Special Gifts for Special Grads – Pendleton Blankets

A young woman lays on her stomach on a Pendleton Olympic National park blanket, in a field of tall, dry grass. She is painting a watercolor.

Photo by Hannah Ward Art

Graduations and Journeys

Life is a journey, and a graduate is setting out on an entirely new path. A Pendleton blanket makes a perfect companion on that journey; warm, soft, with made-in-the-USA quality that will last for generations. Here are a few ideas for your new grad.

Park Series Blankets

Does your graduate love the great outdoors? Consider our National Park Series blankets. These striped patterns are some of our favorites, with colors that reflect the geography and flora of the parks for which they’re named. The blankets and throws have special patches, inspired by the window decals travelers were given at the gates of America’s earliest parks.

In a vintage photograph from the 1920s, a smiling woman in a Model T Ford points at her windshield to show off her National Park stickers.

The Glacier National Park blanket, by Pendleton. A white background with a stripe of black, yellow, red and green at each end.

Glacier Park, shown above, is a favorite. Size selection varies by style, but these blankets can come in twin, full, queen and a new throw size. See them here: Pendleton National Park Series blankets

For Those Who Serve

For the graduate who is entering the United States Marine Corps, nothing could say “congratulations” more than the new The Few, The Proud blanket. This special design is approved by the USMC.

Marines_Pendleton_blanket

The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. Each element signifies the Marine Corps mission and legacy. The anchor reflects the naval tradition of the Marines as part of the Department of the Navy. The globe represents readiness to serve in any part of the world. The bald eagle, symbol of America, holds a ribbon in its beak that reads “Semper Fidelis,” or “Always Faithful,” a reference to the unending valor and loyalty of the Corps.

See this blanket here: The Few, The Proud

Off to the Dorms

For those headed to the dorms, a Pendleton Camp Blanket is a terrific choice.

Yakima_Camp_Beauty

This 100% wool blanket is inspired by the bedroll blankets found on the packs and saddles of trail riders and shepherds in the American west. At night, these blankets were unrolled for a night by the campfire, under the stars. Not a bad companion for a new grad’s journey!

A Yakima Camp blanket in heathered taupe, with bands of red, green and tan at each end. By Pendleton.

There are quite a few color and size options. See them here: Camp blankets

Also available in a throw size here: Camp Throws

For the Heroes at Home

Some graduates begin training as an EMT and/or firefighter as soon as they are done with high school. Firefighters are a special breed, who run into the buildings that most of us run out of. If you have a graduate who will be training for this profession, consider the Wildland Heroes blanket.

The Pendleton Wildland Heroes blanket shows bands of geometric designs that also include evergreen trees, with a dark forest green background, light blue trangles to symbolize water, and yellow and orange accents that represent the threat of wildfires.

The scent of smoke fills the air. An orange glow lights the horizon. Mother Nature is on alert, and Wildland Firefighters stand ready to defend her. These brave men and women hold the line against fire’s destruction with team effort; digging lines, running hoses, saving structures when they can. In Pendleton’s tribute to Wildland Firefighting, bands of deep forest alternate with lines of flame, lighting trees endangered by flame. A portion of this blanket’s sales help the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, which supports families and injured firefighters in times of need.

See more information here: Wildland Heroes

A Favorite

And you can’t go wrong with an iconic pattern like the Chief Joseph design.

The Chief Joseph blanket in grey, turquoise, green, white, and orange,by Pendleton

It’s available in a color and size for everyone, including a special cherry pink that benefits N.A.R.A.’s Native women’s health program.

See all your options here: Chief Joseph Blankets

A Pendleton blanket is the gift of a lifetime. If you’re looking for a different type of gift, large or small, we have plenty of other suggestions at Pendleton-usa.com. And wherever your graduates are heading, we wish them well.

PWM_USA_label

 

 

NARA for Native Women’s Healthcare and #givingtuesday

NARA: Women's healthcare staff and advocates at the Native Women's Health Clinic supported by a special Pendleton Chief Joseph design.

