Retiring Pendleton Blankets for 2019

Buffalo Wilderness Fence

Every year, we retire some of our blanket designs to make room for more. This year, we have some beautiful blankets saying good-bye. You’ll find neutral geometric designs that have become so popular, like Beargrass Mountain and Santa Clara. You’ll also find the bold and colorful geometric designs for which we are so well-known, like Arrow Revival and Eagle Gift. Baby blankets, knitted throws, collaborations and so much more—take a look! Go here to see the full selection: Retiring for 2019

Below are some favorites that you won’t want to miss, all woven and manufactured in the USA in Pendleton’s Pacific Northwest mills.

Neutral Geometrics

Compass Point

This contemporary pattern also comes in a throw that features a central Greek cross. Shee it here: Compass Point Throw

Compass point

North, South, East, West; these are the Cardinal Directions, immortal points on the compass. In this contemporary pattern, each arm of the Greek cross reaches toward one of Earth’s Four Corners, pointing the way to wealth, knowledge and relaxation. Sailors traveled North on high waves to fish the icy waters, South to breathe the balmy air of the Tropics, East to load their ships with profitable trade goods and West to encounter new lands, new dangers, new opportunities. The compass points guide every ship’s journey, showing a path to adventure.

Santa Clara

Subtle hues that echo adobe architecture make this blanket versatile.

Santa Clara

In 1777, Franciscan padres established Santa Clara Mission in California’s fertile Santa Clara valley. It was supported through the labors of the Tamyen, Ohlone and Costanoan peoples. When the mission system ended, Santa Clara Mission continued to serve as a place of worship. The church was destroyed three times, but has always been rebuilt. In 1926, the current structure was constructed with the distinctive architecture and subtle stucco hues echoed in this design.  Today, Mission Santa Clara de Asís serves as the chapel on Santa Clara University campus.

Colorful Geometrics

Southern Highlands

This pattern has been a hit in our Baggu collaboration!

Southern Highlands

Southern Highlands celebrates the traditional craft of wool coverlet weaving as practiced by the women of the Appalachian region of the Southeastern United States. Appalachians settled in remote hills and valleys, and survived by hunting, gathering and small-scale agriculture. Their rustic cabins were filled with objects made from materials at hand.  For coverlets, women grew flax and cotton on the same property where sheep were raised for wool. Hand-carded and spun, with dyestuffs derived from walnut shells, indigo and other colored flora, coverlets were hand-loomed in the four-harness overshot method. Traditional colors were blue, red and green, woven on a white or cream warp. Patterns range from circles to intricate geometric eye-dazzlers. The woven coverlet inspired great artistry in Appalachian weavers. Today, their work is admired and preserved in museums and collections across the country.

Hacienda

It’s hard to say farewell to this one; Hacienda is a popular blanket that has been in the line for a decade.

hacienda

Timeless geometric shapes give universal appeal to the nine-element design in this USA-made wool blanket. The stripes, crosses, triangles and diamond motifs in this pattern are interpretations of the symbols common in many early Navajo blankets. Crosses represent completeness and the four directions: North, West, South and East. Arrows signify movement, power and life force. Like traditional Navajo designs, this pattern continues to the edges of the blanket to prevent evil spirits from being trapped within.

Pictorial Blankets

Buffalo Wilderness

The great Plains Bison is the star of this blanket, one of many we’ve woven to celebrate the buffalo. You can see more retired examples here: Buffalo blankets

Buffalo Wilderness

This design honors a time when millions of bison roamed North America’s grassy plains. Today our National Parks protect the last remaining wild herds. One of the largest herds of free-ranging wild buffalo lives in Yellowstone National Park. It’ thought to be the only place in the United States where bison have lived continuously since prehistoric times. You can also see herds in Badlands, Grand Teton, Theodore Roosevelt and Wind Cave National Parks.

Full Moon Lodge

This design plays on the luminous combination of blue and orange. Learn more about the artist behind the blanket here: Starr Hardridge

Full Moon Lodge

A USA-made wool blanket created in partnership with artist Starr Hardridge. This design illustrates the relationship between humankind, Mother Nature and the creator of the universe whose medicine is love. It acknowledges our place between the sun and the full moon. Part of our Legendary Collection, this design honors stories and symbols of Native American cultures.

So get them while they’re here—they are saying good-bye soon!

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Photo by Kristen Frasca

http://www.kristenfrasca.com/

https://www.instagram.com/kristenfrasca/

 

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