Sierra Ridge: Taking Summer into Fall

A woman stands on the beach, looking out to sea.

The last days of Summer

Summer 2020 is almost over, and we are looking ahead to the offical arrival of Fall. One of our new patterns for Fall is Sierra Ridge. It’s shown to wonderful advantage in our Craftsman Collection blanket. These are special blankets, and Sierra Ridge is a standout.

Sierra Ridge Pendleton blanket for The Craftsman Collection

Sierra Ridge Legend

The Sierra Nevadas are the traditional grounds of many Native peoples. The Sierra Miwok, Mono, Kawaiisu, Northern Paiute and Tubatulabal tribes have lived and hunted here. The Paiutes called its tallest granite peak Tumanguya, or, “the Very Old Man.”  Also called Mt. Whitney, it is the highest point in the contiguous United States. The mountains of the 400-mile range are represented by stepped peaks, with arrows guarding the streams and rivers of the Great Basin watershed.

You can learn more about the blanket here: Craftsman Collection by Pendleton

The Sierra Ridge pattern is available in a range of beautiful bags and accessories.

A woman holds a Sierra Ridge bag.

See them here: Sierra Ridge bags and accessories

A woman places her sunglasses into her Sierra Ridge bag.

Jackets, yes, JACKETS

The blanket is beautiful, and the bags and scarves are, too. Our favorites are the denim jackets for men and women trimmed with panels of pure Pendleton wool in the Sierra Ridge pattern. These are perfect transitional pieces to take you from late Summer days to early Fall weather.

A woman stands on a rocky beach, looking to to sea.

See the entire collection here: Sierra Ridge by Pendleton

Our thanks to Joe Goger for these gorgeous photos on the California Coast. You can see more of his work here: Joe Goger Instagram

The Craftsman Collection – From Our Hands to Yours

Three blankets hang over a branch.

A new collection

In 1909, three Bishop brothers opened a mill in Pendleton, Oregon, to weave trade blankets in dazzling colors and patterns. Over one hundred years later, we are excited to bring you The Craftsman Collection celebrating the history, artistry, and craftsmanship of our blankets.

For the introduction, we chose three patterns with stories to tell; Canyonlands, Journey West, and Sierra Ridge. These patterns have been recolored and specially dyed to evoke vintage blankets. One side of each blanket is napped for softness and warmth. The reverse is unnapped, to smoothly showcase the geometry of our exclusive Pendleton patterns. Hand-cut rounded corners recall the shape of blankets from the earliest days of the mill.

On the loom: Canyonlands

Canyonlands celebrates the amazing natural wonders of Utah’s Canyonlands National Park.

Canyonlands Craftsman Collection blanket by Pendleton

To quote the National Park Service, “Canyonlands invites you to explore a wilderness of countless canyons and fantastically formed buttes carved by the Colorado River and its tributaries. Rivers divide the park into four districts: Island in the Sky, The Needles, The Maze, and the rivers themselves. These areas share a primitive desert atmosphere, but each offers different opportunities for sightseeing and adventure.”

See it here: Canyonlands, Craftsman Collection

Journey West

This dynamic blanket celebrates the pioneering spirit of our founder, weaver Thomas Kay, who journeyed to America from England, arriving in Oregon in 1863. Its design was inspired by a blanket discovered in a 19th-century European mill that included the designer’s notes and calculations handwritten neatly along the sides.

Journey West Craftsman Collection blanket by Pendleton

The pattern highlights the universal appeal of geometric shapes and lines. The hooked patterns inside the large diamonds are common symbols of luck and prosperity. Its quality and beauty is a tribute to the generations of weavers that have continued Thomas Kay’s legacy of quality and excellence.

See it here: Journey West for the Craftsman Collection

Sierra Ridge

Sierra Ridge is the third offering in the Craftsman Collection. The Sierra Nevadas are the traditional grounds of many Native peoples. The Sierra Miwok, Mono, Kawaiisu, Northern Paiute and Tubatulabal tribes have lived and hunted here over the ages. The Paiutes called the range’s highest granite peak Tumanguya, or, “the Very Old Man.” Also called Mt. Whitney, it is the highest point in the contiguous United States. The mountains of the 100-mile range are represented by stepped peaks, with arrows guarding the streams and rivers of the Great Basin watershed.

