Supporting our National Parks: Now More Than Ever!

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Karla Morton, our favorite National Park Poet, sent this amazing shot from her “Words of Preservation: Poets Laureate National Park Tour.” This is the Pendleton Badlands National Park blanket, at home in the Badlands National Park. Karla and her fellow poet laureate, Alan Birkelbach, are 26 parks into their tour, with Hawaii and Samoa coming up soon. You can read more on their blog. We wish them well on their journey!

Along with our favorite poets, we have sent quite a few of our Pendleton National Park series blankets home to their parks with travelers, explorers and photographers. The blanket stripes and colors honor the landscapes, wildlife and ecology of our national treasures. Through licensed National Park Collection products we are proud to support two park restoration projects through a donation to the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks. So far, through Pendleton’s initiatives with park series blankets and collaboration partners, we are closing in on 3/4 of a million dollars for two projects!

Many Glacier Hotel Stairway Project

In the 1950’s, the stunning double-helix staircase circling the lobby in the historic Many Glacier Hotel was torn out to make room for a gift shop. In 2017, with support from the Pendleton contributions, the historic staircase was rebuilt and now stands as a landmark feature in the newly restored lobby.

Grand Canyon Train Depot Project

Constructed in 1910, the Grand Canyon Depot is a National Historic Landmark and one of three remaining stations constructed from logs in the US. Today it remains an active rail depot, seeing thousands of visitors annually from its location near the canyon’s rim inside Grand Canyon National Park. Funds will support restoration and preservation efforts.

Our original plan was to partner with the National Park Foundation for two years, in honor of their 100 year anniversary. We have extended that partnership, as the parks need our support now more than ever. Buying a blanket is only one way to support your favorite park, and you can also make donations directly.  More information on ways to give can be found here: National Park Foundation Support

As Karla said, “…these lands, while under the preservation of the government, still need champions, still need those who are willing to give their time and hearts to make sure they continue to be protected.” Let’s all do our part.

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Five Favorite Pendleton Wedding Gifts

Summer is wedding season, and June is here. Are you looking for the perfect wedding gift? We have some suggestions to send your newlyweds off in style! Here are our top five Pendleton wedding gift suggestions.

5. Towel for Two

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The beach is a perfect place to lie side-by-side on the Pendleton Towel for Two. This big, blanket-sized towel is extra plush and soft—perfect for wrapping up together. Pure cotton terry is sheared on one side for softness, looped on the other for superior absorption. Just roll it up and take it along, thanks to the nylon carrying strap (included).

Shown above: Serrado    Below: Tucson   and    Point Reyes

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WE WALK TOGETHER by Ginew, Dyani White Hawk and Pendleton

Native American-owned apparel company Ginew of Portland, Oregon, has released their WE WALK TOGETHER wool blanket.

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The blanket represents a fusion of tribal cultures (Ojibwe, Oneida, and Mohican), and is the result of an exploration of design with artist DYANI WHITE HAWK. Each blanket is proudly woven in Oregon by Pendleton® Woolen Mills.

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GINEW, The Company

GINEW Gih-noo) is the only Native American owned premium denim collection. Focusing on American-made materials, they incorporate elements of their Native American heritage (Ojibwe, Oneida, & Mohican) to express a contemporary Native voice through premium apparel and accessories. Ginew is Native-Americana, fusing Native American style and workwear.

According to Ginew,

It is customary in our communities to wrap a newly joined couple in a blanket to symbolize their union. The blanket colors represent the sacred day (sunrise & sunset) and wampum belt (purples), teachings which impart values to guide us in our life together. The lodges are in the shape of traditional Ojibwe and Oneida dwellings. The crest fuses timeless symbols from each of our tribes, the dwelling (Ojibwe) and Skydome (Oneida). Together, the colors and symbols represent how we value our traditional beliefs in our home as we walk this journey of life together.

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The Artist, Dyani White Hawk

Dyani White Hawk is a mixed-media artist and curator working in Minneapolis, MN. White Hawk draws from her multi-cultural background and education to create abstract paintings and mixed media works that speak to her upbringing as a Lakota woman in an urban American landscape.

