New Child-size/Crib-size Pendleton blankets for 2019

Perfect for Cribs and Cuddles

Enjoy a look at Pendleton’s newest child-sized blankets! These soft wool blankets are made in the USA, and are perfect for crib or cuddle. They also make wonderful wall hanging (click the name of each blanket to see more information at pwndleton-usa.com ).

Shared Paths

This beautiful blanket celebrates the path walked in life, from the helpless dependence of a newborn to the self-sufficiency that comes with growing up.

SharedpathsF&B

Shared Paths legend:

The Navajo word for animals, Naaldlooshii, translates as “the-ones-who-trot-people.” The Navajo study an animal’s behavior to understand and learn from it, knowing that appearances say less than actions. Buffalo is mighty and fearsome, but lives gently by grazing on plants. Fox is supple and small, but lives fiercely by hunting. From Deer to Dove, all Earth’s animals move together on Earth’s shared paths in hózhó, the Navajo state of balance and order.

 

Butterfly

This blanket originated as a robe-sized blanket in the American Indian College Fund collection. In the larger version, the pecan-brown side is the face of the blanket. For the child-sized version, we used the more colorful ombred side as the face of the blanket. Sales of both versions support the work of The College Fund, which provides scholarships to tribal colleges for deserving Native American scholars.

ButterflyF&B

Butterfly legend:

Lakota leader Sitting Bull worked tirelessly for Native American rights. Sitting Bull College on Standing Rock Reservation memorializes his efforts, and demonstrates the American Indian College Fund’s belief that education can transform the future. Sitting Bull’s legacy is honored with flower and butterfly designs similar to those on his regalia. A caterpillar’s transition to butterfly mirrors the transformative impact of education, a fitting remembrance of a man who lived life bravely for his people.

See the full-sized version of this blanket here: Butterfly

 

Morning Cradleboard by Wendy Ponca: Weavers Series

This blanket was designed by Wendy Ponca, a gifted designer and artist who has designed several blankets for Pendleton over the years. It is part of the Weavers Series, which celebrates the artistry of contemporary weavers by incorporating their one-of-a-kind designs into Pendleton blanket designs.

MorningCradleboardF&B

Morning Cradleboard legend:

This child-sized blanket uses a pattern inspired by finger-woven straps used to secure a baby in a traditional Osage cradleboard. Ponca often creates designs that are tactical by intent, offering Nature’s protection. In Osage, the cradleboard is called o-olo-psha, or “follow-trail-of-animals.” The cradleboard was the beginning of the Road of Life as followed by animals to water and food. People take this same path, beginning life as completely dependent, and working step-by-step to self-sufficiency. As the cradleboard protects the baby, this blanket surrounds a child with warmth and safety on the path to growing up.

Big Medicine

Like the Butterfly blanket above, this blanket began its Pendleton history as a robe-sized blanket. The original Big Medicine blanket was a limited-edition custom run, and each blanket contained hair from a rare white buffalo named…Big Medicine. We wove more of the original coloration using only wool, in both the green version and this new re-color with a charcoal ground.

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Big Medicine legend:

The rare white bison occurs only once in every 10 million births. In 1933, a white buffalo was born in the wild on Flathead tribal lands. He was named “Big Medicine” to reflect his sacred power. Many Native American tribes consider the return of the white buffalo as the fulfillment of an ancient prophecy. Tradition spoke of the coming of a herd of white buffalo. The seven bison on this blanket represent the seven directions: North, South, East, West, Above, Below, and Within. Together, they symbolize wholeness for mankind and the earth. Prayer pipes signify mankind’s communication with the Creator. In the center of the blanket, four hands join within the Circle of Life, representing the joining together of the diverse people of the world and a new beginning. 

See the full-sized versions of this blanket here: Big Medicine

See all our child-sized blankets here: For Crib and Child Pendleton Blankets

PWM_USA_label

Greg Hatten guest post – Buell Blankets and the St. Joseph Museum

A guest post!

Today’s post is from our friend Greg Hatten, of WoodenBoat adventure fame. Greg has always been interested in our Buell blankets (all retired, but one is still available), which were part of our Mill Tribute Series. Greg decided to find out some information on the original Buell blankets at the source; his hometown of St. Joseph, Missouri. Enjoy this visit, and if you’re interested in our Mill Tribute series blankets, links to our previous posts are below.