Sierra Ridge Craftsman Collection blanket by Pendleton

See Sierra Ridge here: Sierra Ridge for the Craftsman Collection

Packed with care by hand

Each blanket in the Craftsman Collection is labeled and hand-packed in a special box with a presentation card.

Special commemorative box for the Craftsman Blanket COllection by Pendleton

If you’d like to learn more, you can see the blankets here: Pendleton’s Craftsman Collection Blankets

A Horse Called Paint by Judd Thompson

A Horse Called Paint

The Horse Called Paint blanket comes off the loom.

As beautiful as this blanket looks coming off the loom, you’ll love it even more in finished form.

Judd Thompson

Born in 1983, Thompson grew up on the Crow Indian Reservation, surrounded by art in his family’s business, The Custer Battlefield Trading Post. After graduating from the University of Wyoming with a degree in Art & Art History, he moved to Billings, Montana, where he uses his passion for color theory in a variety of media, including painting and sculpture.

The Blanket

A Horse Called Paint, a blanket for Pendleton Woolen Mills designed by artist Judd Thompson.

A dark horse gallops, silhouetted against a snowy night in “A Horse Named Paint,” by Montana artist Judd Thompson. The reverse is beautiful in a dramatic photo-negative way, too (does anyone remember photo negatives? we have to wonder…).

The reverse side of A Horse Called Paint.

Made in the USA

Photo technology has changed, but Pendleton blankets are timeless. This blanket, like all of our traditional wool blankets and throws, is woven, finished, and packed by hand in the USA in our Pacific Northwest mills. See it here: A Horse Called Paint

Made in USA label with eagle for Pendleton

Making Room on the Loom: Retiring blankets for 2020

Retiring blankets for 2020

Pendleton has been telling stories with our blankets since the first blanket mill opened in 1909. Each year, certain Pendleton blanket designs are retired. These designs are all available at pendleton-usa.com in limited quantities. Is one of these stories yours?

PAINTED HILLS

Pendleton Painted Hills blanket

Rising from the dry plains of Eastern Oregon, bare earth undulates in folds of scarlet, ochre, and yellow. These are the Painted Hills, whose brilliant stripes inspired this design and were created by oxidized mineral deposits in layers of volcanic ash. Adventurers who want to take a road trip into the past can see the hills, visit the nearby John Day Fossil beds and explore the ghost towns of this remote part of Oregon’s landscape.

Learn more here: Painted Hills Blanket

BIGHORN

Pendleton Bighorn blanket

Straddling the borders between Wyoming and Montana, Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area is home to spectacular canyons, clear blue waterways and countless wildlife. In 1825, the Bighorn River called famed mountain man Jim Bridger to build a raft of driftwood and ride it through the foaming rapids. Part of the river was dammed to create Bighorn Lake, but the spectacular canyon it carved remains, named for the Bighorn sheep that travel its rocky, treacherous paths. Located in Montana and Wyoming, about one third of the park unit is located on the Crow Indian Reservation. One quarter of the Pryor Mountains Wild Horse Range lies within the Bighorn Canyon Recreation Area.

Learn more here: Bighorn blanket

TURQUOISE RIDGE

Pendleton Turquoise Ridge blanket

Turquoise is known as the “fallen sky stone.” Prized for its beauty in colors that range from white to aqua to deepest green, turquoise has been used for amulets, beads, jewelry, carvings and more for ten thousand years. Legends of the Navajo, Hopi, Pueblo and Apache nations mention turquoise. In one legend, a tremendous drought brought great suffering to the People of the Earth. When the skies finally opened and shed rain on the People, they rose up to sing, dance and shed tears of joy. Their grateful tears mixed with the rain and seeped into Mother Earth to become Sky Stone.

