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Posts tagged ‘made in the USA’

Celebrating America’s Treasures with the #pendle10park Explorers

Last year, we sent out a call on Instagram, asking for photographers to take our blankets home to their parks. We were overwhelmed with responses! After diligent review of well over a thousand Instagram feeds, we chose ten and called it good.

You’ve seen their work all year, but this video takes you on a tour of all ten parks, with a catchy banjo score that has us tapping our feet here at the office. So Happy Birthday to the National Park Service and thank you to our #pendletonparks explorers. You can see them all (and follow them ALL on Instagram) at the end of the movie.

 

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Pendleton for the National Parks

Pendleton Experiences in Yosemite National Park

Please enjoy some Yosemite memories and photos from Greg, who is one of our northern California account managers.

I have procrastinated on this, because it will be tough to pick a single Yosemite memory. I have been going to the park for 40 years, visiting a couple of times per year. I also go as a vendor. Every time, I see something different, even if it’s just a day trip to the Valley to “work” (if you can call it that).

 

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My first trip was a high school backpacking trip, when we watched a mama bear and her two cubs attempt to steal food that we’d stored up in a small pine tree. One of the cubs was sent up the tree to get the pack, but he wasn’t small enough. The tree snapped! Down came the tree and the cub to the ground. We hiked out the next day, 12 miles in the pouring rain.

Over the years I’ve hiked and climbed some of the park’s largest peaks, fly-fished many of the lakes and streams, backcountry skied into the Ostrander Hut and snow camped throughout the park.

I was there a week after the Valley flood of 1997 when they were still pulling campground picnic tables out of the trees. Signs now mark the high water mark along the Merced River six feet over the road.

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I was there just after the huge rockfall at Glacier Point covered Happy Isles with an eerie, almost lunar, pulverized granite dust and debris.

I was there when Mel Gibson, Jodi Foster and James Garner filmed the teepee village scenes in the El Capitan Meadow for the remake of Maverick.

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After a lifetime of special memories, it’s too hard to choose one.

 

Are you ready for your own Yosemite adventures? We’d love to come along with you.

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Image: Allie Taylor (@alliemtaylor)

And remember, your purchase of our National Park Collection helps support preservation and restoration of America’s Treasures.

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Taking a Blanket Home with a #pendle10park Explorer: Yosemite National Park

Taylor_IMG_9272_BYosemite Valley, carved by glaciers and the Merced River, came to public attention in the 1860s, through the journalistic efforts of a Scottish immigrant named John Muir. He wrote countless articles describing the wonders of Yosemite, raising awareness that helped contribute to the eventual preservation of the area for generations to come.

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Yosemite is not America’s first National Park. The Yosemite wilderness and Mariposa redwood grove were designated as protected wilderness areas in 1864, with legislation signed by President Abraham Lincoln. But Yellowstone National Park was created a full eighteen years before Yosemite.

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The original wilderness did not include Yosemite Valley and its world-famous landmarks—El Capitan, Half Dome and Yosemite Falls. The park as we know it was expanded after Teddy Roosevelt asked John Muir to guide him on a camping expedition to Yosemite in 1903.

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Their night in the Mariposa Grove inspired one of Teddy’s most memorable quotes, in which he compared his night in the grove to “lying in a great solemn cathedral, far vaster and more beautiful than any built by the hands of man.” Muir lobbied the president to expand the park to include lands already in California’s possession, and in 1906, President Roosevelt signed a law that brought the Yosemite Valley under federal jurisdiction.

Here at Pendleton, we’re dismayed to write this, but domesticated sheep were once the primary threat to Yosemite. One threat? Shepherds who set meadow-fires to promote the growth of more edible grasses for their far-ranging flocks. The sheep caused trouble, too, destroying sub-alpine meadows and passing diseases to the native bighorn sheep. This prompted naturalist John Muir to call them “hoofed locusts.”