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Buell Blankets Headed West

St. Joseph, Missouri is my hometown. It’s a dreamy little river town that started out as a trading post on the banks of the Missouri and quickly became a launching pad for pioneers headed west to Oregon and California in the mid 1800’s. Some historians estimate that 250,000 settlers made the trek by wagon and on foot between 1850 and 1900. Most of those trips started in St. Joseph or Independence – where final provisions for the 5 month journey were acquired before embarking on the grand westward adventure that started by crossing the Midwestern prairie. Many were leaving for the rest of their lives.

Provisions and Provender

Wool blankets were on the provisions list of every trip – for sleeping and trading with Native Americans along the way. In St. Joseph, the Buell Woolen Mill was the primary source for blankets headed west. Known for quality over quantity, the blankets were strikingly colorful and many designs were based on patterns used by different Native tribes in paintings and beadwork out west. They were prized by the pioneers and Native Americans alike.

Buell-2-slide

As stated in the 1910 Buell Catalog:

Missouri ranks up with the first in the production of good staple wools, and the surrounding states produce a quality almost equal. We buy the choicest lots, have first pick, and train our buyers to get the best… We obtain the best dyes possible that we may produce the required fastness of color, and many beautiful shades and combinations which have made Buell…Blankets the handsomest, most desirable line in the world.

A Visit to the Buell Museum

As I packed for my most recent trip west to run Wild and Scenic Rivers in a wooden boat, a friend of mine asked if I had seen the small collection of Buell blankets at the St. Joseph museum.  I hadn’t – so I made a call to Sara Wilson, Director of the Museum, who is as enthusiastic about blankets as I am about wooden boats and canvas and wool camping.

The next day I visited Sara and watched as she put on cotton gloves, opened a box, carefully lifted out two colorful Buell blankets from the early 1900’s and spread them on the wooden table. Her reverence for these artifacts was touching as she pointed out the tri-colors , the double weave, and the attention to detail that made these blankets so special. I immediately enlisted in her small band of “blanket historians” trying to preserve, protect, and expand the Buell collection in St. Joseph.

Buell-1-table

Setting Out Again

Back home on Lovers Lane, I readied my wooden boat and packed my Land Cruiser for the trip to Idaho across the plains of Nebraska. Among other things, my provisions list included wool blankets from Pendleton Woolen Mills. For my river adventure on the Middle Fork of the Salmon in the Frank Church Wilderness, I chose two blankets to take – a utilitarian camp blanket in slate gray and a colorful Chief Joseph blanket for more dramatic photos of canvas and wool sleeping beside the “River of No Return.”

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Pendleton Blankets

My friends at Pendleton have always spoken of the Buell blankets with the utmost admiration. Pendleton’s  wool blankets have been a part of every adventure I’ve undertaken in the past 15 years. It was pretty amazing to learn about this little thread of blanket history running through the backyard of my home town as I prepared for the first in a series of adventures featuring wood boats and wool blankets on Wild and Scenic Rivers.

 

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If you have a Buell Blanket, images of a Buell Blanket, or a personal story about Buell Blankets, please contact my friend and blanket enthusiast, Sara Wilson, Director of the St. Joseph Museum. You can email her at  sara@stjosephmuseum.org

Thanks, Greg! We hope some beautiful Buells make their way to the museum. And for those of you who would like to read more about the Pendleton series that pays tribute to these blankets, here are the links:

Mill Tribute Series: Buell

Mill Tribute Series: Capp

Mill Tribute Series: Oregon City

Mill Tribute Series: Racine

A storied pattern – Tucson

A 2018 Re-introduction

One of our new robe-size blankets for 2018 is the Tucson blanket. We especially love how the red version came off the loom.

Tucson_www.pendleton-usa.com-red

The Legend Behind the Pattern

The Tucson area was originally home to the Akimel O’odham people, who simply call themselves O’odham, which means ‘The People.” Their creation story inspired this pattern. We have a short version on the hangtag, but the longer version is really quite beautiful.

In the beginning, there was only darkness and water. The darkness congealed, gathering here and there. From these dark deposits, the Creator was made.

Creator wandered above the water, with no destination and no path. As he wandered, he began to think. He became fully conscious of who he was and what he was to do. He reached into his heart and pulled out a magic creation stick.

Creator was unsure of the stick’s use at first. He used it as a walking stick as he strode over the waters. He noticed that resin was beginning to form on the tip of the stick. He took it in his hands, and created ants. So Creator took a large ball of the resin and used his feet to form it into a perfect ball. As he molded the resin, he chanted a song.

