Volunteer Profile: Trevor Nichols, Teacher-in-Residence for Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park

Science, Nature, and Education

Trevor Nichols is a science teacher at Abraham Lincoln High School in southwest Denver. He’s in his fifth year of teaching AP Environmental science, Earth System science, and Earth Science for English Language Acquisition students.

Trevor comes to teaching with a degree in wildlife biology. He wasn’t intending to teach until he was inspired by a lecture given by Dr. Paul Angermeier, a professor at Virginia Tech. Dr. Angermeier’s message was strong: if you want to make a difference in conservation efficacy, go into education and teach young students about the natural world.

Trevor took this message to heart.  He teaches at a high school with a broad student demographic, in a neighborhood where some students rarely venture outside an eight-block radius of the school. The Rockies are right next door, but it’s not uncommon for a student to graduate without ever having made a visit. Trevor hopes that science education can help to repair the ongoing disconnect between youth and the natural world.

Trevor teaches a group of students in Rocky Mountain National Park

Summer Commitment

That’s why, every summer for the last four years, Trevor had finished up his school year in early June, and moved up to Rocky Mountain National Park to take up his post as Teacher-in-Residence. Working with the incredible educational program in place at the park, he designs and implements lessons for student groups that range from kindergarten to community college.

The educational program at the park gets high marks from Trevor. “They’re aligned with quality standards up there that cross into the classroom and support teachers with their work. I can’t say enough about the resources and quality of the experience. Some programs for upper level use actual field methods—giving the kids a real experience of what a natural resource manager may do for the Park Service.” Field experiences provide exposure to correct scientific methods and possible careers.  Most importantly, it connects kids to the wonders of Rocky Mountain National Park.

Students taking field notes in Rocky Mountain National Park

Words from the Heart

Says Lindsey Lewis, Trevor’s volunteer coordinator:

I can’t think of someone with a better rapport with their own students and coworkers than Trevor.  He arrives each summer having given his all to teaching all school year and sees his time at Rocky as a way to continue to contribute but also as a time to relax and recharge.  Of course, his idea of relax and recharge might be a bit different than most folk’s idea.  As he spends his free time during the summer hiking, summiting Rocky’s high peaks, and backpacking on longer weekends.

He spends his time in the office providing feedback on curriculum development and correlating programs to education standards as well as advising new interns and education instructors in techniques and educational theory.  He also assists with training as he knows more Latin than most regular park rangers.  He loves to identify flowers and even grasses by their Latin names.  When he finds one he doesn’t know or can’t remember he’s immediately looking it up and sharing it with others. 

During field programs he is quick to create a rapport with his students of the day.  Being a former hockey player who stands well over 6 feet tall, his presence is not easily missed but his calm and patient demeanor allow him to work with students of all ages.  He has a way of making learning fun and taking the fear out of the unknown for students.  He easily laughs at his own mistakes and is quick to help others handle their own challenges in the same way – with an easygoing and positive attitude.

Trevor, thank you so much for your efforts and outreach on behalf of Rocky Mountain National Park.

Rocky Mountain National Park by Kate Roylston

Photos of Trevor Nichols courtesy Trevor Nichols, used with permissions.

Rocky Mountain photography by Pendleton brand ambassador Kate Rolston. See more of her work HERE.

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Taking a Blanket Home: Grand Canyon National Park and the #pendle10park Explorers

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The Grand Canyon Blanket Goes Home

We sent our Grand Canyon blanket home to Grand Canyon National Park with photographer Kristian Irey, celebrating 100 years of our National Park Service.

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Kristin’s thoughtful shots at the rim of this natural marvel are some of our favorites. And the Grand Canyon is one of the recipients of our fundraising efforts. All year, through sales of our own and collaborative National Park projects, we have been raising money to help restore the Grand Canyon’s train depot.

 

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The Front Door

The Grand Canyon Depot in Grand Canyon Village is the Park’s “front door,” used as a meeting place for adventurers for over 100 years. This National Historic Landmark is the Park’s most-photographed man-made structure.  Pendleton’s contributions will help improve accessibility and preserve the character of this National Historic Landmark.

According to the National Park Service, “Nearly 230,000 visitors per year arrive at the Depot via the Grand Canyon Railway, which is an important component of the park’s transportation system. Currently the Grand Canyon Railway, owned and operated by Xanterra Parks and Resorts, runs up to two trains per day to the park from Williams, Arizona – saving approximately 300 daily vehicle trips during the peak visitor season.” That is approximately 50,000 cars, trucks and campers that will not add wear, tear and crowding to roads leading in and out of the park, thanks to the train.

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Mary Elizabeth Jane Coulter

Before the railroad opened in 1901, tourists had to fork over $15.00 for a three-day stagecoach ride to see the Grand Canyon. Upon arrival, they were accommodated in tent camps, a situation that didn’t change until the Santa Fe Railroad hired architect Mary Elizabeth Jane Coulter to design six iconic buildings for the park, mostly on the South Rim.

  • Hopi House, 1905
  • Hermit’s Rest, 1914
  • Lookout Studio, 1914
  • Phantom Ranch, 1922
  • The Watchtower at Desert View, 1932
  • Bright Angel Lodge, 1935

Her work still stands today, having become an integral part of this vast, commanding landscape. You can learn more here: Mary Elizabeth Jane Coulter

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So put on your boots, hop on the train, and go. The Grand Canyon is waiting.

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Grand Canyon Park Series: SHOP Grand Canyon from Pendleton

See more work by our Grand Canyon #pendle10park explorer: 

Kristian Irey  

Instagram:  @kristianirey

 

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Airstream & Pendleton. Your dreams came true.

The new Pendleton Airstream camper parked in front of mountains

The new Pendleton Airstream…

…is causing a stir, as it brings together two iconic American brands in in the #liveriveted Airstream of your dreams. Enjoy these photos, taken in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, before we could even TALK about this project!

the Pendleton Airstream's special metal plaque, identifying it as a limited edition

The special touches start at the front door…

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a woman wrapped in a Pendleton blanket sits on the entry steps of the Pendleton Airstream

Screen detail calling out the 100th anniversay of the National park Service

…and continue through the interior.

Woman with yellow Labrador dog sits on the banquette

Pendleton motifs that celebrate our National Parks are embossed on the leather seating and stenciled on the storage doors.

A woman sitting at a table in the Pendleton Airstream

A selection of Pendleton Home goods from our National Park Collection furnishes your Airstream in Pendleton style.

A man sits on the banquette of the Pendleton Airstream, surrounded by Pendleton blankts

And don’t forget your best friend.

A man and woman at the steps to the Pendleton Airstream, while a dog looks on

A woman and dog sit at the back hatch of the Pendleton Airstream

A Great Cause

The Pendleton Airstream isn’t just a wonderful way to explore the National Parks. It’s a wonderful way to support the Parks. A portion from the sale of each of the 100 limited edition Pendleton Airstreams will help support the National Park Foundation, which maintains and preserves our National Treasures for future generations.

Window cling of the Pendleton Airstream

So if you’re ready to start living your dream life today, contact Airstream for more information here: PENDLETON AIRSTREAM

The Pendleton Airstream

The rear of the Pendleton Airstream as it drives along a mountain road

Happy Trails!