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The original Yosemite Park Rangers were Buffalo Soldiers. According to the Yosemite National park website:

Buffalo Soldiers, like their white counterparts in U.S. Army regiments, were among the first park rangers, in general, and backcountry rangers, in particular, patrolling parts of the West…Approximately 500 Buffalo Soldiers served in Yosemite National Park and nearby Sequoia National Park with duties from evicting poachers and timber thieves to extinguishing forest fires. Their noteworthy accomplishments were made despite the added burden of racism.

You can read the entire (fascinating) history, listen to a podcast and watch a video of a modern-day re-enactor who works in Yosemite here: Yosemite’s Buffalo Soldiers .

Another item of interest? The Buffalo Soldiers inspired the traditional Park Ranger hat. Many were Spanish-American War veterans who had shielded themselves from tropical rains of Cuba and the Philippines by pinching their high-crowned, broad-brimmed hats into symmetrical quadrants. This distinctive peak was known as the “Montana Peak” on the home front, and eventually became part of the National Park Service ranger uniform.

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Some Yosemite numbers:

Over 4 million visitors arrive each year to experience the 747,956 acres of wilderness, on 840 miles of hiking trails.

The mountains at Yosemite national park are still growing at a rate of 1 foot per thousand years.

Yosemite Falls is one of the tallest falls in the world, 2425 feet in height. That means in 1000 years, it will be 2426 feet tall, but of course we won’t be around to see that.

There are three Sequoia groves in Yosemite. Sequoias are the largest living things on the planet, with some reaching 300 feet in height, living for 3,000 years.

At 4000 feet high, El Capitan is the largest block of granite in the known world.

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Are you ready for your own adventures? We’d love to come along. And remember, your purchase of our National Park Collection helps support preservation and restoration of America’s Treasures.

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Yosemite Blanket photos: Allie Taylor @alliemtaylor

Pendleton Mountain Weddings

How about a little refreshing chill in July? No matter how hot it gets in Oregon, we are never far from snow thanks to beautiful Mt. Hood, the dormant volcano that dominates the Portland skyline. Mt. Hood provided a wintry setting for these engagement photos of Sarah and Jeffrey, who were married in 2015.

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The happy couple had their engagement photos taken on Mt. Hood. Fittingly, they are is wrapped in a Pendleton blanket woven for Friends of Timberline. This nonprofit group is dedicated to the preservation and conservation of the historic Timberline Lodge (you can read more about the lodge’s fascinating history–and it is fascinating–here).

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We want to say thank-you and congratulations to Sarah and Jeffrey, who were kind enough to share their photos with us. The blanket’s striking monogram was done by a friend of the bride’s mother to commemorate the day of their wedding.

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If you’re interested in the Friends of Timberline blanket, please call the gift shop at 503-272-4436. You can find out about monogramming at our Woolen Mill Store.

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The winter wedding of Celeste Grewe and Joshua Bond took place at Camp Creek Campground in the Mt Hood National Forest. After the bridal party wended its way through a snow-carpeted forest, the couple said “I do” in front of a camp kitchen constructed for the CCC workers in 1936.

Bond wedding photography by Mike at Powers Studios.

Josh and Celeste met while working at a local snowboard shop called Exit Real World (with whom we did a collaboration some years back). The mountain has played an important part in their relationship, so it was fitting that they were married at 2200 ft elevation.

Celeste had this to say: “We wanted our wedding to really reflect Oregon, and especially to give our out-of-town guests a great feel for the history of the state. Both our families raised us with Pendleton products. Pendleton has a longstanding history with Oregon and the Northwest. It was important to incorporate a traditional element into our wedding, which is where we got the blanket ceremony (plus it was really cold that February). It was also a wonderful way to ask our parents to be involved with the ceremony.”

First, the bride and groom were wrapped in Crater Lake National Park blankets by their fathers. This symbolized their separate lives. These blankets were removed and held by their maid of honor and best man. Then the mothers of the bride and groom wrapped them in a white Glacier National Park blanket to symbolize their shared future.

