Stanley x Pendleton for 2023 – Take it Outside!

A Quality Partnership

Stanley x Pendleton tumbler in a woman's hand

We are excited about the newest additions to our partnership with Stanley, the first name in insulated bottles. This partnership brings together two iconic companies, both in business for over a century, with strong commitments to utility and quality. It adds some exciting new choices: a pour-over set for perfectly brewed camp coffee and a stackable insulated tumbler, perfect for your other favorite brews. Stanley is a wonderful company to work with and the results are, well, outstanding!

The Patterns

Four insulated bottles, Stanley x Pendleton

Let’s take a deep dive into the patterns, including two patterns that generate donations to worthy causes related to the Great Outdoors.

National Park Stripe

National Park Stripe Stanley x Pendleton bottles

Pendleton Park Stripes celebrate America’s Treasures, with a portion of sales supporting the work of the National Park Foundation, the charitable partner to the National Park Service. Pendleton’s National Parks Collection helps to fund restoration and preservation projects, including the Grand Canyon Train Depot (still underway), the Many Glacier Hotel’s helical stairway (now completed) and the newest project, the Desert View Heritage Center.

See the entire collection: Pendleton for the National Parks

Wildland Heroes

Wildland Heroes Stanley x Pendleton bottles

Each year, crews of firefighters fight wildfires throughout America, protecting private and public lands. Sales of Wildland Heroes products generate a donation to the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, which helps the families of firefighters who are killed in the line of duty, and assists injured firefighters and their families. 

See products that support this cause here: Wildland Heroes

These two patterns join two more:

Rob Roy

rob Roy Stanley x Pendleton bottles

Is it a tartan, or is it a plaid? In this case, it’s both. Also known as ‘Old MacGregor’, The ‘Rob Roy’ tartan is not officially registered with the Society of Tartans, but is associated with Scottish folk hero Rob Roy MacGregor. It’s also known as Lumberjack Plaid, Buffalo Plaid, and Buffalo Check. Whatever you call it, this red and black check evokes the Great Outdoors like no other pattern.

Rob Roy blanket (and throw and more) here: The Rob Roy pattern

Yakima Camp stripes

Yakima camp stripe  Stanley x Pendleton bottles

Pendleton Camp stripes evoke the outdoors in colors that reflect Western landscapes: forests, lakes, river gorges, coastal crags, and the rich colors of the high desert. Pendleton’s camp blankets were based on the ombre-striped bedrolls used by cattle hands and shepherds. During the day, they were tightly rolled and tied to saddles or packs. At night, their warm wool made for cozy sleeping under the stars.

See all the stripes here: Yakima Camp Stripes

Learn More

See the entire collection here: Stanley x Pendleton

Learn more about our partnership with the NPF here: Pendleton and the NPF

Read more about our latest project here: Desert View Heritage Center

Learn more here: Wildland Firefighter Foundation

All about Stanley: Stanley1913

Enjoy your time outdoors with Stanley and Pendleton, and thank you for taking us along.

Fire lookout

Journey West Through the Years

A Journey West

Master weaver Thomas Kay began his training as a bobbin boy in English mills before coming to America to establish the family legacy that led to Pendleton Woolen Mills. His journey was a rugged one. He traveled down the Atlantic seaboard, crossed the Isthmus of Panama on a burro, and sailed up the Pacific on a grueling four-month passage. Yet for Thomas Kay, a young English weaver, it was a dream come true. We have commemorated his travels with the Journey West pattern.

For 2023, we are excited to unveil a new coloration of the Journey West blanket.

The new 2023 version of the Pendleton Journey West blanket.

This is the third coloration of a favorite pattern. This dynamic blanket celebrates the pioneering spirit of our founder, weaver Thomas Kay, who journeyed to America from England, arriving in Oregon in 1863. Its design was inspired by a blanket discovered in a 19th-century European mill. The pattern highlights the universal appeal of geometric shapes and lines. The hooked patterns inside the large diamonds are common symbols of luck and prosperity. Its quality and beauty is a tribute to the generations of weavers that have continued Thomas Kay’s legacy of quality and excellence.

See it here: Journey West 2023

Craftsman Journey West (retiring 2023)

In 2020, Journey West was chosen to be part of the Craftsman Collection, a special capsule of blankets that celebrated the history, artistry, and craftsmanship of our blankets. For this version, the pattern was recolored and specially dyed to evoke the natural fading of a vintage blanket. One side of the blanket was napped for softness and warmth. The reverse was left unnapped, to showcase the geometry of the pattern. Hand-cut rounded corners recalled the shape of blankets from the earliest days of the mill. For the introduction, we chose three patterns with stories to tell; Canyonlands, Journey West, and Sierra Ridge.