Chuhwuht tuh maka-i

Chuhwuht tuhtuh nato

Chuhwuht tuh maka-i

Chuhwuht tuh nato

Himalo, Himalo

Himal, Himicho!

I make the world, and see,

the world is finished.

I make the world, and see,

the world is finished.

Let it go, let it go,

let it go, start it forth!

As he chanted, the ball grew larger and larger, growing until it became the Earth. Then, the Creator took a great rock and broke it into countless pieces. He threw it into the heavens, and the scattered pieces became the stars. He took another rock and made the Moon. But neither the moon or the stars cast enough light.

The Creator reached into his flesh and took out two bowls of water. He thought his thoughts of light. He pulled the bowls away from each other, causing the Sun to appear in the sky. But the sun needed to move. Creator bounced it like a ball to the east, and it bounced back to the west, even as it does today during sunrise and sunset.

Opening Ceremony Memories

Back in 2009, Tucson was one of the most popular patterns in our first collaboration with Opening Ceremony. Remember this? We do!

opening-ceremony-x-pendleton---fall-2009---0

The Tucson pattern is available in blankets, bath and beach, bags, scarves and even a mug. Go see them all here: Tucson by Pendleton

And here’s a look at the tan version–just beautiful. Tucson-www.pendleton-usa.com-tan

 

 

Pendleton label with bald eagle: "Pendleton since 1863 Highest Quality Made in the USA."

The History of Pendleton at Seaside, Oregon – From 1910 to 2018

Pendleton in Seaside

Seaside_store

Circa 1915  – A bunting-draped storefront celebrates the Fourth of July.

We’re excited about the Grand Re-Opening of our Seaside, Oregon Pendleton store this June–June 15th to be exact. But did you know that Pendleton Woolen Mills opened its first retail operation in Seaside, Oregon, in June of 1910?

The store, our very first, was open for “the season”: June through August. Young Chauncey Bishop oversaw the bustling operation that featured an array of products from the mill. From 1912 – 1918, The Pendleton Store continued under the supervision of D. E. Bowman. In 1919, management passed to Walter Jackson, an ailing office manager at the Pendleton Mill. Jackson and his wife ran the store for only one season before he passed away. His wife, Effie Jackson, ran the store ably through the summer of 1920, but elected to stay home with her son when it was time to open the store for business in 1921.

The Seaside Pendleton Store continued to prosper throughout the Roaring Twenties. It closed in 1928. In 2007, Pendleton opened again at Seaside. The current store is located at 1111 N. Roosevelt Drive, #410, Seaside, Oregon, 97138. You can call 503-717-1692 for hours. We’ve just given the interior a new look. Visit us soon to see it all, and to enjoy Seaside the town, the last stop of the Lewis and Clark Trail.

A Little More History

Trips to the Pendleton Archives always yield something of interest, as far as company history. This letter from Fannie Kay Bishop to her sons Clarence and Roy showed her keen interest in Pendleton Woolen Mill’s new retail operation in Seaside, Oregon.

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Fannie Kay Bishop and her son Roy

Fannie Kay was her father’s protégé, and learned about the wool business by his side while he ran the Thomas Kay Woolen Mill in Salem, Oregon. Of her siblings, she was by far the most interested and knowledgeable about the wool trade, but upon her father’s death, the business was left to her brothers. She turned her considerable energies to the raising of her sons. But it was Fannie Kay who saw the possibilities in a shuttered mill in Pendleton, Oregon, and who urged her sons to re-open it to found Pendleton Woolen Mills. Without her, there would be no Pendleton Woolen Mills!

In the following letter, Fannie Kay was discussing the Seaside operation with her sons, Roy and Clarence. The “exhibitions” she referred to were exhibitions at the coming 1911 centennial of Astoria, Oregon. The “Bowman” to whom she referred was D.E. Bowman, a PWM salesman who oversaw the store opening.

To quote, “Bowman has the goods arranged very nicely.  The front windows are not in yet. I suppose they they (sic) will arrive from Portland today. I hope he will do a good business.” She needn’t have worried. The store, open each summer between 1910 and 1928, did a booming trade in Pendleton goods.

Gearhart Park, Oregon

July 12, 1911

My dears Clarence and Roy,

I came up here today to attend the Chattaqua and meet your father on the 10:45 train. I received a letter from him yesterday stating he would be in Portland on the 12:30 pm train. I wrote for him to come down this evening. He could leave Portland at 6:15. I hope he will come. I want to see him so much.