The Crater Lake blankets were presented to the mothers as gifts.  Celeste said of the Glacier blanket, “It’s a show piece in our home.” She is happy with how the national park blankets hearken back to “…the early part of the 1900s, the national parks, and the CCC and WPA, and the 1940s time frame of the ring I inherited from my paternal grandmother.” As you watch the slideshow (photos by Mike at Powers Studios), watch for other Pendleton items on the guests and bridal party.

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To all of our friends who have made Pendleton part of their weddings, we say, best wishes for the future. May your beginnings be sweet, and may your lives together be wonderful. Thanks for letting us be a part of both. We are always happy to monogram your blankets through our Woolen Mill Store. Find beautiful ideas for including blankets in your wedding here and on our Pinterest Weddings board.

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Historic Cameron Trading Post Wedding

July is Wedding Month for us here at Pendleton. We are starting out with a post from APracticalWedding.com, reprinted with permission. This beautiful wedding between Brenda and Donovan incorporates Navajo traditions, including Pendleton blankets. Enjoy!

We Made Our $10K, 120 Guest Modern Navajo Wedding Our Own

These moccasins were made for walking (down the aisle)

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

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BRENDA, PE TEACHER AND GRAD STUDENT & DONOVAN, NETWORK SPECIALIST

SUM-UP OF THE WEDDING VIBE: Respectful and happy mix of traditional and modern cultures.

PLANNED BUDGET: $7,000

ACTUAL BUDGET: $9,800

NUMBER OF GUESTS: 120

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

WHERE WE ALLOCATED THE MOST FUNDS:

We spent most of our funds at the venue—buying hotel rooms for the wedding party, the officiant, photographer, and ourselves. We also spent a good chunk of change on the catering and cake. We wanted to make sure that everyone was comfortable and provided for.

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

WHERE WE ALLOCATED THE LEAST FUNDS:

Decorating. The most expensive decoration we had to purchase was the garlands, roughly $125 a piece. The rose petals were bought at the grocery stores for $12.99 and spread all around. Otherwise, the Pendleton blankets and chairs were items we already had. The rest, like the tulle and the long pieces of fabric, came from Goodwill at the price of $10 total. The ceremonial items for the altar were also items we already owned. Mother Nature took care of the rest!

My dress was incredibly inexpensive as I spent less than $200 to buy and make alterations. My moccasins were a gift and the jewelry were family heirlooms that I wore in honor of my grandmother.

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

WHAT WAS TOTALLY WORTH IT:

The makeup artist! I could not believe the amazing job he did with everyone! We do not wear makeup on a regular basis so it was a relief to see that he knew how to make us look great for such an amazing day.

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

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Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

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Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

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Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

A FEW THINGS THAT HELPED US ALONG THE WAY:

A wedding coordinator was definitely needed as my family had never gone through a wedding of this fashion before. We were mixing traditional Navajo elements with a contemporary wedding, and we needed someone to guide us through the logistics of how it should look. She took care of things like helping us choose a cake, a makeup artist, and a florist and negotiating with the venue to ensure our needs were met. In a traditional Navajo wedding, there is no talk of any of that, as most weddings are performed at the homestead with everyone pitching in. In this case, we needed guidance, and she did a great job!

Our hardworking and caring family was instrumental in getting our wedding set up. The venue would only make sure it was clean and free of weeds. The rest was up to us. My family then took it upon themselves the day before the wedding to show up and set up late into the night to make sure we didn’t worry about it on the wedding day itself. They also provided the appetizers during our social hour and picked up our wedding cake in Flagstaff, Arizona, which was fifty minutes south of Cameron. We also had a trusted family member with lots of knowledge of Navajo tradition officiate the wedding. Then there were all the little details like the game we played, and someone to coordinate the packing and unpacking of everything we brought to the venue—chairs, decorations, tables, etc. The wedding would not have gone as smoothly without their help. Anything is possible with family!