Learn more about this collection here: The Craftsman Collection

Here is the version of Journey West unveiled with the Craftsman Collection.

Pendleton Woolen Mills blanket, the Craftsman Collection version of Journey West.

Here you can see the blanket being hand-trimmed for this special edition.

This blanket is retiring this year, and a limited amount are still available at Pendleton-usa.com – see the blanket here: Craftsman Collection Journey West

The Original Journey West

The Journey West blanket premiered in 2013. It is officially retired, but still available in limited quantities.

original version of the Journey West blanket

As mentioned before, the Journey West pattern is based on a piece of fine European weaving. The original blanket was discovered recently in a 19th-century European mill and included the designer’s notes and calculations, handwritten neatly along the sides. Our modern Pendleton designers viewed this historic work of art with reverence and used it as inspiration. This original gold and red coloration has been popular since its introduction. Our designers have used it in many different apparel styles like the women’s limited edition Cardwell jacket.

Women's limited edition Cardwell jacket in Journey West pattern.

This complex and beautiful design has also graced towels, dinnerware, oversized mugs, and other items. We love them all, but do you have a favorite?

See the current selections here: Journey West

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"Born in Oregon" logo

Happy National Park Week from Pendleton Woolen Mills

1.5M and growing

As we mentioned in our last post, our partnership with the National Park Foundation is thriving.

Thanks to all of you for your part in making this partnership a success.

The NPF works tirelessly to protect the parks and monuments that preserve America’s beauty for future generations. And National Park Week is a celebration of their efforts. You can learn more at this page, which offers so much information about just what’s included in this special week:

https://www.nationalparks.org/theme/national-park-week

We hope you’ve had a chance to get out there. If not, there is always this weekend!

Shop here: Pendleton for the National Parks

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We Celebrate National Park Week with a Contribution Milestone!

Now, that’s a celebration.

Pendleton National Park blankets on a wooden fence in front of glaciers

We are celebrating National Park Week 2023 with a donation milestone of over $1.5 million in contributions to the National Park Foundation since 2016. Through sales of the National Park Collection, Pendleton is proud to support the National Park Foundation, the nonprofit dedicated to protecting and preserving America’s more than 400 national parks.

Our Projects

Pendleton’s partnership has supported two landmark park preservation projects. Our first project was in Glacier National Park, at the beautiful Many Glacier Hotel. Restoration of the historic lobby included rebuilding the iconic helical staircase, which had been displaced by a gift shop.

Read more here: Helical Stairs

Our second project is restoration and preservations of the historic Grand Canyon Train Depot in Grand Canyon National Park. The historic station is a landmark. Its restoration is currently ongoing, with a special focus on enhancing the accessibility so all guests can enjoy the train.

Read more here: Grand Canyon Depot

We are excited to announce a new project. We will be contributing to the development and support of the Desert View Inter-Tribal Cultural Heritage Site at Grand Canyon National Park. This includes the Desert View Watchtower, designed by architect Mary Colter.

Read more here: Desert View Heritage Center

Committed to the Future

“The national parks have been an important part of Pendleton’s heritage from the very early days,” said Pendleton CEO John Bishop. “Our National Parks Collection dates back to 1916. It is an honor to be able to continue to partner with the National Park Foundation to help support the inspiring work they do across our treasured national parks.”

We couldn’t do it without you. Thank you all for your support.

Blue "Born in Oregon" logo

Many Nations for the American Indian College Fund

2023

Pendleton and The College Fund are excited to present the new blanket for 2023: Many Nations, a design by Dustin Lopez. Dustin is a student at Diné College pursuing a Bachelors of Fine Arts degree. His winning design was selected from 107 entries.

Many Nations. a College Fund blanket designed by Dustin Lopez

Many Nations

Many Nations pays tribute to the Indigenous person representing more than one tribe. An indigenized version of DNA frames the initials ‘M’ and ‘B’ to create a symbol for ‘mixtblood.’ The hourglass shape represents the Tsiiyéeł, a symbol to honor the Navajo matriarch society. A serape layout honors the Yaqui, and turquoise symbolizes the Pueblo of Laguna. These are the Many Nations of Dustin Lopez, a College Fund scholar, designer, and artist. Lopez reclaimed his identity through powwow, where he learned inter-tribal dances and embraced his mixtblood identity with a full heart and open mind.