Learn more here: Turquoise Ridge blanket

BUTTERFLY

Pendleton Butterfly blanket - front view

Sitting Bull challenged us all “to put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children.” Sitting Bull College and the American Indian College Fund memorialize his efforts and echo his belief that education can transform the future. We honor Sitting Bull’s legacy with flower and butterfly designs similar to those on his regalia.  A caterpillar’s transition to butterfly mirrors the transformative power of education—a fitting remembrance for such a visionary leader.  Created exclusively for the American Indian College Fund, a nonprofit organization that helps fund scholarships for Native American students and tribal colleges. Your purchase helps support their honorable mission.

Learn more here: Butterfly blanket

Pendleton Butterfly blanket-reverse view

 

Pendleton label with bald eagle: "Pendleton since 1863 Highest Quality Made in the USA."

Pendleton’s Newest Legendary Blanket – Rodeo Sisters

Pendleton Legendary Series blanket, Rodeo Sisters, held up by two people standing behind it.

Pendleton’s Legendary Series

Each year, we add a new design to this series honoring Native American traditions, legends, and culture. These collectible blankets are symbols of the mutual respect between Pendleton and our first customers. For 2019, we are proud to introduce a blanket designed by Native American Artist Apolonia Susana Santos (1954-2006).

Rodeo Sisters

Front view of "Rodeo Sisters" blanket

Four women draped in blankets stand in a line at sunset in a design by the late artist and activist, Apolonia Susana Santos. Their blankets shine with abalone, quills, small bells and dentalium shells, lifting to reveal moccasins and tooled Western boots. Each hat is uniquely adorned with a band and feathers. This combination of traditional and contemporary delighted the artist, who finished this work and exclaimed, “My sisters are as well-dressed as anyone who shops on Rodeo Drive.”

See more information about the USA-made blanket here (new tab): RODEO SISTERS BLANKET

 

The Artist

Ms. Santos standing in front of a canvas.

Image courtesy of Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie for the First People’s Fund. Learn more about First People’s Fund at (new tab):   https://www.firstpeoplesfund.org/

Ms. Santos (Tygh/Yakima) was a Painter, Serigrapher, Sculptor, Writer and Activist. Her use of rich colors, textures and natural materials created vibrant and dynamic works of art. Her goal was to illuminate historic and contemporary Indigenous life, to bring it forward as a living force.

Susana’s art and her activism were inextricably linked.  She worked tirelessly to preserve Sovereign Traditional fishing rights. As a speaker, she encouraged Native youth to “Remember Who You Are” through writings, public speaking, marches and shows.

Here is the original work on which the blanket is based. Ms. Santos worked with more colors than our looms allow in a blanket, but we love how the design translated. As a note—the artist intended for the word to be pronounced “Ro-DAY-oh,” like the famous shopping district in Beverley Hills.

The original artwork, "Rodeo Sisters," by Susana Santos. All Rights Reserved.

Rodeo Sisters by Susana Santos. All rights reserved.

The Mug

A blanket-wrapped woman's hands holding the Rodeo Sisters mug.

This work’s bright colors and charming graphics worked perfectly on our oversized Pendleton mug. It’s irresistible. And since it’s that time of year, it also makes a perfect gift for the sisters in your life, whether born or chosen.

See more information about the mug here (new tab): RODEO SISTERS MUG

For more Information on the Artist

Ms. Santos’ legacy is a strong one, and friends and loved ones keep it alive with a website. Visit it here for a more complete look at her life, work, and activism. (new tab): Susana Santos

 

Why We Do This – Running the Grand Canyon with Greg Hatten

 

 

Greg Hatten, river guide extraordinaire, in his wooden boat. Greg is also wearing a Pendleton shirt.

Hello from Greg Hatten

In honor of the Grand Canyon‘s 100th anniversary, we are rerunning some guest posts from our friend and favorite guest blogger, Greg Hatten. He has experienced the Canyon as few others have; from within his wooden drift boat, a replica of one of the boats that took to the Colorado River in 1964 to save the Grand Canyon from being turned into a reservoir. Enjoy.

March of 2014 was a deadly month in the Grand Canyon for river runners.   The water level was well below average and even the most experienced boatmen saw water dynamics they had never seen before.  Low water created new hazards – holes were deeper, drops were sharper, jagged rocks that rarely see sunlight punched holes in our boats and holes in our confidence.