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

MY BEST PRACTICAL ADVICE FOR MY PLANNING SELF:

Invite more people than what you have planned for. I wish I had sent out more invitations than I originally did. I invited exactly sixty people in my circle of family and friends and thought they would all come, and they didn’t, which meant there were some empty seats I could have filled with others. Lesson learned: invite more people than you planned for; it’ll work out in the end. Also, ENJOY IT! I was so consumed with making sure others were having a good time that I forgot that I was supposed to have a good time too. In hindsight, the wedding was beautiful, but I didn’t realize it till the end.

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

FAVORITE THING ABOUT THE WEDDING:

The wedding vows. We wrote our own and I felt that meant more to me than anything. We looked each other in the eyes and nothing mattered. To hear my husband tell me how he felt was an incredible feeling! Also, right before we cut our wedding cake my nephew-in-law and my son sang a traditional Navajo blessingway song. As the song progressed, my family and friends joined in and it was soon a chorus of young and old singing to bless our marriage in a good way. I was overwhelmed with love and happiness that I started to cry. It was then I felt so proud to have the culture that I do and to share it with my husband from that day forth.

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

OTHER NOTES:

Some people asked us why we didn’t have a true Navajo wedding, and the truth was I had already been married in that way. In Navajo tradition, you cannot marry twice out of the Navajo wedding basket so we had to get creative. I love my heritage but also respect the laws of it, and I wanted to marry in a way that was respectful but also reflected both our faith and culture. The wedding could be described as a mix of both Navajo tradition and Native American Church (NAC) practices in a contemporary format. With permission from my mother and aunts, we took what we could from our culture such as the washing of the hands and the exchanging of the dowry and incorporated prayer and blessings done with NAC paraphernalia (hawk feathers and burning of cedar) and then added the contemporary elements like my dad walking me down the aisle and the exchanging of the rings. The result was a wedding that had such deep meaning for both of us.

Arizona Wedding Photographer | LeahAndMark & Co. | Navajo | Cameron Trading Post

Arizona; Wedding; Photographer; LeahAndMark & Co.; Navajo; Cameron Trading Post

This post includes one or more of our sponsors, who are a key part of supporting APW. Check out theDirectory page for Leah and Mark Photography.

THE INFO:

Photography: Leah and Mark | Location: Cameron, AZ on the Navajo Nation | Venue: Historic Cameron Trading Post | Brenda’s Dress and Bridesmaid Dresses: Camille Lavie | Moccasins: City Electric | Ties, Flower Baskets, and Ring Pillow: Touch of Tradition | Wedding Coordination: Yvonne Chavez | Makeup: Shonie Secody | Hair: Northern Arizona Glam Squad

 

That Pendleton Blanket Instameet: Cannon Beach

UpdatedCannonBeach_imageIn April, we hosted an Instameet at Cannon Beach . Photographers came together to connect, share photo opportunities and models, and enjoy Stumptown cold brew, a bonfire and a hotdog roast! People brought their Pendleton blankets and wore their Pendleton flannels. Families, cameras, dogs and above it all, the beauty of Haystack Rock, an oregon Coast icon.

Below is just a sampling of images sent to us. You can find more on Instagram, of course (#thatpnwmeet) . The photos capture the #mypendleton experience through so many lenses (all rights to all images: Pendleton Woolen Mills).

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We want to thank everyone who came out and had a good time.

If you missed the fun at cannon Beach, please don’t be sad. We’re part of another Instameet this Saturday, June 25th 2016, meeting at 4 PM at Trillium Lake on Mount Hood. Square Mile Cider is one of the sponsors, and there will be some Pendleton and MVMT giveaways!

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Hosted by @idkpdx @kyle.pnw @richbacon @temporaryeternal @jordan_littleton – contact them on Instagram for more information.

We can’t wait to see your #mypendleton shots on Instagram.