Order the blanket here: Many Nations

The Designer

Photo of Dustin Lopez courtesy http://voyagephoenix.com/

Dustin Lopez (Diné/Laguna Pueblo/Pascua Yaqui) is based in Phoenix, Arizona. He is currently working as a designer, muralist, and educator, and attends Diné College, majoring in Fine Arts with an emphasis in Design.

Lopez explained that the design of Many Nations is meant to represent the identity crisis felt by Indigenous people who are descendants of more than one tribe or have some non-Native ancestry. Indigenized DNA strands pay tribute to water as the element we cannot exist without. The hourglass shape is made up of the initial M and B for “mixed-blood,” but the hourglass also symbolizes the Tsiiyéeł, or matriarchal society, for many Navajo artists. Star shapes represent parents, both biological and figurative, that pass along traditional teachings and help those struggling with their identity to navigate the world on and off the reservation.

Lopez used a serape design to honor the Yaqui and Laguna Pueblo side of his family and shades of red that reminded him of his home in Coyote Kills Canyon. Finally, the triangles represent the artist radiating with pride, a feeling he hopes to instill in other Indigenous people with all his works, no matter the mixture of their DNA.

With a passion for creativity, Lopez aspires to be a role model on and off the reservation. “My dream is to use art and design as a driving force to reclaim our language, culture, and identities as ‘mixtbloods’. By combining modern and street art with contemporary art, I hope to inspire successfully between both worlds.”

Here, he talks about his inpsirations for Many Nations.

Tribal College Blanket Design Contest and The College Fund

Many Nations is the third winner of the Tribal College Blanket Design contest, which seeks to elevate the voices, work, and representation of tribal college and university (TCU) students while providing TCU students with additional scholarship opportunities. Pendleton has been supporting the work of the College Fund through the sale of special blankets since 1995, and has provided over $1.7 million in scholarship support for American Indian and Alaska Native students attending Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs). Over the years, blankets have been designed by various designers and guest artists, including Larry Ahvakana, Preston Singletary, Mary Beth Jiron, Tracie Jackson, and many more.

The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest nonprofit supporting Native higher education for 33 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $14.45 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2021-22. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $284 million in scholarships, program, community, and tribal college support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

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Medicine Bow – a New Blanket and More

River Inspiration

This beautiful new blanket was inspired by the Medicine Bow River in Wyoming.

Pendleton blanket: Medicine Bow

Medicine Bow

The Medicine Bow River rises deep in Wyoming’s Snowy Range to flow 167 miles on its way to the Medicine Bow Mountains. Native tribes traveled to the area to harvest mountain mahogany for especially fine bows. Stands of wood alternate with bands of arrows, meeting in the center to show the Medicine Bow River crossing, an important link between East and West.

Take a look at the beautiful Medicine Bow River!

The Medicine Bow River, photo by Colby Thomas
Photo by Colby Thomas on Unsplash

The river is a beauty, but it isn’t the only Medicine Bow in Wyoming. Far from it.

Medicine Bow Peak

The highest point of Snowy Range –and the highest point in southern Wyoming–is Medicine Bow Peak (12,018 ft). Intrepid (and hopefully experienced) hikers reach the mountain’s peak on a four-mile trail that features numerous switchbacks and plenty of loose rock. It’s part of the Medicine Bow Mountains, near Laramie, Wyoming.

Medicine Bow National Forest

The river, the peak, and the mountains are part of an enormous preserve called The Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland (also known as the MBRTB). The MBRTB is composed of nearly 2.9 million acres in northern Colorado and eastern Wyoming. The entire complex of mountains ranges, grasslands, and vast unspoiled landscapes spans two states and over a dozen counties.

Medicine Bow, the Town

There’s also a tiny town in Carbon County, Wyoming that bears the Medicine Bow name. With a population of only 200 to 300 people, Medicine Bow has maintained a post office since 1869. It is home to the famed Virginian Hotel. In the past, the town hosted outlaws like Butch Cassidy and his Wild Bunch, who committed the Wilcox Train Robbery just a few miles away from Medicine Bow.

Medicine Bow is a beautiful place and a beautiful pattern that is showcased in this wool jacket.

A man wearing a Pendleton jacket

More information at pendleton-usa.com:

Blanket

Jacket

Last Chance Blankets for January, 2023

Now is the time!

Our USA mills in Oregon and Washington run three shifts a day to keep up with the demand for our wool blankets. Each year, we have to retire blankets to make room on the loom for our newest designs. Stock is low on the following blankets, so if you have been considering one, now is the time!