An accomplished group of nine kayakers just a few miles ahead of us lost one of their team mates to the river below Lava Falls.  There was a another serious accident in the group two days behind us midway through the trip.

Some of our wood boats were damaged, a few of our rubber rafts flipped, oars and ribs and teeth were broken, a helicopter rescue was required for a member of our team on Day 4. After 280 miles and 24 days on the water, we reached the end of the Grand Canyon and all agreed we were ready to do it again…as soon as possible.

A rough and ready group of "River Rats," five men wearing Pendleton shirts, holding broken oars from their river running adventures.

 

Who are we and why do we do this???   

Greg Hatten maneuvers his way though churning rapids in his wooden boat, the "Portola."

We are a band of wood boat enthusiasts who came to the Grand Canyon in March to re-run a famous trip from 1964 with our wood dory replicas, our canvas tents and bedrolls, our Pendleton wool blankets, and a couple of great photographers to capture the adventure.

Relaxing at the river's edge: Greg Hatten and eight more river runners relax after a day on the river.

Fifty years ago, that trip played a crucial role in saving the Grand Canyon from two proposed dams that were already under construction.  If THAT trip had not happened, THIS trip would not have been possible and our campsites would be at the bottom of a reservoir instead of beside the river.  River running on the Colorado through the Grand Canyon would’ve been replaced by “Reservoir Running in Pontoons,” as most of the Grand Canyon would’ve been hundreds of feet under water.

Three beautiful wooden drift boats want in the shallows next to the Colorado RIver, in the shadow of the walls of the Grand Canyon.

We are celebrating the success of the trip of  ‘64 and paying tribute to those men who left a legacy for future river runners like us to run the big water of the Colorado through the Grand Canyon in river boats.  We are brought together by Dave Mortenson, whose dad was one of those pioneers.

The “Why”…

“Who we are” is easier to answer than “Why we do this.” There are moments on trips like these, when we are at the crossroads of chaos – where adventure and wonder intersect with danger and consequence – and the outcome is uncertain. THAT’s what makes it an adventure.  I can only speak for myself – but here’s my shot at answering “why…”

I do this because the Grand Canyon takes my breath away.  The first time I saw it from the bottom looking up, I fell in love with this place and was absolutely amazed by the size and beauty of the canyon.  Everything is bigger, deeper, taller, more colorful, more powerful, more everything than anyplace I have ever been.

Greg Hatten in the Portola, on still green waters of the Colorado River.

I do this because the Colorado River tests my physical ability as a boatman like no other river I have ever boated.  This is one of the most powerful rivers in North America and when that strong current bends the oars I’m rowing and I feel the raw force shooting up my aching arms and across my tired back, I’m electrified and anxious at the same time.

I do this because the rapids on this river test my mental ability as a boatman.  My friend and veteran Canyoneer Craig Wolfson calls it “Nerve.”  Scouting severe rapids and seeing the safest “line” to run is one thing – having the nerve to put your boat on that line is another.  Most of the difficult rapids require a run that puts your boat inches from disaster at the entry point in order to avoid calamity at the bottom.  Everything in your “experience” tells you to avoid the danger at the top – but you mustn’t.  Overriding those instincts and pulling off a successful run is a mental tug of war that is challenging beyond belief.

I do this because of the bonds we form as a team of 16 individuals working and cooking and rowing and eating and drinking and laughing together for 280 miles.  We problem-solve together, we celebrate together, we look out for each other, and we find a way to get along when every once-in-awhile the stress of the trip makes “some” of us a little “cranky.”   Sometimes, we experience the most vulnerable moments of our lives together.  These people are lifetime friends as a result of this adventure.

And finally – I do this because it brings out the best in me.  My senses are better, my mind is clearer, my body is stronger and I like to think I’m friendlier, funnier, more generous, and more helpful down in the Canyon.  It makes me want to be this open with people up on Rim when I get back to my regular routine.  It’s hard to articulate but for me, the place is magic.

Greg Hatten

Greg Hatten and five friends relax on and around two wooden boats on the banks of the Colorado River.

