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Star Wars and Pendleton Blankets Unveiled for Force Friday

It was a wild party last night, as this shot from our friend Carrie shows.

10603789_10203657373675476_4087456737516796336_nOne of the highlights was the showing of our unveiling video. Give it a watch!

The unveiling that mattered was the blankets, of course. These works of art were designed by Derek Roberts, the gifted artist behind our incredibly popular NIKE N7 blanket. He’s a lifelong fan of Star Wars, and NIKE was kind enough to allow us to work with him on a project near and dear to his heart.

Here are the details. 1977 is a year that forever changed our perception of space, adventure and heroism. In commemoration, Pendleton has woven each blanket in a limited edition, hand-numbered series of 1,977. Each design is available as a single blanket, or as part of a matched-number set of four for the ultimate Star Wars collector.

1

A New Hope

Inspired by the iconic Star Wars poster. Luke Skywalker begins a journey that will change the galaxy, along with Han Solo, Princess Leia, and Darth Vader.

2

The Empire Strikes Back

Darth Vader and the storm troopers have regrouped after the destruction of the Death Star, with Darth Vader leading the hunt for Luke Skywalker.

3Return of the Jedi

Powering into light speed, Luke Skywalker heads a mission to rescue Han Solo from the clutches of Jabba the Hutt, and face Darth Vader one last time.

4The Force Awakens

If you dare, gaze upon a new Star Wars character from the dark side, with exclusive imagery from the newest chapter in the Star Wars saga.

All4The Ultimate Collector’s Set

Purchase a matched-number set of all four blankets. Available only through preorder and for a limited time.

You should preorder soon, as sets and singles are selling briskly for #ForceFriday. Single blankets will deliver 11/25/2015. Matched sets for the Ultimate Star Wars collector will deliver 10/31/2015.

Star Wars and Pendleton for #ForceFriday Fun. It’s on.

Pendleton Star Wars invitation

Come to the party!

We’re closing down Portland’s NW Broadway on Thursday night to celebrate the preorder launch of our fantastic, amazing Star Wars Pendleton product. What’s this product, you ask? Well, we can’t even tell you until #ForceFriday officially begins, but here’s a hint: it’s limited-edition, iconically Pendleton and incredibly beautiful.

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No, this is not the product. You can’t see the product until #ForceFriday.

But don’t forget the party! We’re taking it to the streets!

On September 3rd , please join the #ForceFriday Block Party in front of our Home Store in Portland, Oregon’s Pearl District. The party will happen on Broadway between Davis and Everett streets. What to expect: food carts, costume party, street performers, classic cars, prizes, giveaways, music, movie clips and special appearances. Event goes from 10 P.M. to 1 A.M. Pre-orders for the special product start September 4th at 12:01 A.M.

Star Wars Pendleton

No, this is not the product, either. But it’s so cool that you have to come to the party, yes?

Best of all? If you come to the party, you enter for a chance to win an Ultimate Collector’s set of Pendleton Star Wars product, all yours.

If you want to see the product in person, you need to come to the party; or, you can see photos at our website at http://www.pendleton-usa.com . Preorder there, too!

Star Wars Pendleton

This is not the special product, either. This is your invitation. Use it.

Star Wars. Pendleton. Star Wars…Pendleton…Star Wars! Pendleton! YES!

Can you tell we’re excited? More information on Facebook.

#NationalDogDay: Celebrate Your Best Friend

You can’t bring your dog to work at Pendleton (yet) but we are just as crazy about dogs as everyone else in Oregon. This is a city that loves its canines, with off-leash parks, dog daycares, and businesses that encourage you to enjoy patio seating with your pooch.

When we decided to launch Pendleton for Pets, we went looking for some fine canines to serve as ambassadogs for our new line. We often feature them on our Instagram, and sometimes they appear in your email inbox.

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Since it’s National Dog Day, we’d like to introduce you to our Pendleton Petbassadors.

Leroy:

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Leroy is a photogenic terrier who appreciates the finer things in life, like laps, walks and warm fires. You can follow along with his adventures on Instagram.

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Loki:

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Loki the Wolfdog is an Instagram favorite. He spends most of his time on adventures that take him offleash and off the beaten path. You can follow his adventures on Instagram and Facebook.