Child-sized Blankets

Pendleton Moon Dance child-size blanket

Moon Dance

The Menominee tribe of the Great Lakes region tells a tale of Brother Sun and Sister Moon. Brother Sun set out on a long hunt and did not return, causing Sister Moon to worry. She searched far and wide for her brother, waxing and waning for twenty days until she, too, disappeared. But Sister Moon always returns after four nights of darkness to light the night with her soft beams. Sister Moon’s search for Brother Sun is portrayed in this pattern of a cloud-obscured moon dancing gently over water.

This peaceful child-sized blanket was introduced in Fall 2020. It is 32″ x 44″, and napped for cozy story times. It also looks beautiful draped over the back of a chair. See it here: Moon Dance

Star Guardian

Pendleton Star Guardian child-sized blanket.

Crossed arrows stand for brotherhood and the setting aside of conflicts. A peaceful evening has come to the prairie. It is time to light the fires and draw together in the warmth of the fire circle. As logs crackle and flames flicker, stories rise on the night air. Stories of bravery and victory in battle. Stories of stealth and bounty in the hunt. Stories of tricksters and their clever magic. As they share their legends, the People are safe and warm in their tepees. Above it all shines Bear, the great guardian of the night skies.

This charming child-sized blanket was introduced in Fall of 2017. It is 32″ x 44″, and softly napped for soft snuggles, cuddles, and naps. It also makes a fine wall-hanging. See it here: Star Guardian

Robe-sized Blankets

Alamosa

The Alamosa blanket by Pendleton - red, beige, blue

“Of a time long ago, these things are said.” The Navajo language is spoken like a poem, and tells of the first beings, the Air-Spirit People, who emerged in the First World. There, a red island held the Insect People; ants, dragonflies, beetles, and a dwelling called House of Red Rock. To the east, a stepped pattern shows the Place Where the Waters Crossed, home to the sunrise. In the center, blue streams converge, then flow toward each of the sacred Four Directions. 

This spectacular robe-sized blanket (twin) was introduced in Fall of 2020. It is unnapped, so the smooth beauty of the pattern shines through, and is finished with a whipstitch binding. See it here: Alamosa

Crescent Bay

Pendleton Crescent Bay blanket

Crescent Bay, near Laguna Beach in southern California, is part of the California’s 810 miles of ocean coastline. Waves of diamonds represent the waters of the bay, where divers can see an array of sea life; kelp gardens, fish, seals, sea lions–even sharks. Above the bay floats the marine layer, an inversion created when the cool ocean meets warm air. Sometimes clear, sometimes foggy, the marine layer lingers along the coast, gently dispelling inland heat with the cooling power of the Pacific Ocean.

This California-themed robe-sized blanket was introduced in the Spring of 2020. It is unnapped, so the pattern definition is excellent, and it’s finished with a wool binding. See it here: Crescent Bay

Bedding Collection (multiple sizes)

Alta Lakes

Pendleton Alta lakes blanket, shown in Queen size

In the high, clear air of the San Juan Mountains, three alpine lakes nestle against Palmyra Peak. This is Southwestern Colorado’s Alta Lakes recreation area, home to hiking, fishing, boating and paddle boarding. Nearby is a tiny ghost town named Alta, a mining center in the 1800s and early 1900s. The evening sky is lit by glowing bands of sunset colors that touch the peaks of the San Juan Mountains, surrounding the three glowing Alta Lakes.

This vibrant blanket design was introduced as a bedding collection in Fall of 2021. The photo above shows the Queen size. It is unnapped for vibrant pattern definition, and is finished with a whipstitch binding. See the collection here: Alta Lakes

Blankets that Give Back to Nature

Blankets with a cause

At Pendleton, we believe in giving back. We have created beautiful blankets that benefit many philanthropic partnerships, and today’s post is focused on blankets that give back to causes near and dear to Nature.

Oregon Blankets

Pacific Wonderland

Pendleton "Pacific Wonderland" blanket

From the pristine shores of Wallowa Lake to the ocean overlooks of Ecola Point, Oregon’s state park system includes 256 places to hike, picnic, camp, and recharge. It all began one hundred years ago with five acres of donated land that set aside a special place for everyone. In shades of moody indigo, a moonlit landscape celebrates the centennial of the Oregon state parks and our commitment to preserve our Pacific Wonderland for the next 100 years.

The Pacific Wonderland blanket helps support the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s “Park Explorer Series”, which aims to remove barriers to outdoor recreation. Projects include building trails that everybody can use, showcasing parks digitally, and making camping possible for folks who may otherwise never get to try it.