The Pendleton Grand Canyon blanket

See the Grand Canyon Pendleton blanket and throw here: PARK BLANKETS

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New Child-size/Crib-size Pendleton blankets for 2019

Perfect for Cribs and Cuddles

Enjoy a look at Pendleton’s newest child-sized blankets! These soft wool blankets are made in the USA, and are perfect for crib or cuddle. They also make wonderful wall hanging (click the name of each blanket to see more information at pwndleton-usa.com ).

Shared Paths

This beautiful blanket celebrates the path walked in life, from the helpless dependence of a newborn to the self-sufficiency that comes with growing up.

SharedpathsF&B

Shared Paths legend:

The Navajo word for animals, Naaldlooshii, translates as “the-ones-who-trot-people.” The Navajo study an animal’s behavior to understand and learn from it, knowing that appearances say less than actions. Buffalo is mighty and fearsome, but lives gently by grazing on plants. Fox is supple and small, but lives fiercely by hunting. From Deer to Dove, all Earth’s animals move together on Earth’s shared paths in hózhó, the Navajo state of balance and order.

 

Butterfly

This blanket originated as a robe-sized blanket in the American Indian College Fund collection. In the larger version, the pecan-brown side is the face of the blanket. For the child-sized version, we used the more colorful ombred side as the face of the blanket. Sales of both versions support the work of The College Fund, which provides scholarships to tribal colleges for deserving Native American scholars.

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Butterfly legend:

Lakota leader Sitting Bull worked tirelessly for Native American rights. Sitting Bull College on Standing Rock Reservation memorializes his efforts, and demonstrates the American Indian College Fund’s belief that education can transform the future. Sitting Bull’s legacy is honored with flower and butterfly designs similar to those on his regalia. A caterpillar’s transition to butterfly mirrors the transformative impact of education, a fitting remembrance of a man who lived life bravely for his people.

See the full-sized version of this blanket here: Butterfly

 

Morning Cradleboard by Wendy Ponca: Weavers Series

This blanket was designed by Wendy Ponca, a gifted designer and artist who has designed several blankets for Pendleton over the years. It is part of the Weavers Series, which celebrates the artistry of contemporary weavers by incorporating their one-of-a-kind designs into Pendleton blanket designs.

MorningCradleboardF&B

Morning Cradleboard legend:

This child-sized blanket uses a pattern inspired by finger-woven straps used to secure a baby in a traditional Osage cradleboard. Ponca often creates designs that are tactical by intent, offering Nature’s protection. In Osage, the cradleboard is called o-olo-psha, or “follow-trail-of-animals.” The cradleboard was the beginning of the Road of Life as followed by animals to water and food. People take this same path, beginning life as completely dependent, and working step-by-step to self-sufficiency. As the cradleboard protects the baby, this blanket surrounds a child with warmth and safety on the path to growing up.

Big Medicine

Like the Butterfly blanket above, this blanket began its Pendleton history as a robe-sized blanket. The original Big Medicine blanket was a limited-edition custom run, and each blanket contained hair from a rare white buffalo named…Big Medicine. We wove more of the original coloration using only wool, in both the green version and this new re-color with a charcoal ground.

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Big Medicine legend:

The rare white bison occurs only once in every 10 million births. In 1933, a white buffalo was born in the wild on Flathead tribal lands. He was named “Big Medicine” to reflect his sacred power. Many Native American tribes consider the return of the white buffalo as the fulfillment of an ancient prophecy. Tradition spoke of the coming of a herd of white buffalo. The seven bison on this blanket represent the seven directions: North, South, East, West, Above, Below, and Within. Together, they symbolize wholeness for mankind and the earth. Prayer pipes signify mankind’s communication with the Creator. In the center of the blanket, four hands join within the Circle of Life, representing the joining together of the diverse people of the world and a new beginning. 

See the full-sized versions of this blanket here: Big Medicine

See all our child-sized blankets here: For Crib and Child Pendleton Blankets

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Bunky Echo-Hawk’s Pathway blanket for The College Fund in 2019

 

Artist Bunky Echo-Hawk stands in a field, wrapped in the Pathway blanket he designed for Pendleton, for the American Indian College Fund. Photo by Ryan Redcorn.