Loki2Rusty:

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Rusty Rodas is a charming Golden Retriever who takes adorable photos in clothing on Instagram. When he’s not modeling, he relaxes in style.

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Enjoy National Dog Day, and be sure to check out our line for pets when you can. Your best friend loves Pendleton, too!

PDX Adult Soap Box Derby, ADX Portland, and The Arrow

In early August, we got a shout-out on Twitter from Matt Preston, asking if we’d be interested in helping with the finishing  of his Soap Box Derby car. Matt is part the ADX Portland community, and we will talk more about the derby, but first we want to tell you about ADX. ADX brings together thinkers, makers, students and experts in a shared 14,000 square foot fabrication facility where dreams are made. Once you read about it, you will want to be part of it.

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Now, back to the derby. Each year since 1997, Portland has been home to the PDX Adult Soap Box Derby. According to their website, “Now in its 18th year, the PDX Adult Soap Box Derby continues a beloved summertime tradition at Mt. Tabor Parkl—a community event that draws crowds of 7,000 – 10,000 people to watch a colorful and sidesplitting spectacle of 40+ coaster cars powered only by gravity, whimsy, and attitude.”

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Matt’s entry was framed but not finished.

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Would we be willing to furnish some of our wool to cover it? Oh you bet.

Matt made a trip to our Woolen Mill Store in Milwaukie, Oregon. With the help of our manager, Mary, he picked his favorite. You might remember this Serape pattern from our second collaboration with Doc Martens.

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It wasn’t quite “off to the races” yet. First, Matt went back to ADX for final construction.

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We were delighted to see that Matt was inspired by “The Point,” the Harry Nisson 70s classic.

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Arrow was a great best friend. Here’s a little clip for those of you who weren’t around back then.

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The derby was held on August 15th. We don’t have any images of Matt’s car in action. It was sidelined in a crash! Here’s what Matt had to say about it: The race was a great time and we got a lot of comments on our craft and on the wool covering. Unfortunately, our tire wrecked during the race and so the craft only got one good run in her, but we will be reusing the wool and structure for next year’s race and it will be even better!

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So, let’s all think good thoughts for next year. You can read about the festivities here. And if you want to watch “The Point,” you can do that right here.

You won’t regret how you spent this particular hour of your life.

Enjoy Summer Picnics with Hand-Stitched Home by Susan Beal

Summer won’t last forever, no matter how much you wish it would.

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copyright 2014 by Burcu Avsar

If you’re the crafty type, you might like to take Pendleton along on one of your summer adventures. We suggest you check out this Picnic Blanket, a project designed by the super-talented Stacy Brisbee. It’s one of the projects curated by Susan Beal in her book, Hand-Stitched Home, published by The Taunton Press.

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Susan is part of Portland’s extensive crafting community, and a frequent visitor to our Woolen Mill Store. She blogs at West Coast Crafty.

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As a crafter, Susan appreciates the properties of wool that make it so wonderful to work with. Her book is full of ideas, patterns and advice, with projects geared to all levels of crafting skill. We love everything she’s done with our wool-by-the-yard.

You can find all kinds of beautiful wools for this blanket at  our website. If you’re local, take a trip to our Woolen Mill Store. You can follow Susan Beal here:

blog: westcoastcrafty.com

Instagram: @westcoastcrafty

Buy the book: Hand-Stitched Home

Every Blanket Tells a Story: Louise Kelly

We first saw this blanket when Judy Goodman of Joseph, Oregon, contacted us for information on a blanket that belonged to her grandmother, Louise Kelly.

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The label identified it as a Rainier National Park blanket, but it’s so very different from our current version that we knew it was a special treasure.

Label_web We reached out to our National Park blanket expert, Fred Coldwell of Denver, Colorado. He identified the blanket right away. Here is his information:

The blanket is Pendleton’s very first Rainier National Park Blanket, No. 18, introduced on February 1, 1928. It had overstitched ends and a border design of flowers (lupine, paint brush and daisy) on one of three color bodies (white, light blue or moss green).

