Introducing the Zion National Park Blanket

The Zion National Park Blanket

A woman wih a Husky dog sits in Zion National Park wrapped in a Zion blanket.

It is always exciting to introduce our new blankets each year.  Pendleton is especially excited to introduce the Zion National Park blanket, just in time for National Park Week.

Pendleton Zion National park blanket in deep rusty red.

Blanket Stripes: The rich hues of Zion’s red rock formations in rusty red, ochre, and tan are lit by the clear brilliant blue of the afternoon sky in Utah’s desert wonderland.

Zion’s Wonders

Zion Park is a geographical wonderland full of formations and features, all part of a super-sequence of rock units called The Grand Staircase. According to Wikipedia, in the park you’ll find:

…the Temple of Sinawava, which is named for the coyote god of the Paiute Indians…and the Zion–Mount Carmel Tunnel [which] ends at Mount Carmel. On the east side of the park, notable park features include Checkerboard Mesa and the East Temple.

The Kolob Terrace area, northwest of Zion Canyon, features a slot canyon called The Subway, and a panoramic view of the entire area from Lava Point. The Kolob Canyons section, further to the northwest near Cedar City, features Tucupit Point and one of the world’s longest natural archesKolob Arch.

Other notable geographic features of Zion Canyon include Angels LandingThe Great White Throne, the Court of the PatriarchsThe West Temple, Towers of the Virgin, the Altar of Sacrifice, the Watchman, Weeping Rock, and the Emerald Pools.

With 4.3 million visitors per year, this is a park to celebrate!

A girl stands in Zion National Park with the Zion blanket around her shoulders.

Inspiration

The Zion National Park Pendleton blanket features navy, ochre and goldenrod stripes on a brick red background. “We were really inspired by the bold stripe design of a version of the blanket from the 1950s,” says Amanda Coppa, senior merchandise manager of the home division at Pendleton. “The colors were drawn from the beauty and landscape of the park! We had to emphasize the deep red that Utah and Zion are known and loved for.”

Our label features a mountain lion, also known as a cougar, part of the wildlife that lives in Zion’s varied life zones (desert, riparian, woodland, and coniferous forest). Animals range from the petite kangaroo rat (which is adorable, and resembles a very leggy gerbil) to enormous yet agile bighorn sheep. Mule deer, foxes, bats, and rock squirrels are often seen by the park’s visitors, and close to the ground, the amazing variety of rodents draw the park’s birds of prey, which include the California Condor, the Mexican Spotted Owl, and the Peregrine Falcon. All told, Zion is home to over 78 species of mammals, 291 species of birds, 37 species of reptiles and amphibians, and 8 species of fish.

The label of the Zion National Park blanket by Pendleton.

Label: As the sun sets, a solitary mountain lion pauses before the towering sandstone of the Great White Throne.

Our friend and brand ambassador, photographer Kristen Frasca, was able to take the Zion blanket home to its park for the photos in this post.

A husky dog stares at the camera in Zion National Park.

Thanks to her for these gorgeous photos, especially this last one, where her Husky dog is almost more commanding than the scenery! If you’d like to see more of Kristen’s work, please visit her Instagram page: https://www.instagram.com/kristenfrasca/

You can see the blanket and more at our website: Zion National Park by Pendleton

Pendleton label with bald eagle: "Pendleton since 1863 Highest Quality Made in the USA."

 

Making Room on the Loom: Retiring blankets for 2020

Retiring blankets for 2020

Pendleton has been telling stories with our blankets since the first blanket mill opened in 1909. Each year, certain Pendleton blanket designs are retired. These designs are all available at pendleton-usa.com in limited quantities. Is one of these stories yours?

PAINTED HILLS

Pendleton Painted Hills blanket

Rising from the dry plains of Eastern Oregon, bare earth undulates in folds of scarlet, ochre, and yellow. These are the Painted Hills, whose brilliant stripes inspired this design and were created by oxidized mineral deposits in layers of volcanic ash. Adventurers who want to take a road trip into the past can see the hills, visit the nearby John Day Fossil beds and explore the ghost towns of this remote part of Oregon’s landscape.

