collegiate girl, who were in the grips of a menswear inspired trend. The 49’er was perfect over a white cotton dress shirt over “trews,” narrow wool pants.

The first print ad for the 49’er ad was done by Fred Love in 1950. A college girl in a MacLamond tartan 49’er pretends to ignore the cartoonish interest of the college boy behind her, snug and stylish in her 49’er. Love continued to illustrate the ads through 1951, when famed illustrator Ted Rand took over the job of communicating the Pendleton 49’er with ads that are still iconically beautiful. He changed the focus from the teenager to the woman, and incorporated elements of the Western landscape when he could.

The 49’er’s simple, casual styling continued to be a perfect fit for the emerging suburban lifestyle of post-war America. During the post-war years, it served as one of the easiest solutions for outerwear over all the Baby Boom baby bumps. Parker explains, “I personally think that Ted Rand shares some of the kudos for making the 49’er a household name with his inspired illustrations.”

Ted Rand began illustrating Pendleton ads in 1953. His elegant women and echoes of the Western landscape moved the jacket from the campus to the suburbs, where it became the staple of a woman’s wardrobe. The popularity soared and knock-offs abounded, to the point where the company had to seek legal protection of the design. Yes, the 49’er is a patented jacket!

The earliest 49’er in the Pendleton archives is a red, yellow and chartreuse version owned by Mrs. Sarah Brourink, who sent it to our archives in the year 2000 after wearing it for 51 years. Here is a vintage example in the exact plaid.

In the years of its prime (1949-1961), over a million Pendleton 49’ers were sold to American women. And it continues to sell well now, after re-introduction in the early 2000s. Collectors still chase after the originals, and beautiful examples can be seen on elated bloggers. Our re-issues do extremely well whenever they are included in a Fall or Holiday line.  Whether in the arresting brights of a bold Buchanan tartan, or the shaded colors of a subtle ombre plaid, the silhouette is still unmistakable. Still made of 100% virgin wool woven in our USA mills, the 49’er works dressed up with a skirt and a belt, or dressed down with jeans. Like a good wool men’s shirt, it serves as a go-to second layer for the backyard or the office.

And we’ve had a little fun with our original archival jacket. We brought it out, compared the specs, and refashioned the original design. Back in 1949 the collar points were a little more dramatic, the back shirring more subtle and the length slightly shorter—all details that give our fashion icon a decidedly modern edge and make it new again.

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Fashion is fleeting, but style endures. The Pendleton 49’er is a perfect illustration of the adage that quality never goes out of style.

 

Editor’s note: This post is an update on a favorite post, just as the Nouveau ’49ers are updates to this classic jacket.

Neil Young Performs in Boston before Pendleton Blankets

These shots came to our attention a little after the fact.

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The blankets, from left to right, are Arrowhead, Compass Stripe and North Star.

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We’ve known Neil Young loved our shirts for a long time. We are honored to be used in a set that transported Neil’s rustic California vibe to the stage of the Wang Theater in Boston.

 

 

 

 

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