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These three flowers are found on Mt. Rainier in these subspecies: Broadleaf Lupine, Dwarf Lupine, Magenta Paintbrush, Scarlet Paintbrush, Subalpine Daisy. They can be seen here under Subalpine flowers in the Blue/Purple Pink/Red folders.

Back to the blanket. Four points (indicating the 66″ x 80″ size) were sewn into the lower left hand corner of the blanket’s large center field. This blanket came in only one size, 66″ x 80″, and was made with virgin wool on a cotton warp. It was wrapped in paper for packing. The wholesale price was $9.00 in 1928 and 1929. This Rainier Park Blanket is listed in Pendleton’s February 1, 1928 Wholesale Price List No. 6 and in the March 1, 1929 Wholesale Price List No. 8. But it had disappeared by 1934-35 when retail Catalog No. 11 was issued. I have no information about it from late 1929 to 1933, but I imagine it was a casualty of the early 1930s Depression.

Ms. Goodman was thrilled to have Fred Coldwell’s information. When we asked her if she’d like to share the blanket on our blog, it spurred her to do some serious family research; not just the names, dates, family tree kind of research, but research into her grandmother’s story. How did she come to the Northwest? How did this blanket tie into her life? The story of a blanket is also the story of the person who owned it. We would like to share Louise’s story, as told by her granddaughter.

My grandmother, Louise Kelly, was born on October 26, 1906 to John and Mattie (Landreth) Evans in Taberville, MO. Like many families of this era, Louise had eleven brothers and sisters. She rode a horse to school and purchased school supplies by exchanging farm eggs at the store. Once she’d finished eighth grade, Louise (at age 12 or 13) had to stay home to care for all the other small children in the family. Some of her brothers were never able to attend school. They stayed to work the farm with their father.

Louise married at the age of 24 and gave birth to her first child (my mother, Wilma) in 1931. My uncle was born a few years later. The family farmed, raised chickens, made their own blankets and clothes, and preserved fruits and vegetables. They managed to survive the Great Depression and were looking at a new future when this photo was taken of Louise in 1941 near Mt. Rainier on a trip to Yakima, Washington.

(Louise Kelly, 1941)

(Louise Kelly, 1941)

The family was taken with the West. Eight years later, the family finally saved enough to move there, settling in Zillah, Washington. My mother was a senior in high school when her father suffered a heart attack. My grandmother Louise found herself widowed with two teenagers. She worked two jobs to support her family, running her own morning café and cooking at another restaurant at night. 

(Louise [left] and her daughter Wilma [right] in front of Louise’s café [obviously the dog didn’t want to be in the photo])

(Louise [left] and her daughter Wilma [right] in front of Louise’s café [obviously the dog didn’t want to be in the photo])

Percy Kelly was a business man who enjoyed breakfast every morning at my grandmother’s café. He was a potato dealer – buying potatoes right from the field, sorting and bagging them in a warehouse in Toppenish, WA, then shipping by rail using “ice” stops along the way to keep the potatoes cool. He had also lost his wife in 1949. Percy asked Louise out on a date, but she was too busy with work and family. One day at the café, Percy took off his suit jacket, rolled up his shirt sleeves and started to wash dishes with Louise just so he could spend time with her. That was the beginning of their love story, and how this beautiful Pendleton Mt. Rainier Blanket came into my possession.

Percy (who I knew as Papa) and Louise were married in 1951 and moved to the Columbia Basin in 1952. They grew potatoes near Winchester, Washington. Papa was a member of the Washington State Potato Commission. They built their own potato storage and started to ship potatoes. This was the beginning of their potato empire, and their life together. Percy had two daughters who were still in high school at the time. My mother started college and her brother enlisted in the Army.

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Louise always loved Mt. Rainier. This photo of the mountain and a CCC camp at its base hung on the wall of her home for most of her life.

It is possible that the Mt. Rainier Park blanket was a wedding gift to Louise and Percy, but more than likely it was a wedding gift for Percy and his first wife in 1929. The blanket remained in the family all of these years. It was often stored in a cedar trunk that came into my possession in 1999 when Louise passed away. “Percy loved beautiful handcrafted things,” his daughter, Jeanette Burk, recently told me in a phone conversation. “He liked well-crafted items made of leather and wool, and he definitely would have wanted this blanket for his family.”