A special night for women’s health care

In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Indigenous Pink Day, NARA partnered with the American Indian Cancer Foundation and EPIC Imaging to provide a special mammogram night for AI/AN women on Oct 4, 2018, where they featured the cherry Chief Joseph blanket.  They also had a “wear pink” Indigenous Pink Day campaign at NARA, with information about breast cancer and how to schedule a mammogram in their clinic lobby.  Staff and volunteers at all locations wore special pink shirts!

More weomen's healthcare staff and advocates at the NARA Native Women's Health outreach clinic.

Thanks to all who participated!

Pendleton’s donation

Throughout October and November, Pendleton has increased our ongoing donation to NARA’s Women’s Wellness Program to support breast cancer awareness and treatment in Native American communities in the Northwest. 20% of proceeds from the Chief Joseph blanket and baby blanket in the special “Cherry” color support NARA’s work with Native women. This bold and beautiful blanket makes a difference.

A cherry-pink Chief Joseph blanket, folded and draped on a windowseat. This special blanket benefits the Native American women's clinic at NARA.

A purchase of this beautiful cherry-pink blanket benefits the women’s health program of NARA, the Native American Rehabilitation Association of the Northwest, INC.

NARA is a Native American-owned, Native American-operated, nonprofit agency.

The NARA logo featured a flying eagle.

NARA Women’s Wellness Program

The NARA Women’s Wellness Program provides culturally tailored breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women (and other women in need), 21 to 64 years of age.  These women include underserved, uninsured, underinsured and those that are rarely or have never been screened for breast and cervical cancer.  In additional to screening and diagnostic services, NARA offers assistance with referral coordination, transportation and navigation of health care appointments.

Thank you for making a difference!

Pendleton logo label that shows a drawing of a bald eagle, and the words: "Pendleton since 1863 Highest Quality Made in the USA." This blanket is sewn onto all Pendleton's traditional wool blankets, which are still 00% made in the USA.

Special Blanket Makes a Difference for Native American Women

October/November Awareness

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and November is Native American Heritage month. Throughout October and November, Pendleton is increasing our ongoing donation to NARA’s Women’s Wellness Program to support breast cancer awareness and treatment in Native American communities in the Northwest. 20% of proceeds from the Chief Joseph blanket and baby blanket in the special “Cherry” color will support NARA’s work with Native women. This bold and beautiful blanket makes a difference. See it here: Cherry Chief Joseph

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NARA

A purchase of this beautiful cherry-pink blanket benefits the women’s health program of NARA.  NARA is a Native American-owned, Native American-operated, nonprofit agency. Learn more here: Native American Rehabilitation Association of the Northwest, INC.

NARA Logo.png

The Native American Rehabilitation Association (NARA) Women’s Wellness Program provides culturally tailored breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services for American Indian and Alaska Native women. NARA works to bring care to underserved, uninsured, and underinsured women, and those who are rarely or never screened for breast and cervical cancer.  In additional to screening and diagnostic services, NARA offers assistance with referral coordination, transportation and navigation of health care appointments.

Yolanda Moisa

We had a conversation with Yolanda Moisa, most current director of the newest clinic run by NARA and the BCCP Director (Breast and Cervical Cancer Program), to learn about NARA’s women’s health program.

PWM: Can you tell me about your organization’s mission?

YM: Our mission at NARA is to provide education, physical and mental health services and substance abuse treatment that is culturally appropriate to American Indians, Alaska Natives and anyone in need. Our purpose is to achieve the highest level of physical, mental and spiritual well being for American Indians and Alaska Native people.

Our women’s health program is a critical part of our larger physical health outreach.  It’s the women who make this program so rewarding.  Throughout the 20 years of this program, we have helped women from all backgrounds. Each person is unique and has a story to tell. We save lives daily.  Our hope and goal is prevention and no cases of cancer ever, however, the reality is that catching cancer sooner than later makes for a much better prognosis.

PWM: Can you tell us about some of your more rewarding moments?