Bowman* has the goods arranged very nicely.  The front windows are not in yet. I suppose they they (sic) will arrive from Portland today. I hope he will do a good business. But the season is very late. Yesterday and today have been bright and warm.

I want to see you so very very much. And hear all about your trip and what you think of conditions. Write to Grandmother Kay – she is quite feeble and often speaks of you boys and wants you to write. I am real well here. Your father and I will go to Astoria next week and make what arrangements are necessary for the exhibitions**.

I received a nice letter from Ruth today and will send it.

I hope that you boys are well – be careful to not get overheated. Take things reasonable easy.

With much love to both –

Affectionately,

Mother

Today in Seaside

We hope you’ll come visit the new Seaside store, where graphics and a timeline go into the shared history of Pendleton and Seaside in more depth. The town sits at the end of the Lewis and Clark Trail. You can feel the history all around you, and since Seaside began as a resort, what you feel is the history of fun.  The Natatorium is no more–the waters of the Oregon coast are so cold that an indoor swimming pool was a huge draw–but the town is full of things to do, like the Seaside Aquarium, the Carousel Mall, Bumper Cars, and the historic Funland Arcade.

Historic Photos of Seaside, Oregon Pendleton

Here are a few images of the old Seaside–come see the new one for yourself!

Circa 1911 –A cozy counter display of Pendleton blankets, steamer rugs (fringed throws), wool socks and men’s hunting jacket.

Circa 1911 –A cozy counter display of Pendleton blankets, steamer rugs (fringed throws), wool socks and men’s hunting jacket.

Seaside_b&w_2

Circa 1911 – Serape-draped tables hold stacks of colorful trade blankets. At rear of store, note the rack of blanket-weight lounging robes for cool coastal evenings.

Seaside_1911

Circa 1911 – An interior view of the store features blanket-draped daybeds. The blanket in the center of the photo was brought back as the Saguaro Blanket in our Heritage Collection, and again as a Muchacho blanket in three colors. All are currently retired.

Seaside_b&wCirca 1911 – Note the rack of wool skeins and basket of knitting needles and crochet hooks. All floor rugs and fringed rugs are Native American weavings.

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Seaside postcard – A hand-tinted version of the photo above was transformed into a postcard that helped tourists commemorate their visit to the Seaside Pendleton Store.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Five Favorite Pendleton Wedding Gifts

Wedding Gifts for Everyone

Summer is wedding season, and June is here. Are you looking for the perfect wedding gift? We have some suggestions to send your newlyweds off in style! Here are our top five Pendleton wedding gift suggestions.

5. Towel for Two

A Pendleton geometric spa towel hangs on a piece of driftwood on the seashore.

The beach is a perfect place to lie side-by-side on the Pendleton Towel for Two. This big, blanket-sized towel is extra plush and soft—perfect for wrapping up together. Pure cotton terry is sheared on one side for softness, looped on the other for superior absorption. Just roll it up and take it along, thanks to the nylon carrying strap (included).

Shown above: Serrado    Below: Tucson   and    Point Reyes

Two Pendleton spa towels, side by side.

4. Motor Robe

Pendleton motor robes draped on Adirondack wooden chairs.

Originally called steamer rugs during the early 20th century, these blankets were a warm, welcome companion for those who traveled by horse-drawn carriage, train or boat. We haven’t been able to verify this, but company lore says that one was included with every new Model T sold by Henry Ford! With roots like that, you can see why this is a perfect blanket for a beginning, including a new marriage. Sturdy, warm, a fantastic indoor/outdoor throw. Each fringed motor robe is still woven in our America mills and comes with a convenient leather carrier.

See them here: Motor Robes by Pendleton

 

3. Bright Mesa Tabletop Linens

A table set with Pendleton Bright Mesa table linens.

Sharing meals each day is thought to be one of the keys to family happiness. Welcome the new couple to this idea with Pendleton’s Bright Mesa table linens collection. Starting the day with breakfast, sharing the day’s happenings over dinner, or taking a leisurely weekend lunch with friends is even more fun when you’re using these bright linens. The design combines iconic Pendleton motifs in a cheerful pattern that brightens up a tabletop with Placemats, Tea Towels, Table Runner and Napkins.