See it here: Pacific Wonderland

Forever Oregon

Pendleton "Forever Oregon" blanket

This limited-edition wool blanket honors our home state’s park system. In this design, Mt. Hood watches over a reflective lake flanked by forests, with geometric patterns honoring Oregon’s original inhabitants. Medallions for 12 beloved state parks are bordered by stripes in colors that echo their landscapes.

Purchase of this blanket also helps support the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s “Park Explorer Series.” If you’d like to know more about the twelve parks selected for this blanket, you can read a little about wach of them here: Forever Oregon

See the blanket here: Forever Oregon

More Nature Blankets that Give Back

Wildland Heroes

The Pendleton Wildland Heroes blanket shows bands of geometric designs that also include evergreen trees, with a dark forest green background, light blue trangles to symbolize water, and yellow and orange accents that represent the threat of wildfires.

The scent of smoke fills the air. An orange glow lights the horizon. Mother Nature is on alert, and Wildland Firefighters stand ready to defend her. These brave men and women hold the line against fire’s destruction with team effort; digging lines, running hoses, saving structures when they can. In Pendleton’s tribute to Wildland Firefighting, bands of deep forest alternate with lines of flame, lighting trees endangered by flame. A portion of this blanket’s sales help the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, which supports families and injured firefighters in times of need.

Supporting Wildfire-relted Casues

This blanket supports the Wildland Firefighter Foundation. We have also used it to support other causes in times of great need. You can read about one of those here: Thank You for Helping the Red Cross. We also held a special sale of this blanket to generate a substantial donation to relief for the Australian Bushfires of 2019-2020.

See it here: Wildland Heroes

National Park Blankets

Pendleton National Park blankets over a fence in front of a mountain

Every Pendleton National Park blanket (as well as throws, apparel, accessories and bags, footwear, mugs, everything!) generates a donation to the National Park Foundation. Funds from our donations have been used to restore the Helical Stairs at Many Glaciers Lodge in Glacier National Park (read about it here: Your Gift to the National Parks: Helical Stairs Project). We are also helping to fund the restoration of the Depot at Grand Canyon National Park, which is still ongoing (read about that here: The Depot Project is Underway!). And, a new project is coming! Watch for an exciting announcement soon.

You can see our current selection of Park blankets (some blankets in the above photo are retired) and Parks-related merchandise at http://www.pendleton-usa.com. And thank you for supporting these important causes.

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Wrangler® and Pendleton Woolen Mills Weave the Spirit of the West Into New Heritage-Inspired Collaboration

A New Collaboration

A man and woman sit together on a dock.

One of America’s most recognized denim labels, Wrangler®, and the world-class leader in wool, Pendleton Woolen Mills, have worked together to create the Wrangler x Pendleton Collection, a collection featuring long-lasting denim, wool and cotton pieces.

A man stands at a lakeshore wearing a hat and a Pendleton-Wrangler jacket.

Coupling the fine wool of Pendleton Woolen Mills with Wrangler’s legendary jeanswear, the collaboration highlights the natural beauty of the American Southwest through colorful patterns inspired by the iconography of the western landscape and the adventurous optimism of the cowboy spirit. 

A woman walks along the shore wearing a Pendleton-Wrangler jacket.

Wrangler x Pendleton offers both men’s and women’s styles, including jeans, sherpa jackets, hoodies, and graphic tees.

The Blanket

As a nod to the western legacy of both legendary brands, the assortment features a signature luxury wool blanket woven with a roping cowboy motif.

Pendleton Wrangler wool blankt, showing a man with a lariat in silhouette

Down to the smallest detail, this wool blanket honors the rich Western roots shared between two American icons: Wrangler® and Pendleton. Made in the USA from wool that’s spun, dyed and woven in the Pacific Northwest, it features a lassoing cowboy framed by a Southwestern-inspired design and a balanced pattern of arrows pointing in two directions. Reverses for two different looks.

A woman reclines on a dock.

Wrangler x Pendleton signifies one of the final collaborations in Wranglers 75th anniversary. The finale of the icon’s diamond anniversary will take place at the season-ending championship event, the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, this December. Pendleton is extremely proud to have been part of the celebration for this iconic brand’s milestone!

A man wearing a wool jacket.

Where to find us:

The Wrangler Pendleton collaboration goods can be found in select retail stores, and online at

Wrangler: Shop the Collaboration

And Pendleton: Shop the Collaboration