Learn more here: Painted Hills Blanket

BIGHORN

Pendleton Bighorn blanket

Straddling the borders between Wyoming and Montana, Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area is home to spectacular canyons, clear blue waterways and countless wildlife. In 1825, the Bighorn River called famed mountain man Jim Bridger to build a raft of driftwood and ride it through the foaming rapids. Part of the river was dammed to create Bighorn Lake, but the spectacular canyon it carved remains, named for the Bighorn sheep that travel its rocky, treacherous paths. Located in Montana and Wyoming, about one third of the park unit is located on the Crow Indian Reservation. One quarter of the Pryor Mountains Wild Horse Range lies within the Bighorn Canyon Recreation Area.

Learn more here: Bighorn blanket

TURQUOISE RIDGE

Pendleton Turquoise Ridge blanket

Turquoise is known as the “fallen sky stone.” Prized for its beauty in colors that range from white to aqua to deepest green, turquoise has been used for amulets, beads, jewelry, carvings and more for ten thousand years. Legends of the Navajo, Hopi, Pueblo and Apache nations mention turquoise. In one legend, a tremendous drought brought great suffering to the People of the Earth. When the skies finally opened and shed rain on the People, they rose up to sing, dance and shed tears of joy. Their grateful tears mixed with the rain and seeped into Mother Earth to become Sky Stone.

Learn more here: Turquoise Ridge blanket

BUTTERFLY

Pendleton Butterfly blanket - front view

Sitting Bull challenged us all “to put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children.” Sitting Bull College and the American Indian College Fund memorialize his efforts and echo his belief that education can transform the future. We honor Sitting Bull’s legacy with flower and butterfly designs similar to those on his regalia.  A caterpillar’s transition to butterfly mirrors the transformative power of education—a fitting remembrance for such a visionary leader.  Created exclusively for the American Indian College Fund, a nonprofit organization that helps fund scholarships for Native American students and tribal colleges. Your purchase helps support their honorable mission.

Learn more here: Butterfly blanket

Pendleton Butterfly blanket-reverse view

 

Pendleton label with bald eagle: "Pendleton since 1863 Highest Quality Made in the USA."

Pendleton’s Newest Legendary Blanket – Rodeo Sisters

Pendleton Legendary Series blanket, Rodeo Sisters, held up by two people standing behind it.

Pendleton’s Legendary Series

Each year, we add a new design to this series honoring Native American traditions, legends, and culture. These collectible blankets are symbols of the mutual respect between Pendleton and our first customers. For 2019, we are proud to introduce a blanket designed by Native American Artist Apolonia Susana Santos (1954-2006).

Rodeo Sisters

Front view of "Rodeo Sisters" blanket

Four women draped in blankets stand in a line at sunset in a design by the late artist and activist, Apolonia Susana Santos. Their blankets shine with abalone, quills, small bells and dentalium shells, lifting to reveal moccasins and tooled Western boots. Each hat is uniquely adorned with a band and feathers. This combination of traditional and contemporary delighted the artist, who finished this work and exclaimed, “My sisters are as well-dressed as anyone who shops on Rodeo Drive.”

See more information about the USA-made blanket here (new tab): RODEO SISTERS BLANKET

 

The Artist

Ms. Santos standing in front of a canvas.

Image courtesy of Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie for the First People’s Fund. Learn more about First People’s Fund at (new tab):   https://www.firstpeoplesfund.org/

Ms. Santos (Tygh/Yakima) was a Painter, Serigrapher, Sculptor, Writer and Activist. Her use of rich colors, textures and natural materials created vibrant and dynamic works of art. Her goal was to illuminate historic and contemporary Indigenous life, to bring it forward as a living force.

Susana’s art and her activism were inextricably linked.  She worked tirelessly to preserve Sovereign Traditional fishing rights. As a speaker, she encouraged Native youth to “Remember Who You Are” through writings, public speaking, marches and shows.

Here is the original work on which the blanket is based. Ms. Santos worked with more colors than our looms allow in a blanket, but we love how the design translated. As a note—the artist intended for the word to be pronounced “Ro-DAY-oh,” like the famous shopping district in Beverley Hills.

The original artwork, "Rodeo Sisters," by Susana Santos. All Rights Reserved.