She talks about her background and design process:

I am a painter and mixed-media artist. I work predominantly in abstraction. My work combines influences, mediums and histories of modern abstract painting and Lakota abstract art forms. You can find more information on my website: www.dyaniwhitehawk.com

Erik, Amanda, and myself all met when we were at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It was a brief, single dinner meeting, but the connection lasted. I was excited to hear from Erik on ways we could collaborate. He threw out a few different possibilities before this one came together. In a very collaborative process, we worked to achieve a design that spoke to each of their tribal backgrounds, their individuality, their partnership, and their vision for high quality, finely crafted, culturally rooted products.

I am grateful for the partnership and the opportunity provided through our work together. Moreover, I am most excited to be able to be a part of and support the dreams and visions for another Native entrepreneurial team.

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The WE WALK TOGETHER blanket is woven of pure virgin wool and cotton. Each wool blanket is 64” x 80”, unnapped, felt bound, and adorned with a custom suede patch. Available on ginewusa.com.

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A Colorful Smoky Mountain Elopement

Today’s post is a repost from thebridelink.com  (with permission, of course). Enjoy it here, and if you’d like to see more photos, head over there! 

Smoky Mountain Elopement

Photography:  Leah Moyers Photography    Officiant : Radiant Gatherings

There is something so intimate, meaningful, and special about an elopement. The act of two people intentionally choosing to say ‘I do’ JUST to each other (and sometimes just parents or immediate family) has a certain charm that we adore. We were smitten when looking through talented Leah Moyers‘ photographs of their creekside ceremony in the Smoky Mountains National Park. We are all about infusing meaning into as many wedding day details as possible and Sandie and Greg did this to perfection – below you’ll read how this sweet couple met and why boats and water are paramount in their relationship (swoon…). After a personalized ceremony reading by officiant Radiant Gatherings, the newlyweds headed to Tennessee staple property Blackberry Farm for dinner and continued celebrations. Cheers to the new Mr. and Mrs!

Leah Moyers said:

“Smoky Mountain and Blackberry Farm Elopement: Sandie & Greg’s intimate elopement was so special, what incredible locations! We started the day in their room at Blackberry Farm in Walland, TN. Blackberry Farm is “one of America’s most celebrated intimate luxury hotels… situated on a pastoral 4,200-acre estate in the Great Smoky Mountains… one of the top rated properties in the world.” Sandie chose a beautiful Alice+Olivia dress with intricate embroidered scenes depicting wildlife and nature, very fitting for their wedding day in the mountains. Sandie’s earrings were cast rosemary. During the Victorian era, the herbs a bride carried held serious meaning: rosemary stood for remembrance. She wore a cast feather bracelet, her grandmother’s pin in her hair and clogs from Bryr’s handmade bridal line. We enjoyed wandering around the farm and taking portraits by the stream, the garden and the boat house. Sandie & Greg met on a weekend long kayaking trip and the boat house was a perfect place for them to have portraits made as boats are an important and sentimental part of their life together. Their ceremony took place by the water on mossy rocks in a magnificent part of the Smoky Mountains National Park. Intimate elopements are seriously amazing to photograph and I enjoyed spending the day with Sandie & Greg, capturing them in these beautiful natural areas. After they said I do Greg washed Sandie’s feet in the mountain stream and they celebrated with more portraits, a glass of champagne and wrapped themselves up in a Great Smoky Mountains National Park Pendleton blanket, a beautiful wedding gift. They ended their day with a dinner and weekend celebration at Blackberry Farm and then off to a Caribbean honeymoon. Officiant- Radiant Gatherings, Yacoubian Tailors, Pretty Little Papers, earrings and cuff bracelet by Michael Michaud, The Clay Pot Floral”

Smoky Mountain Elopement


In continuing with the mountain and nature theme, Sandie and Greg’s inviations featured the prettiest foraged foliage.


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Sandie’s boho-fabulous Alice + Olivia gown was so her! We loved the personalization this couple placed on their wedding day.