Photo by Ryan Redcorn

Bunky Echo-Hawk

Bunky Echo-Hawk (Pawnee/Yakama) is an internationally recognized visual and performing artist. His provocative, exuberant work is exhibited in private collections, galleries and museums throughout the world. He has done design work for non-profit organizations and tribal communities, VANS, and more. He has been designing the Nike N7 collection since 2010. He has painted murals in various tribal communities, towns, and public places, and recently installed a mural in American Airlines Arena in Miami, Florida, the home of the Miami Heat.

His design for the Pathway blanket is best described in his own words.

 

Pathway

Echo-Hawk has saturated his modern design with traditional Pawnee symbology. Red, white, yellow, and black signify the four races of humankind, the four stages of life, the semi-cardinal directions, and animals, plants, and stars associated with those directions. Bands of turquoise surround the design as Sky surrounds Earth. Black and red parfleche elements from Pawnee burden straps alternate with four-pointed stars of the Milky Way, or Path of Departed Spirits. A winding path through the blanket’s center traces life’s journey.

Pathway, a Pendleton blanket for the American Indian College Fund, designed by Bunky Echo-Hawk. Bands of red, yellow, , white, turquoise and black are crossed by a scattering of stars that form a pathway.

Learn More

You can see the blanket here: Pathway 

Sales of the College Fund blankets help support the work of the American Indian College Fund by funding scholarships for Native American students. Learn more about The College Fund and its mission here: The College Fund

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Retiring Pendleton Blankets for 2019

The Buffalo Wilderness blanket by Pendleton hangs over a wooden fence beside a pasture full of bright green grass.

Retiring Blankets

Every year, we retire some of our blanket designs to make room for more. This year, we have some beautiful blankets saying good-bye. You’ll find neutral geometric designs that have become so popular, like Beargrass Mountain and Santa Clara. You’ll also find the bold and colorful geometric designs for which we are so well-known, like Arrow Revival and Eagle Gift. Baby blankets, knitted throws, collaborations and so much more—take a look!

Below are some favorites that you won’t want to miss, all woven and manufactured in the USA in Pendleton’s Pacific Northwest mills.

Neutral Geometrics

Compass Point

This contemporary pattern also comes in a throw that features a central Greek cross.

The Compass Point throw by pendleton is a geometric pattern of crosses in beige, cream and brown on a charcoal background.

North, South, East, West; these are the Cardinal Directions, immortal points on the compass. In this contemporary pattern, each arm of the Greek cross reaches toward one of Earth’s Four Corners, pointing the way to wealth, knowledge and relaxation. Sailors traveled North on high waves to fish the icy waters, South to breathe the balmy air of the Tropics, East to load their ships with profitable trade goods and West to encounter new lands, new dangers, new opportunities. The compass points guide every ship’s journey, showing a path to adventure.

Santa Clara

Subtle hues that echo adobe architecture make this blanket versatile.

The Santa Clara blanket by Pendleton is a geometric pattern in shades of creme, taupe and beige, with mall accents of rust and marine blue.

In 1777, Franciscan padres established Santa Clara Mission in California’s fertile Santa Clara valley. It was supported through the labors of the Tamyen, Ohlone and Costanoan peoples. When the mission system ended, Santa Clara Mission continued to serve as a place of worship. The church was destroyed three times, but has always been rebuilt. In 1926, the current structure was constructed with the distinctive architecture and subtle stucco hues echoed in this design.  Today, Mission Santa Clara de Asís serves as the chapel on Santa Clara University campus.

Colorful Geometrics

Southern Highlands

This pattern has been a hit in our Baggu collaboration!

The Southern Highlands blanket by Pendleton is a geometric pattern in pale green, navy blue, rust red and beige.