So that is the story of one National Park Blanket and the person (and family) it belonged to.  The blanket spends most of its time displayed in Judy’s Oregon home. Currently, the blanket  is on display at Wallowology (www.wallowology.org) where Judy works. Above it is Louise’s Pendleton 49’er jacket, a beauty that appears to have all its original shell buttons—a rarity. You can pay both of these treasures a visit if you’re in the neighborhood.

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Our thanks to Judy for sharing her grandmother’s story and her photos.

Disneyland and Pendleton Woolen Mills: Happy Birthday, Pardner.

Disneyland is 60 years old this year! Who can believe it?

The history of Pendleton Woolen Mills and Disney began when Walt Disney extended a personal invitation to be retail partners in the Park. Mr. Disney was a fan of Pendleton’s “fleece to fashion” vertical manufacturing, which at the time included ownership of our own flocks and scouring facilities. He saw a fit for us in Frontierland as part of his vision of America’s Wild West.

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frontierland2We were more than excited to be part of Disneyland. Pendleton established a ‘Dry Goods Emporium’ that opened for business right along with the rest of the park on April 17, 1955.

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photo courtesy of daveland.web.com

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The store was a rustic wonderland of Pendleton’s woolen products, along with belts, wallets, hats, and other Western-themed merchandise.

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Much of the clothing sold in Disneyland had its own special labeling that featured the spires of Cinderella’s castle.

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It seems that a new plaid Pendleton shirt was part of the vacation for many young men in America, and the store set a record for sales of Turnabout reversible skirts in the late fifties. Our Disneyland store was phenomenally successful. We had a unique way to share the bounty of the Disneyland store’s sales. Visitors were asked for their postal codes, and credit for the purchase was awarded to their nearest Pendleton store back home.

It’s said that the family that plays together stays together. Well, what does a family who plaids together do? Whatever it is, this family from 1963 is doing it in Pendleton style.

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Holiday_Magazine_Oct_65_Pendleton_11963 was the year that Clarence M. Bishop took his own Gold Ticket tour of Disneyland. The Bishop family is a hardworking bunch, and when they vacation, they tend to gravitate towards places where they can ride or fish. But Mr. Bishop had a great time in Anaheim, according to all reports.

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pendispc1(Please note, these are models, not members of the Bishop family, no matter what the ad campaign says)

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Photo courtesy of Regions Beyond

We’re glad that a trip to the old store remains a favorite memory of so many of Disneyland’s long-time guests. We have been asked, “What happened?” by Disney guests who remember our store with nostalgia. The partnership dissolved amicably when the Disneyland Resort shifted their merchandising focus to more Disney-oriented goods. The store closed in April of 1990. Today, the Bonanza Emporium does carry some Pendleton merchandise, as does Ramone’s House of Body Art.

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In our Heritage Hallway, you can find a framed letter from Walt Disney about the partnership, and a small bronze of Jiminy Cricket. The letter came to invite us to the official press and television premiere on July 17th, 1955.

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The bronze was a gift to us from Disney.

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Jiminy stands on a matchbox wearing a medallion that says, simply, “30.”

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The statue’s inscription reads: “PENDLETON WOOLEN MILLS in commemoration and appreciation of 30 years of association with DISNEYLAND 1955-1985”

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We’re proud of our history with Disneyland, and want to say Happy 60th Birthday to our friends there, and thanks to all the guests who made us part of their visit.

Pendleton and the AICF: Blankets with a Cause

bannerAICFPendleton has been supporting the goals of the American Indian College Fund for years. To understand why this makes us so proud, please watch this video.

If this is a cause you can get behind, you might want to consider our AICF blankets for 2015 as a way to contribute. Both blankets were designed by Larry Ahvakana, an Inupiaq/Eskimo from Barrow and Point Hope, Alaska.

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Born in Fairbanks, Larry was raised in Point Barrow until the age of six, when his family moved to Anchorage. He left behind his grandparents, his native tongue, and many of the traditional cultural influences that had shaped his childhood. But these have re-emerged through his art, becoming the basis for his inspired work.