See the collection here: Bright Mesa

 

2. Fifth Avenue Throw

A row of Pendleton Fifthe Avenue throws hang on pegs.

Pendleton’s Fifth Avenue Throw feels like cashmere, but it’s woven from superfine pure merino, then softly brushed to a velvety softness. This top-of-the-line, featherweight throw is our USA mills’ most luxurious. It’s offered in plaids and stripes to match any décor, including the ever-popular Glacier Park Stripe. This throw will last for a lifetime of snuggling on the couch, reading books or watching TV together.

See them here: 5th Avenue Throw

 

1. Heirloom Classic Blanket

A monogrammed Pendleton bed blanket and two striped throws.

 

Simple, chic and timeless, the Heirloom Blanket is the ultimate gift. This warm, fleecy bed blanket is woven from merino wool, and finished with a soft satin binding that’s perfectly dyed to match. Personalize it with embroidery (in any color–including ivory for a subtle tone-on-tone effect) for an incomparable wedding gift that’s made in the USA. The lucky couple that receives this blanket as a wedding gift will use it for the rest of their lives together, and pass it down to their children.

See it here: Heirloom Classic Blanket

And if you’re wondering, it’s hanging with striped Fifth Avenue Throws.

And you can see the rest of our ideas here: Wedding Gifts from Pendleton Woolen Mills

 

Five Best Pendleton Gifts for Grads

Congratulations to the grads of 2018!

We are enjoying photos of graduating seniors who are proudly wrapped up in Pendleton as they graduate.

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Photo courtesy University of Colorado at Boulder, photo by Glenn Asakawa

We’d like to suggest some graduation gifts that range from thoughtful to the gift of a lifetime; something for every graduate on your list.

  1. Notebooks

A set of three to hold thoughts of the past, the present and the future between covers featuring with some of our most recognizable stripes and patterns. See them here:  NOTEBOOKS

notebook

  1. Mugs

Pendleton’s generously sized mug will hold your favorite beverage, and go along to the dorm to heat soup in the microwave. You have so many choices, with mugs that commemorate your favorite national park, legendary mugs that tell stories, and everyone’s favorite Portland mug! See them all here:  MUGS

Pendleton Yellowstone Park mugs on a picnic table in Yellowstone National Park.

photo by @ourfreeways

  1. Water Bottles

A Pendleton water bottle/vacuum flask/

Here’s another shining idea, especially since our water bottles and thermoses are made in partnership with Kleen Kanteen. Your favorite patterns, like Harding and Silver Bark, make these durable and nontoxic bottles even  more special. See them here: WATER BOTTLES

  1. Oversized Towels

A young woman smiles for the camera, posing on the sand on a Pendleton spa towel.

Photo by Nathan Martell for @BedStu

Colorful, beautiful and practical, these towels will tag along on a summer trip or wrap the grad up on the way from shower to dorm room. There are colors and patterns for everyone. See them here: TOWELS

On a clothesline, Pendleton spa towels billow in the breeze.

  1. Blankets

The ultimate gift for your ultimate grad. With proper love and care, a Pendleton blanket will last for generations. In patterns, plaids and stripes, in sizes that range from throw to king, there is a perfect Pendleton blanket for every grad on your list: Motor Robes for the sports fan. National Park blankets for the environmentalist. Camp blankets for the lover of the great outdoors. And a library of dazzling traditional patterns, each with a story to tell.

A woman stands by the sore of the lake at sunrise, wrapped in a plaid Pendleton throw.

Photo by Levi Dunn, @thefreestate

Browse the best here: Pendleton blankets

And congratulations to everyone!

2018-Graduates-of-NACC

Photo courtesy Colorado State University Native American Cultural Center

New Blankets for Spring

Celebrating the Coast

This Spring, we have two new wool blankets that honor two beautiful coastal spots; Falcon Cove and Point Reyes.

A picnic set up on Pendleton blankets

Point Reyes

Point Reyes is a magnificent stretch of coast in California.

Chimeny Rock on Point Reyes, Californiaphoto by King of Hearts (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0] https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

The first inhabitants of California’s Point Reyes were the peaceful Coast Miwok, who lived in harmony with the seasons through gathering, fishing and hunting. Spring brought roots, bulbs, nettles, clover and lettuce, and beaches full of kelp. In summer, grasses and flowers surrendered their ripe seeds. Fall brought nuts, buckeye, bay and hazel. Trapping and arrow hunting brought in forest birds, rabbits and deer. Dip net fishing and shellfish harvest provided food year round. The Coast Miwok also used Nature’s gifts as builders and artisans. They fashioned highly sought-after trade beads from empty shells, and elaborate crown-style headdresses made from flicker, the long, narrow flight feathers of a birdwing.