#seeyouattrillium #mypendleton #pendleton #instameet #pnw #thatpnwlife #oregon #pnwonderland #oregonexplored

 

PDX Beer Week: Are You Prepared?

Today, we want to talk about PDX Beer Week. As the website explains,

Portland Beer Week is eleven days of fun, educational, eye and palate opening eating and drinking events in the greatest beer city on earth. More than just a beer festival, Portland Beer Week is a celebration of craft beer culture and all of its tangents from food pairings to beer ice cream, artwork and design, film and science.

You owe it to yourself to check out the events for this, if you’re in Portland or anywhere near it. And of course, we’re so proud of our own newest entry into the world of craft brews, thanks to ROGUE Ales & Spirits.

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That’s right: Rogue’s Pendleton Pale Ale in a special can that features the label and stripe from the Pendleton blanket honoring Oregon’s own Crater Lake.

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The Crater Lake Lodge recently held a tasting, and we got serious thumbs-up for the brew’s crisp, clear, yet complex flavors.

You can find this beer at select Pendleton stores as well as the usual Rogue locations.

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Taking a Blanket Home: Glacier National Park and the #pendle10park Explorers

It’s our most popular National Park Series blanket; but did you know that it is also our oldest? Yes, the Glacier National Park blanket was originally commissioned by the president of the Great Northern Railway. Like the National Park Service, our blanket is 100 years old this year.

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We asked an intrepid photographer to take this blanket home as part of our celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the National Park Service. She and her crew flew into the park!

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Once they landed, they explored and enjoyed this magnificent northern beauty.

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Glacier Park is located in Northern Montana, along the Canadian border. In fact, Glacier was joined with Canada’s Waterton Park as the first world’s first International Peace Park in 1932. The Goat Haunt Ranger Station is located at the center of the Peace Park, and is the only place in the country where you may cross the border without going through customs. In fact, you will receive a special mountain goat-shaped stamp in your passport to commemorate your crossing.

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Glacier Park scarf                                                                                             Glacier Park water bottle

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Glacier covers 1,583 square miles (over a million acres). It is a vast wilderness most famous for its field of 25 named glaciers. Its largest, Blackfoot Glacier, covers almost ¾ of a square mile. Though 25 glaciers is an impressive sight, in 1850 there were an estimated 150 glaciers in the park. So, you need to see them while you can. They are magnificent.

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Because of its remote location, Glacier has retained most of its flora and fauna, with the exception of the American Plains Bison and the woodland caribou. But at least one four-hooved resident remains and thrives in the park: the mountain goat is Glacier’s official symbol, and adorns the label of the Glacier National Park blanket.

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Glacier Park beanie

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The Great Northern Railway was instrumental in enlarging public awareness of Glacier as a tourist destination. The Great Northern line crossed the Continental Divide near what is now the southern entrance to the park. The president of the railroad, James J. Hill, foresaw a grand opportunity for passenger travel. Great Northern was responsible for much of the building in the park, a unique mix of European architecture and American materials that became known as “parkitecture.”

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During the years of World War II, many of these charming buildings fell into disrepair, and some were lost. Thankfully, more than 350 structures have been saved, and are registered as National Historic Landmarks. The Many Glacier Hotel is one of the largest and most popular of these original structures. Pendleton is excited to be contributing to the hotel’s restoration, and you contribute to our efforts every time you make a purchase from the Pendleton National Park Collection. We will tell you a little more about this in June!

Going-to-the-Sun Road is a fifty-three-mile drive through the park that crosses the Continental Divide at Logan’s Pass. On this ride, known for stunning views, narrow lanes and sheer drop-offs, you can marvel at the glaciers while white-knuckle-gripping your steering wheel. Or, you can go in one of the park’s Jammers, and leave the driving to someone else. The road is a huge draw for the Park, but with an average of almost 140 inches of snow a year, you simply can’t know if a June snowstorm will shut down access. Track the current road status here. And watch a video below!