Rodeo Sisters by Susana Santos. All rights reserved.

The Mug

A blanket-wrapped woman's hands holding the Rodeo Sisters mug.

This work’s bright colors and charming graphics worked perfectly on our oversized Pendleton mug. It’s irresistible. And since it’s that time of year, it also makes a perfect gift for the sisters in your life, whether born or chosen.

See more information about the mug here (new tab): RODEO SISTERS MUG

For more Information on the Artist

Ms. Santos’ legacy is a strong one, and friends and loved ones keep it alive with a website. Visit it here for a more complete look at her life, work, and activism. (new tab): Susana Santos

 

New Child-size/Crib-size Pendleton blankets for 2019

Perfect for Cribs and Cuddles

Enjoy a look at Pendleton’s newest child-sized blankets! These soft wool blankets are made in the USA, and are perfect for crib or cuddle. They also make wonderful wall hanging (click the name of each blanket to see more information at pwndleton-usa.com ).

Shared Paths

This beautiful blanket celebrates the path walked in life, from the helpless dependence of a newborn to the self-sufficiency that comes with growing up.

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Shared Paths legend:

The Navajo word for animals, Naaldlooshii, translates as “the-ones-who-trot-people.” The Navajo study an animal’s behavior to understand and learn from it, knowing that appearances say less than actions. Buffalo is mighty and fearsome, but lives gently by grazing on plants. Fox is supple and small, but lives fiercely by hunting. From Deer to Dove, all Earth’s animals move together on Earth’s shared paths in hózhó, the Navajo state of balance and order.

 

Butterfly

This blanket originated as a robe-sized blanket in the American Indian College Fund collection. In the larger version, the pecan-brown side is the face of the blanket. For the child-sized version, we used the more colorful ombred side as the face of the blanket. Sales of both versions support the work of The College Fund, which provides scholarships to tribal colleges for deserving Native American scholars.

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Butterfly legend:

Lakota leader Sitting Bull worked tirelessly for Native American rights. Sitting Bull College on Standing Rock Reservation memorializes his efforts, and demonstrates the American Indian College Fund’s belief that education can transform the future. Sitting Bull’s legacy is honored with flower and butterfly designs similar to those on his regalia. A caterpillar’s transition to butterfly mirrors the transformative impact of education, a fitting remembrance of a man who lived life bravely for his people.

See the full-sized version of this blanket here: Butterfly

 

Morning Cradleboard by Wendy Ponca: Weavers Series

This blanket was designed by Wendy Ponca, a gifted designer and artist who has designed several blankets for Pendleton over the years. It is part of the Weavers Series, which celebrates the artistry of contemporary weavers by incorporating their one-of-a-kind designs into Pendleton blanket designs.

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Morning Cradleboard legend:

This child-sized blanket uses a pattern inspired by finger-woven straps used to secure a baby in a traditional Osage cradleboard. Ponca often creates designs that are tactical by intent, offering Nature’s protection. In Osage, the cradleboard is called o-olo-psha, or “follow-trail-of-animals.” The cradleboard was the beginning of the Road of Life as followed by animals to water and food. People take this same path, beginning life as completely dependent, and working step-by-step to self-sufficiency. As the cradleboard protects the baby, this blanket surrounds a child with warmth and safety on the path to growing up.

Big Medicine

Like the Butterfly blanket above, this blanket began its Pendleton history as a robe-sized blanket. The original Big Medicine blanket was a limited-edition custom run, and each blanket contained hair from a rare white buffalo named…Big Medicine. We wove more of the original coloration using only wool, in both the green version and this new re-color with a charcoal ground.

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Big Medicine legend:

The rare white bison occurs only once in every 10 million births. In 1933, a white buffalo was born in the wild on Flathead tribal lands. He was named “Big Medicine” to reflect his sacred power. Many Native American tribes consider the return of the white buffalo as the fulfillment of an ancient prophecy. Tradition spoke of the coming of a herd of white buffalo. The seven bison on this blanket represent the seven directions: North, South, East, West, Above, Below, and Within. Together, they symbolize wholeness for mankind and the earth. Prayer pipes signify mankind’s communication with the Creator. In the center of the blanket, four hands join within the Circle of Life, representing the joining together of the diverse people of the world and a new beginning. 