To see one of these beautiful headdresses, we suggest you visit the site of photographer Lee Rentz: Miwok headdress

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See the blanket here: POINT REYES

Falcon Cove

Falcon Cove is a hidden beach on Oregon’s coastline.

"Magic Rocks Beach" at Falcon Cove on the Oregon coastline

This secluded spot is home to “Magic Rocks Beach,” where ocean-tumbled stones make a rumbling music when washed by the tides. The natural hues of sand, grasses and seaside bluffs are arranged in a balanced pattern that represents the harmony of this beautiful stretch of coastline, where thousands of birds nest each year. This misty, rain-washed country is the traditional home of the Clatsop peoples, one of the many coastal tribes that lived where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean.

To hear the magic rocks (starts at about :43), click here: Falcon Cove video

Front and back views of the Falcon Cove blanket by Pendleton

Made in the USA

Both blankets are completely woven and finished in our Pacific Northwest mills. They are ready to accompany you on all your spring and summer adventures, so get to planning. Spring is coming!

Pendleton_Spring_Blankets

A Blanket for Your Little Star, Born in the Year of the Eclipse

Five Pendleton child-sized blankets hang on pegs.

Pendleton child-size blankets

…can help you celebrate a baby born during the eclipse year, or just wrap your little star watcher in something wonderful. We weave blankets that tell stories, and we want those stories to be told for generations. A Pendleton child’s blanket will warm your children, and their children, and the children who come after—and will definitely be around for the next full solar eclipse in April of 2024!

Star Guardian

Pendleton Star Guardian child-sized blanket.

Crossed arrows stand for brotherhood and the setting aside of conflicts. A peaceful evening has come to the prairie. It is time to light the fires and draw together in the warmth of the fire circle. As logs crackle and flames flicker, stories rise on the night air. Stories of bravery and victory in battle. Stories of stealth and bounty in the hunt. Stories of tricksters and their clever magic. As they share their legends, the People are safe and warm in their tepees. Above it all shines Bear, the great guardian of the night skies.

Chief’s Road

Pendleton

Chippewa-Cree artist Jesse Henderson designed this blanket of the Milky Way, or “Chief’s Road,” exclusively for Pendleton. The Big Dipper and North Star shine brightly. Bear and moose tracks border the sky. Below, rows of lodges represent the children of the Creator and Mother Earth.

Sons of the Sky, Daughters of the Earth

These designs were created in partnership with Virginia Stroud, an acclaimed contemporary Native American artist. Every purchase helps support the honorable mission of the American Indian College Fund, a nonprofit organization that helps fund scholarships for Native American students and tribal colleges. Both designs honor a significant Plains indian tradition: Parents place a newborn child’s umbilicus inside a turtle of lizard-shaped amulet that embodies the turtle’s hard shell or the lizard’s quick movement. This guards the child’s spirit to ensure a long, protected life.

Sons of the Sky

ZE786-52008-Sons-Of-The-Sky-MuchachoThe central turtle amulet is surrounded by celebratory stars and rainbows in honor of new birth.

Daughters of the Earth

Pendleton Daughters of the Earth child-sized blanket.Water lilies and dragonflies surround a lizard amulet on a soothing rainbow that evokes a marsh sunset.

Raven Sunburst

Pendleton Raven Sunburst child-sized blanket.

According to a Steilacoom legend, in the beginning, Grey Eagle kept the sun, moon, stars, fresh water and fire hidden from the people. Then Raven fell in love with Grey Eagle’s beautiful daughter. To please her, he turned himself into a snow-white bird, so she invited him into her father’s lodge. When Raven saw the sun and moon, he stole them and escaped through a smoke hole in the house. Outside, he hung the sun in the sky and flew away. At night, he put up the moon for light and kept on flying, carrying with him a stick of fire. Soon the smoke from the fire drifted over his back, turning his white feathers black.

Wild Horses

Pendleton Wild Horses child-sized blanket.

Thundering hooves raise clouds of dust as wild mustangs gallop across the valley floor. These graceful creatures epitomize the free spirit of the West, standing as symbols of pride and tradition for many Native Americans. As the sun sets, stars shine against the vivid colors of the evening sky. This design celebrates independence, strength and mobility, all traits of the wild horse.

