New for Spring 2019 – Pagosa Springs Blanket

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Our newest blankets are arriving at the website, and you’re going to love them; Pagosa Springs is a beauty.

Pagosa Springs

hot springs

Pagosa Springs is woven in turquoise and earth tones inspired by hot springs all over the world, like the Grand Prismatic Spring here in the USA.

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The reverse has a light ground, for completely different look. That can be one of the beautiful benefits of jacquard loom weaving.

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Pagosa Springs:

Long ago, the Southern Utes of Colorado told of a plague that medicine men could not cure. A council gathered on the riverbank and built a gigantic fire, danced and prayed for help, then fell into a deep sleep. When they woke, the fire was replaced by a pool of fragrant hot water. They bathed and were healed by the springs, naming it “Pah” (water) and “Gosa” (boiling). In the center of this design, blue hot springs rise through a medallion of fire to bring peace and health.

Pagosa Hot Springs is the world’s deepest geothermal hot spring.  Check it out here: Pagosa Hot Springs

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Spring is a beautiful time for Pendleton.

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Pendleton Patriotic Blankets for 2018

As an American company with strong roots in the West, Pendleton Woolen Mills weaves blankets with  meaning and beauty. Every blanket tells a story, and we have woven many blankets that celebrate American patriotism over the years, from the Grateful Nation  blanket that celebrates the contributions of our veterans, to retired blankets like Code Talker,  Chief Eagle and Home of the Brave. Here are some beautiful blankets to help us remember our patriotic spirit this Independence Day. To see more information on the blankets below, click the blanket name, which will take you right to the website.

Bighorn

 

Bighorn

In 1825, the Bighorn River called famed mountain man Jim Bridger to build a raft of driftwood and ride it through the foaming rapids. Part of the river was dammed to create Bighorn Lake, but the spectacular canyon it carved remains, named for the Bighorn sheep that travel its rocky, treacherous paths. Located in Montana and Wyoming, about one third of the park unit is located on the Crow Indian Reservation. One quarter of the Pryor Mountains Wild Horse Range lies within the Bighorn Canyon Recreation Area.

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