Southern Highlands celebrates the traditional craft of wool coverlet weaving as practiced by the women of the Appalachian region of the Southeastern United States. Appalachians settled in remote hills and valleys, and survived by hunting, gathering and small-scale agriculture. Their rustic cabins were filled with objects made from materials at hand.  For coverlets, women grew flax and cotton on the same property where sheep were raised for wool. Hand-carded and spun, with dyestuffs derived from walnut shells, indigo and other colored flora, coverlets were hand-loomed in the four-harness overshot method. Traditional colors were blue, red and green, woven on a white or cream warp. Patterns range from circles to intricate geometric eye-dazzlers. The woven coverlet inspired great artistry in Appalachian weavers. Today, their work is admired and preserved in museums and collections across the country.

Hacienda

It’s hard to say farewell to this one; Hacienda is a popular blanket that has been in the line for a decade.

The Hacienda blanket by Pendleton, a geometric pattern in turquoise, brown, gold and white.

Timeless geometric shapes give universal appeal to the nine-element design in this USA-made wool blanket. The stripes, crosses, triangles and diamond motifs in this pattern are interpretations of the symbols common in many early Navajo blankets. Crosses represent completeness and the four directions: North, West, South and East. Arrows signify movement, power and life force. Like traditional Navajo designs, this pattern continues to the edges of the blanket to prevent evil spirits from being trapped within.

Pictorial Blankets

Buffalo Wilderness

The great Plains Bison is the star of this blanket, one of many we’ve woven to celebrate the buffalo.

The Buffalo Wilderness blanket by Pendleton shows a buffalo (or bison) in silhouette against a landscapr of green, brown and gold. At the top of the blanket, two elk are shown in silhouette.

This design honors a time when millions of bison roamed North America’s grassy plains. Today our National Parks protect the last remaining wild herds. One of the largest herds of free-ranging wild buffalo lives in Yellowstone National Park. It’ thought to be the only place in the United States where bison have lived continuously since prehistoric times. You can also see herds in Badlands, Grand Teton, Theodore Roosevelt and Wind Cave National Parks.

Full Moon Lodge

This design plays on the luminous combination of blue and orange. Learn more about the artist behind the blanket here: Starr Hardridge

The Full Moon Lodge blanket by pendleton shows a bright orange and gold teepee against a dark blue sky, wit a full moon shining through tree branches. This blanket was designed by artist Starr Hardridge.

A USA-made wool blanket created in partnership with artist Starr Hardridge. This design illustrates the relationship between humankind, Mother Nature and the creator of the universe whose medicine is love. It acknowledges our place between the sun and the full moon. Part of our Legendary Collection, this design honors stories and symbols of Native American cultures.

So get them while they’re here—they are saying good-bye soon!

Two young women run away from the camera through a field with tall grasses in the sunshine. They are holding a pendleton Compass point blanket between them as they run.

Photo by Kristen Frasca

http://www.kristenfrasca.com/

https://www.instagram.com/kristenfrasca/

 

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New for Spring 2019 – Spirit Seeker

A bed made up with the Pendleton Spirit Seeker blanket.

Happy Spring!

Another beautiful blanket for Spring 2018 has arrived at the website!

Spirit Seeker

The Spirit Seeker blanket is predominantly woven in indigo and cream. Accent colors of lime green, orange and fuchsia are used sparingly in complex bands of arrows and flowers. It’s a beautiful arrangement of line and color!

The front of the Pendleton Spirit Seeker blanket.

The blanket’s reverse lets the accent colors shine.

The back of the Pendleton Spirit Seeker blanket.

Spirit Seeker:

The quest for knowledge leads the spiritual seeker on many paths. In Australia, bush people go on ritual wanderings known as walkabouts. The Babongo people of Africa have a rebirthing ritual that includes a journey to find spiritual truth.  Native Americans from many different tribes go on vision quests, rites of passage that include fasting, prayer, and a solitary journey to find life’s purpose. Spirit Seeker celebrates Spirit Seekers and their journeys with multi-directional arrows bordering a medallion, the central truth reached by multiple paths.

Perfect for Spring, perfectly Pendleton.

Pendleton logo label that shows a drawing of a bald eagle, and the words: "Pendleton since 1863 Highest Quality Made in the USA." This blanket is sewn onto all Pendleton's traditional wool blankets, which are still 00% made in the USA.