 

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Glacier park blanket wrap

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Glacier Park mug

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Irey_Glacier-(50)Our thanks to photographer Kristian Irey, one of our favorite #pendle10parks explorers.

Follow her on Instagram:   @kristianirey

More at her website: http://www.kristianirey.com

Shop the Glacier Park collection here: SHOP

Morning in Acadia National Park

Bring your Pendleton blanket and find a spot while it’s still dark. Watch the sky turn from black to deep blue as you listen to the calls of waking birds. Hear the rustle of ocean air as it raises waves to lap against the shoreline and skims through the forests of this peaceful paradise. Look to the distance, where the sky meets the Atlantic, and wait for the first rosy rays to brighten the horizon.

This is how you welcome daylight at Acadia National Park.

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Acadia National Park is our easternmost national park. Its 47,000 acres reserve most of Mount Desert Island off the Atlantic Coast. Cadillac Mountain, named for French explorer Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac, rises on the eastern side of the island. Its granite summit catches the first daylight in the continental United States each New Year’s Day.

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Acadia National Park is part of the area known as the “Dawn land” by its original inhabitants, the Wabaniki people. A confederacy of five First Nations and Native American nations, the Wabaniki includes the Abenaki, Maliseet, Mi’maq, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot people. Ten thousand years before Mount Desert was sighted by Samuel de Champlain, these Algonquian-speaking natives lived in settlements along the Eastern seaboard.

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Acadia’s Atlantic coast is a wonderland of ancient, lichen-covered boulders and rugged shoreline. President Woodrow Wilson established it as Sieur de Monts National Monument on July 8, 1916. On February 26, 1919, it was named Lafayette National Park. The name was changed to Acadia on January 19, 1929, to honor the former French colony of Acadia.

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George W. Dorr is called the “father of Acadia National Park,” but its financial benefactor was definitely John D. Rockefeller, Jr. He paid to develop over 50 miles of gravel carriage trails, with features that include 17 granite bridges and two historic gate lodges that remain today.  Along the paths are many cut granite “coping stones,” which act as rustic guardrails, and are known as “Rockefeller’s teeth.” The Rockefellers helped greatly with the reconstruction of the park after the wildfires of 1947, which destroyed over 10,000 acres.

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Today, as one of the most-visited parks in the country, Acadia welcomes hikers and bicyclists to its trails. Forty different species of mammalian wildlife call Acadia home, including (from the small to the large) red and grey squirrels, chipmunks, white-tailed deer, beaver, porcupine, muskrat, foxes, coyotes, bobcats, black bear and moose. Acadia National Park is aided in preservation efforts by the Friends of Acadia, which has worked to create a private endowment that will maintain the current 44 mile carriage trail system in perpetuity.

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Acadia National Park is waiting to welcome you, and the dawn, every morning. And it’s open now.

Photos by our intrepid #pendle10parks explorers:

Nikolai Karlov – @nikarlov (shots 3, 4, 5 & 6)

David Okoniewski – @oakcanoeski (shots 1 & 2)

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See our Acadia National Park products here: SHOP

GNU and Pendleton for the Women Who Shred

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We did it again for 2015–Beauty and Beast, a winter collaboration with GNU, spearheaded by the amazing Barret Christy.  Beauty is based on our Glacier National Park anniversary blanket design, and Beast is based on our Rainier National Park blanket design.

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See BEAUTY in action here:

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Watch BEAST in action here:

GNU Beast and GNU Beast Splitboard

Beauty is based on our Glacier National Park anniversary blanket design, and Beast is based on our Rainier National Park design. They were designed to help celebrate the centennial of the National Park Service.  That’s why these boards went on the Volcano Tour, a journey down inactive volcanoes all over America.

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Read about the Volcano Tour here: PEOPLE

See the coverage in Snowboarding magazine:

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GNUboard1

More coverage in SELF magazine:

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And keep shredding.

 

 

 

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