See the full-sized versions of this blanket here: Big Medicine

See all our child-sized blankets here: For Crib and Child Pendleton Blankets

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Pendleton by Sunbrella Fabrics

Outdoor Fabrics

The season for outdoor living is here, and Pendleton is ready with Pendleton by Sunbrella outdoor fabrics. See them here: Pendleton Sunbrella Fabrics

A sandy beach, with a folding chair, seven throw pillows, and tent made of Pendleton by Sunbrella fabrics.

Collaboration

Pendleton consistently searches out the best partners for collaborations and shared projects. We have been delighted with our partnership with Glenraven on a line of Pendleton-patterned outdoor fabrics. These Pendleton by Sunbrella fabrics are perfect for all outdoor uses, including awnings, furniture, umbrellas, and anything else you can think of.  They also work indoors, for ultra-durable upholstery.

Glenraven

Like Pendleton, Glenraven (the company that produces Sunbrella fabrics) is a multi-generational family business. Also like Pendleton, Glenraven is headquartered in the USA. And, again, like Pendleton, they have maintained a strong commitment to weaving in the USA. You can see the Glenraven mill in action in this video.

Pendleton by Sunbrella fabrics use dyed threads for weaving, which means vivid, lasting color. That’s a similiarity to wool, which also takes dye all the way to the core.

Sustainability

One key reason Pendleton has been so proud to work with Glenraven lies in the company’s commitment to sustainability. Any used Sunbrella fabric can be returned to the company for recycling and re-use through their Renaissance program. You can read all about that here: Sustainability and Sunbrella

Did you know you can set a Sunbrella fabric in a bucket of bleach, and it won’t change its color? These fabrics will not run, stain, or fade…ever. The world’s clumsiest person can’t ruin Sunbrella fabrics, though you can watch someone try in this video:

The “Indoor Durability Challenge” will give you an idea of what Sunbrella fabrics can withstand.

Decor

We use these fabrics in our store designs, and choose them when our stores need awnings, as in our Pendleton store in Eugene, Oregon. They make an impact indoors or out, as you can see in this adorable camping trailer interior by @stagecoachdetaildesign that artfully uses Pendleton by Sunbrella fabrics. 

A bed in a restored vintage Airstream trailer with a Pendleton Chief Joseph blanket.

 

 

The interior of a restored vintage Airstream trailer holds a daybed dressed with throw pillows made of Pendleton Sunbrella fabrics.

For information on their work and design services, contact information is here: STAGECOACH detail and design

You can purchase pillows at our website: Pendleton by Sunbrella

A sandy beach and a tent made of Pendleton by Sunbrella outdoor fabrics, holding a group of throw pillows.

We also stock Pendleton by Sunbrella fabrics at our Woolen Mill Store – call the store directly for availability and information. Info here: www.woolenmill.store

Happy summer!

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Pendleton Fabric Expertise – A Story of Generations

A Century of Weaving

Pendleton textiles are renowned for their quality, beauty and craftsmanship. Where did we learn to make fabric like this? Our expertise is generational, earned over a century of weaving in America.

The Beginning

The company known today as Pendleton Woolen Mills actually had its genesis in one mill; the Thomas Kay Woolen Mill in Salem, Oregon, founded by Thomas Kay, a master weaver from England.

A photo of the Thomas Kay Woolen Mill in Salem, Orebon. This 2.5 story building is red brick with rows of white-trimmed windows.

Thomas Kay brought extensive knowledge to his own mill, after a career that started in his childhood as a bobbin boy, and grew into management of large mills in the UK and the US before he finally opened his own. He specialized in fabrics for tailoring, and produced the first bolt of worsted wool west of the Mississippi.

The Next Generation

His daughter, Fannie Kay, became her father’s protégé in her teen years. She learned weaving and mill management at her father’s side. Fannie Kay became Fannie Bishop upon her marriage to Charles P. Bishop, a prominent Salem merchant. Their three sons opened the Pendleton Woolen Mill in Pendleton, Oregon, in 1909. That mill is still running today! The Kay/Bishop history extends through today’s Pendleton. The Bishop family still owns and operates Pendleton Woolen Mills. And Pendleton’s fabric expertise grows each year, as we challenge ourselves to do more with wool.