Larry has been a working artist since 1972. He graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design and the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He also studied at the Cooper Union School of Art in New York. He works in a variety of media, including stone, glass, bone, metal and wood. His masks bring tradition to life with mythic imagery in old-growth wood.

image courtesy of the Blart Museum

Larry is also widely recognized as an educator. He has instructed at the Institute of American Indian Art. He headed the Sculpture Studio at the Visual Arts Center in Anchorage, Alaska, and founded a teaching studio for glass blowing in Barrow, Alaska. His works are included in a large number of major museums, corporate collections, private art collections and as public art commissions.
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Thunderbird and Whale Crib Blanket

The image on this baby blanket is inspired by the artwork of Larry Ahvakana and the Iñupiat legend of the Great Spirit Eagle. Legend states that there once was a massive thunderbird so large and powerful that it could hunt and carry a whale—the main source of sustenance for the Iñupiat. To honor the whale, the Iñupiat created the Messenger Feast. The ceremonial dancing and feasting prepares the community for the coming year and ensures the success of future generations. This blanket is a collaboration between Pendleton Woolen Mills and the American Indian College Fund to honor and reawaken a vital part of Native history. A portion of the proceeds will help provide scholarships for students attending tribal colleges.This blanket is a collaboration between Pendleton Woolen Mills and the American Indian College Fund.

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The Return of the Sun Blanket

The traditions and activities of the Iñupiat, today, as in the past, revolve around the changing of the seasons. This blanket, inspired by the artwork of Larry Ahvakana, celebrates the arrival of the sun back to the Arctic and the start of hunting season. The Iñupiat mark this special time with the Messenger Feast—a ceremony where the spirits of the past season’s harvest are ushered back into the spirit world. Today, the celebration fosters cultural pride and the regeneration of traditional values. This blanket is a collaboration between Pendleton Woolen Mills and the American Indian College Fund to honor and reawaken a vital part of Native history.

You can see all our AICF blankets here: American Indian College Fund Blankets

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Take a Pendleton Mill Tour: From Our Hands to Yours

Nearly every day, we hear from people who have toured our mills in Washougal, Washington, and Pendleton, Oregon. They are impressed by the complexity of the process and the unrelenting noise of a working woolen mill. We are (of course) proud to show off our state-of-the-art mills. That’s why we’re always throwing open our doors to the public. We are working constantly to meet the demand for our fabrics and our weaving capabilities.

You can find information on our tours here and here. Our mill in Pendleton gets quite a bit of press attention, but you can read a detailed history of the Washougal Mill here. But if the Pacific Northwest is not your neighborhood, we offer this virtual tour, filmed at both our mills. We wanted to offer a detailed look at just what it takes to weave a blanket from fleece to finish.

Enjoy!

It’s Pendleton Bike Week in Pendleton, Oregon, and time for Rogue’s Pendleton Pilsner!

Pendleton is growling with bikes today, thanks to the Pendleton Bike Week rally. Yes, if you’ve wanted to explore eastern Oregon on your bike, now is your time. There’s so much going on in; concerts, a bike show, a vendor’s fair. There are giveaways at all the local businesses, including the Pendleton Mill Store.

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Speaking of which, do you see that? That’s a frosty bucket of Pendleton Pilsner, by Rogue Ales. And it’s right there at our mill, which is of course attached to our store, where you can pick up your giveaways as you explore the charming town of Pendleton during the rally. Isn’t the bottle a beauty? It’s a serigraphed with a unique-to-Rogue design based on our Pendleton patterns; the patterns we weave in this very mill.

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We are excited to officially launch the Pendleton Pilsner at some invitation-only events at Pendleton Bike Week on July 25th, and you can taste it at any of the Rogue Brewery Ale Houses on that day.

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Many fine things come from Oregon, including Pendleton blankets and Rogue Ales.  Pendleton Pilsner is brewed at Rogue’s headquarters on the Oregon Coast in Newport, with floor-malted barley grown on Rogue’s Farm in Tygh Valley and Liberty hops grown at Rogue Farms in Independence.

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So if you’re headed to Pendleton for the rally, roll on. We will see you there. And if you’re in Portland, we hope you’ll duck in out of the heat and cool off with our new Pilsner on Saturday.

This brew is pure Oregon.

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