Smoky Mountain Wedding

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Now this is a first kiss… cue the ‘aaaaw’ …


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Greg washed Sandie’s feet in the mountain stream. We love this meaningful and traditional gesture of utmost respect and love.


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A Blanket for Your Little Star, Born in the Year of the Eclipse

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Pendleton child-size blankets

…can help you celebrate a baby born during the eclipse year, or just wrap your little star watcher in something wonderful. We weave blankets that tell stories, and we want those stories to be told for generations. A Pendleton child’s blanket will warm your children, and their children, and the children who come after—and will definitely be around for the next full solar eclipse in April of 2024!

Star Guardian

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Crossed arrows stand for brotherhood and the setting aside of conflicts. A peaceful evening has come to the prairie. It is time to light the fires and draw together in the warmth of the fire circle. As logs crackle and flames flicker, stories rise on the night air. Stories of bravery and victory in battle. Stories of stealth and bounty in the hunt. Stories of tricksters and their clever magic. As they share their legends, the People are safe and warm in their tepees. Above it all shines Bear, the great guardian of the night skies.

Chief’s Road

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Chippewa-Cree artist Jesse Henderson designed this blanket of the Milky Way, or “Chief’s Road,” exclusively for Pendleton. The Big Dipper and North Star shine brightly. Bear and moose tracks border the sky. Below, rows of lodges represent the children of the Creator and Mother Earth.

 

Sons of the Sky, Daughters of the Earth

These designs were created in partnership with Virginia Stroud, an acclaimed contemporary Native American artist. Every purchase helps support the honorable mission of the American Indian College Fund, a nonprofit organization that helps fund scholarships for Native American students and tribal colleges. Both designs honor a significant Plains indian tradition: Parents place a newborn child’s umbilicus inside a turtle of lizard-shaped amulet that embodies the turtle’s hard shell or the lizard’s quick movement. This guards the child’s spirit to ensure a long, protected life.

Sons of the Sky

ZE786-52008-Sons-Of-The-Sky-MuchachoThe central turtle amulet is surrounded by celebratory stars and rainbows in honor of new birth.

Daughters of the Earth

ZE786-52009-Daughters-of-the-EarthWater lilies and dragonflies surround a lizard amulet on a soothing rainbow that evokes a marsh sunset.

 

Raven Sunburst

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According to a Steilacoom legend, in the beginning, Grey Eagle kept the sun, moon, stars, fresh water and fire hidden from the people. Then Raven fell in love with Grey Eagle’s beautiful daughter. To please her, he turned himself into a snow-white bird, so she invited him into her father’s lodge. When Raven saw the sun and moon, he stole them and escaped through a smoke hole in the house. Outside, he hung the sun in the sky and flew away. At night, he put up the moon for light and kept on flying, carrying with him a stick of fire. Soon the smoke from the fire drifted over his back, turning his white feathers black.

Wild Horses

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Thundering hooves raise clouds of dust as wild mustangs gallop across the valley floor. These graceful creatures epitomize the free spirit of the West, standing as symbols of pride and tradition for many Native Americans. As the sun sets, stars shine against the vivid colors of the evening sky. This design celebrates independence, strength and mobility, all traits of the wild horse.

And so many more

We have so many choices for your young ones. You can see them all here: Child-sized Pendleton blankets   These blankets are 32” x 44”, perfect for a crib or a snuggle. And they are 100% made in the USA.

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Sky Stories: Pendleton Blankets for the 2017 Eclipse 

If a beautiful Pendleton blanket is part of your plan to celebrate and commemorate the upcoming full solar eclipse, we are here with some suggestions! We’ve been weaving blankets that tell stories for over a century, and some of our most beautiful designs celebrate the night skies. All of these wool blankets are made in the USA.

Here are our Sky Stories.