And so many more

We have so many choices for your young ones. You can see them all here: Child-sized Pendleton blankets   These blankets are 32” x 44”, perfect for a crib or a snuggle. And they are 100% made in the USA.

Two girls sit on blankets atop a rock wall.

Sky Stories: Pendleton Blankets for the 2017 Eclipse 

The Eclipse is Coming!

If a beautiful Pendleton blanket is part of your plan to celebrate and commemorate the upcoming full solar eclipse, we are here with some suggestions! We’ve been weaving blankets that tell stories for over a century, and some of our most beautiful designs celebrate the night skies. All of these wool blankets are made in the USA.

Here are our Sky Stories.

Night Dance

Night-Dance-blanket by PendletonNight falls as dancers gather on the Square Ground for the Stomp Dance, performed by many tribes: Caddo, Seneca, Muskogee, Cherokee, Shawnee, Seminole and more.  Against the dark blue of the night sky, the bright flames of the ceremonial fire rise.  Mother Fire is considered a sacred being who watches over the dancers and receives their songs and prayers. The Chief calls upon his medicine man and speaker to help him lead this sacred gathering. Men take their places in arbors built facing each of the Four Directions. With traditional and treasured turtle-shell rattles fastened to their legs, dancers begin their shuffle and stomp. Strong medicine and the repetitive steps of the Stomp Dance lead them to an inspirited, meditative state. The night echoes with the haunting call and response of their special songs. The Stomp Dance lasts until morning arrives to fill the sky with colors of Dawn.

Full Moon Lodge

Full Moon Lodge blanket by PendletonThis design was created in partnership with Muscogee Creek artist Starr Hardridge, and is part of our Legendary Collection. This design illustrates the relationship between humankind, Mother Nature and the creator of the universe, whose medicine is love. It acknowledges our place between the sun and the full moon. Full Moon Lodge is part of our Legendary Collection, which honors stories and symbols of Native American cultures.

Pueblo Dwelling

Pueblo Dwelling blanket by PendletonThis is a vintage design from 1923, the heyday of trade blanket production. Dazzling colors and geometric designs tell a story. Arrows symbolize the paths of life and power. Stars centered in squares echo the bright Morning Star, a spirit honored by many pueblo dwellers. This blanket is part of our Heritage Collection.

Star Wheels

Star Wheels blanket by PendletonHigh atop the Big Horn Range in Wyoming sits one of the best-known medicine wheels or sacred hoops. This spoked circle of stones was created by Plains Indians between 300 and 800 years ago. Astronomers have noted that during the summer solstice, the spokes of the wheel point to the rising and setting of the sun, and four bright stars, a discovery celebrated by astronomers.

Northern Lights

Northern Lights blanket by PendletonThe Northern Lights are as mysterious as they are glorious. Native legends offer intriguing explanations for these shining bands of transparent color that dance across the night skies. To the Fox tribe of Wisconsin, the lights were an omen of war, spirits of enemies rising up to do battle again. To their neighbors, the Menominee tribe, the lights belonged to torches carried by the manabai’wok, giant spirits of hunters and fishermen that were out spearing fish.  Northern lights are most visible at midnight in the extreme north, and occasionally seen as far south as America’s Gulf Coast.

Gatekeeper

Gatekeeper blanket by PendletonThe Gatekeeper is an original Pendleton design from 1935. This USA-made wool blanket is a beautiful example of a Center Point pattern, which contains a primary design element that falls within a band through the center of the blanket. The eight-point star is a common motif in Sioux culture and often represents the morning star, signifying a new beginning with the break of dawn. As gatekeeper of the morning, it shows the way to the light and knowledge of the day.

Stella Maris

Stella-Maris blanket by PendletonStar of the sea, or Stella Maris, represents the guiding presence of the North Star. As a ‘pole star,’ it shines an abiding light by which sailors have navigated for as long as man has traveled the sea. The graduated palette of indigo, lapis, turquoise and ivory unfolds in a dynamic chevron pattern that evokes the emanation of starlight in the night sky, recalling the traditional craft of Star Quilts. Designer Alyssa Pheobus Mumtaz is an American artist known for her multimedia drawing practice, inspired by iconography of traditional textiles. Her work is exhibited worldwide and recognized by numerous fellowships and grants.