Today’s Mills

Fabric weaving was once a major industry in the United States, with more than 800 mills in operation. Today only a handful of those mills remain.  Our facilities in Pendleton, Oregon, and Washougal, Washington, are two of the very few woolen mills still operating in North America.

Pendleton, Oregon

This photo is a vintage postcard image of the Pendleton, Oregon woolen mill. The building is grey brick, with rows of windows trimmed in white, and large front doors on the first, second and third floors at the front of the building.

The Pendleton, Oregon mill opened in 1909, taking over a defunct wool-scouring plant on the banks of the Columbia River and transforming it into a full mill under the direction of Clarence, Roy and Chauncey Bishop. The location had been scouted by Fannie Kay Bishop, who encouraged her sons to make use of the existing building, the nearby Columbia River, and the supply of high quality wool fleece available from local sheep ranchers.

The company’s original products were wool blankets for Native American customers. Today, the Pendleton mill is open for tours. Travelers can watch those world-famous blankets being woven on two-story looms.

Washougal, Washington

Our Washougal facility sits on the banks of the Columbia River at the entry to the scenic Columbia River Gorge. The Washougal community helped fund the startup of this mill in 1912, and it has been a major employer in this small Washington town ever since.

A vintage sepia-toned photo of the Washougal woolen mill owned by Pendleton Woolen Mills. The mill is two stories tall and in the photo, it is dwarfed by two water towers.

The additional mill gave Pendleton the ability to weave a wider variety of fabrics.

AirLoom Merino (found in our Sir Pendleton shirts) and Umatilla woolen fabric (found in so many of our flannel shirt styles) are both woven in Washougal, as well as fabrics for the women’s line.

Its roots may be historic, but the Washougal mill is a 300,000-square-foot model of modern efficiency. Mill owners come from around the world to tour it, and to learn about Pendleton’s weaving techniques, dyeing processes, and fabric finishing.

The Fabrics

Pendleton Woolen Mills has maintained the quality and craftsmanship of its textiles through decade upon decade of manufacturing in its own facilities. This allows us to maintain quality control from start to finish, from fleece to fashion. Our state-of-the-art computer dyeing technology controls water, dyes, heat, and more. Carding machines, looms and finishing processes are also computer-controlled, allowing for minute adjustments to guarantee uniformity of weave, weight and hand.

Eleven different Pendleton woolen fabrics in a line, showing the different weights and patterns woven on the Pendleton looms.

We can perfect it because we control it, and it shows in our fabrics. We will be exploring some of those special fabrics in the months to come. We hope you’ll follow along.

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New for Spring 2019 – Pagosa Springs Blanket

A very stylish living room, with a Pendleton Pagosa Springs blanket draped over a brown leather sofa.

New blankets are here!

Our newest blankets are arriving at the website, and you’re going to love them; Pagosa Springs is a beauty. See it here: Pagosa Springs

Pagosa Springs

The Grand Prismatic Springs.

Pagosa Springs is woven in turquoise and earth tones inspired by hot springs all over the world, like the Grand Prismatic Spring here in the USA.

The front of the Pendleton Pagosa Springs blanket.

The reverse has a light ground, for completely different look. That can be one of the beautiful benefits of jacquard loom weaving.

Reverse of the Pendleton Pagosa Springs blankets.

Pagosa Springs:

Long ago, the Southern Utes of Colorado told of a plague that medicine men could not cure. A council gathered on the riverbank and built a gigantic fire, danced and prayed for help, then fell into a deep sleep. When they woke, the fire was replaced by a pool of fragrant hot water. They bathed and were healed by the springs, naming it “Pah” (water) and “Gosa” (boiling). In the center of this design, blue hot springs rise through a medallion of fire to bring peace and health.

Pagosa Hot Springs is the world’s deepest geothermal hot spring.  Check it out here: Pagosa Hot Springs

A woman and child sit in a white hanging chair, sittong on a Pendleton Pagosa Springs blanket.

Spring is a beautiful time for Pendleton.

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