Night Dance

ZE493-53339-Night-Dance-RobeNight falls as dancers gather on the Square Ground for the Stomp Dance, performed by many tribes: Caddo, Seneca, Muskogee, Cherokee, Shawnee, Seminole and more.  Against the dark blue of the night sky, the bright flames of the ceremonial fire rise.  Mother Fire is considered a sacred being who watches over the dancers and receives their songs and prayers. The Chief calls upon his medicine man and speaker to help him lead this sacred gathering. Men take their places in arbors built facing each of the Four Directions. With traditional and treasured turtle-shell rattles fastened to their legs, dancers begin their shuffle and stomp. Strong medicine and the repetitive steps of the Stomp Dance lead them to an inspirited, meditative state. The night echoes with the haunting call and response of their special songs. The Stomp Dance lasts until morning arrives to fill the sky with colors of Dawn.

Full Moon Lodge

ZL494-53137_legendary_full_moon_lodgeThis design was created in partnership with Muscogee Creek artist Starr Hardridge, and is part of our Legendary Collection. This design illustrates the relationship between humankind, Mother Nature and the creator of the universe, whose medicine is love. It acknowledges our place between the sun and the full moon. Full Moon Lodge is part of our Legendary Collection, which honors stories and symbols of Native American cultures.

Pueblo Dwelling

ZD435-53055_heritage_pueblo_dwellingThis is a vintage design from 1923, the heyday of Native American trade blanket production. Dazzling colors and geometric designs tell a story. Arrows symbolize the paths of life and power. Stars centered in squares echo the bright Morning Star, a spirit honored by many pueblo dwellers. This blanket is part of our Heritage Collection.

Star Wheels

ZE493-53049_jacquard_star_wheelsHigh atop the Big Horn Range in Wyoming sits one of the best-known medicine wheels or sacred hoops. This spoked circle of stones was created by Plains Indians between 300 and 800 years ago. Astronomers have noted that during the summer solstice, the spokes of the wheel point to the rising and setting of the sun, and four bright stars, a discovery celebrated by astronomers.

Northern Lights

ZE494-53415-Northern-Lights-FThe Northern Lights are as mysterious as they are glorious. Native legends offer intriguing explanations for these shining bands of transparent color that dance across the night skies. To the Fox tribe of Wisconsin, the lights were an omen of war, spirits of enemies rising up to do battle again. To their neighbors, the Menominee tribe, the lights belonged to torches carried by the manabai’wok, giant spirits of hunters and fishermen that were out spearing fish.  Northern lights are most visible at midnight in the extreme north, and occasionally seen as far south as America’s Gulf Coast.

Gatekeeper

 

ZD485-51109_heritage_gatekeeperThe Gatekeeper is an original Pendleton design from 1935. This USA-made wool blanket is a beautiful example of a Center Point pattern, which contains a primary design element that falls within a band through the center of the blanket. The eight-point star is a common motif in Sioux culture and often represents the morning star, signifying a new beginning with the break of dawn. As gatekeeper of the morning, it shows the way to the light and knowledge of the day.

Stella Maris

ZE493-53247-Robe-Stella-MarisStar of the sea, or Stella Maris, represents the guiding presence of the North Star. As a ‘pole star,’ it shines an abiding light by which sailors have navigated for as long as man has traveled the sea. The graduated palette of indigo, lapis, turquoise and ivory unfolds in a dynamic chevron pattern that evokes the emanation of starlight in the night sky, recalling the traditional craft of Star Quilts. Designer Alyssa Pheobus Mumtaz is an American artist known for her multimedia drawing practice, inspired by iconography of traditional textiles. Her work is exhibited worldwide and recognized by numerous fellowships and grants.

 

Journey West

ZE493-52773_jacquard_journey_westThis dynamic blanket celebrates the pioneering spirit of our founder, weaver Thomas Kay, who journeyed to America from England, arriving in Oregon in 1863. Its design was inspired by a blanket discovered in a 19th-century European mill which included the designer’s notes and calculations handwritten neatly along the sides. The pattern highlights the universal appeal of geometric shapes and lines. The hooked patterns inside the large diamonds are common symbols of luck and prosperity. Its quality and beauty is a tribute to the generations of weavers that have continued Thomas Kay’s legacy of quality and excellence.

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We’re having a gift card giveaway on Instagram over the weekend–starting tomorrow. If you win, which blanket would you choose?