Journey West

Journey West blanket by PendletonThis dynamic blanket celebrates the pioneering spirit of our founder, weaver Thomas Kay, who journeyed to America from England, arriving in Oregon in 1863. Its design was inspired by a blanket discovered in a 19th-century European mill which included the designer’s notes and calculations handwritten neatly along the sides. The pattern highlights the universal appeal of geometric shapes and lines. The hooked patterns inside the large diamonds are common symbols of luck and prosperity. Its quality and beauty is a tribute to the generations of weavers that have continued Thomas Kay’s legacy of quality and excellence.

A young woman wrapped in a Journey West blanket stares at the horizon, with the words "Solar Eclipse Giveaway"

We’re having a gift card giveaway on Instagram over the weekend–starting tomorrow. If you win, which blanket would you choose?

10 Cutest Pictures of Pendleton Pets

Fun fact: Pets love wool.

If you have a wool blanket, your cat has probably “claimed” it as her own (and immediately covered it in fur). Cats and dogs are drawn to wool because it’s breathable and regulates heat, which keeps them cool in summer and warm in winter. An added plus for pet-lovers is that wool also naturally resists germs and dirt. Plus, it’s just plain cozy!

We’ve rounded up 10 of the absolute cutest photos of cats and dogs enjoying Pendleton gear, from wool blankets and throws to our new pet beds, leashes, collars and more. So take a few minutes for a cuteness break, and tell us which one is your favorite in the comments!

Our top ten

There’s nothing better than a puppy, except maybe a puppy asleep on a Pendleton throw. Lucy, an apricot goldendoodle in Washington, dozes off on a pure virgin wool motor robe. Sweet dreams of bagel crumbs and chin scratches, Lucy.

A goldendoodle puppy asleep on a Pendleton throw.

Photo: @lucy_da_gooldendoodle

 A sleeping cat and kiddo? It’s almost too much to handle. They’re curled up on a Glacier Park knit throw in fuzzy cotton and merino wool. Ahh.

A baby and an orange cat sleeping on a Pendleton striped throw

Photo: @burtsbrisplease

We had to give some love to fellow Oregonian Thomas Guy, who took this photo of his significant other and their aptly named doodle, Laura Darling. The dog looks so soft and fluffy in our Glacier Park dog coat!

A young woman kisses her goldendoodle puppy

Photo: @thomasguy

 Lauren Gordon was originally was fostering these two kitties, Peanut and Penelope, but she fell in love with them and adopted them. Here they are on an aqua Chief Joseph blanket. (We wouldn’t have been able to resist, either.)

Two very young little kittens on a Chief Joseph Pendleton blanket

Photo: @laurenlucybean

Rooster, a Great Pyrenees, protectively cuddles newborn baby Poe as they nap on a Pendleton dog bed in Washington, D.C.

A Gret Pyrenees dog keeps her baby very safe on her Pendleton dog bed.

Photo: @tallulahalexandra

 Why are sleeping animals so cute? Barcelona photographer Raquel Fialho captured the adorable Flor (Portuguese for “flower”) snoozing on our Chief Joseph pillows in aqua and turquoise.

A small orange kitten sleeps on a pile of Pendleton Chief Joseph pillows.

Photo: @raquelfialho

 Petee the Siberian husky, shown here with one of his humans, is an Ontario pup who loves outdoor adventures—and also Pendleton’s striped leash and travel bowl!

A young man gives his husky a drink from a tin coffee cup.

Photo: @peteethehusky

Oreo the Biewer Yorkie peeks out from a Glacier stripe blanket. Clearly the tiny Bay Area pup has excellent taste.

A tiny Yorkie pup peeks out from a Pendleton Glacier Park blanket.

Photo: @oreo.bb

 You can’t help but smile at Cooper, a Pembroke Welsh Corgi in San Francisco who likes romping around in the snow while his national park dog coat keeps him toasty.

A happy corgi named Cooper poses in a snowy forest, wearing his Pendleton Pet dog coat.

Photo: @littlecooperbear

Streeeetch! Peanut relaxes on a Yakima camp blanket on a lazy sunny day. Excellent idea, Peanut.

An orange cat gives a good stretch on a Pendleton Yakima Camp blanket.

Photo: @babyconstellation

 OK, which furry friend is the cutest in your book? We absolutely can’t choose. 

If you’d like to see our Pendleton Pet products, click here: Pendleton for Pets

And for more aww-worthy photos of pets and Pendleton, follow us on Instagram.