YM: There are so many stories of success and how we help women, we are helping generations of women.  A story that comes to mind is that we had a woman who had just moved to the Portland area and came in for another visit and our staff noticed she was due for her yearly women’s exams.  When she received her results from her mammogram a small lump in her breast was detected. She did find out that it was cancerous, it was caught at Stage 1.  We walked her through her options and our team was there to answer all her questions.  Just having someone listen to her and help manage the many appointments that come with cancer treatment was a comfort.  More importantly, she brought her daughter in and sisters in to be tested, again changing lives.

PWM: When did NARA form and how many people have you served?

NARA has been in the community since 1970, and offering medical care since 1993. Since 1996 we have helped Women receive 5,160 MAMS and 6,391 PAPS.  We have two clinics, one at North Morris Street and our new Wellness Center on East Burnside. The women’s health program is housed in our clinic at 12360 E Burnside, Portland, OR 97233. The program offers women’s services at both clinics where screenings, and references for mammograms to low income, uninsured Native women. We want to provide early detection for breast and cervical cancer. As an urban facility, we’ve been able to serve members from over 250 tribes, nations, bands, who are all able to access any of the services here.

PWM: That’s fantastic. What drew you to this program, Yolanda?

YM: I came to NARA after many years in the corporate legal field. I’m a member of the Tule River Tribe in Porterville CA, and it was always my intention to return to working with Native Americans–to give back. Throughout my career I have volunteered and advocated for women and children.  Coming to NARA was like finding a family that truly “got it”, understanding what it means to help our community.  I see my family in the many faces in our waiting rooms: my grandmother, aunties, uncles, mother and siblings. I came in as a grants manager and was here for almost two years. I became clinic director  two years ago, and was pleased when we received a HRSA grant that helped set up the pharmacy and pediatric program at the site. I’ve been here close to five years and have continued to appreciate all that NARA does. It’s pretty amazing!

PWM: Are there special challenges within the Native American community?

YM: For Native women, there is a history of trauma around medical services. Along with assault, abuse and harassment, there is a documented history of forced sterilization. This painful history plays into fear and mistrust of medicine.

Our CDC (Center for Disease and Control)  grant  allows us to do something special for Native American and Alaska Native women—weekend clinic sessions that we call the Well Women’s Event. These events are designed as a safe place for women.  It’s not uncommon to have generations of women from families come together. The grandmother, mother and daughter will all come for the daughter’s first mammogram for support.  We open the clinic to women only. Our guests are welcomed to a Native crafts night, and a women-only talking circle. The nurse on staff gives one-on-one advice and education.  We offer cervical cancer screens here, and transport woman safely to and from an off-site mammogram facility.

Any woman who gets a screening receives culturally specific books about women’s health, including  “Journey Woman: A Native Woman’s Guide to Wellness”. Through the generosity of Pendleton we were allowed to use  Pendleton art forms in the books.

Women's wellness texts distributed by NARA. Pendleton patterns are used with permission in these culturally specific publications that help guide Native American women through health and wellness screenings.

When women see themselves in health materials, it builds trust and adds warmth to what can be a very cold environment. Some women come just for the community events, and that’s fine. Our goal is to make women’s healthcare safe and communal, almost a celebration of womanhood.

PWM: How does the Pendleton blanket help?

YM: Each purchase of the blanket generates a donation to NARA. The money will go into the women’s health program, helping us expand our outreach to various underserved and marginalized communities within Portland.  We hope to start momentum that leads to continuing healthcare. If we can save one life, we’re proud.  Hopefully with these added donations we will continue to help many more women.  Thank you Pendleton!

The Chief Joseph blanket in a special Cherry color that benefits NARA.If you would like to help NARA through direct donation, feel free to contact Yolanda Moisa at ymoisa@naranorthwest.org or 503-224-1044.

If you would like to help through the purchase of the special edition Chief Joseph blanket (Cherry color only), see it HERE:

Chief Joseph.

Chief Joseph child-size blanket

 

What’s on the menu? Pendleton Blankets at Eugene’s Inn at the 5th.

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The Inn at the 5th

When you’re welcomed to the Inn at the 5th in Eugene, Oregon, expect something special. This boutique hotel is earning glowing reviews on Trip Advisor, thanks to its warm, modern decor and attention to every detail of hospitality and comfort.

The lobby of the Inn at the 5th in Eugene, Oregon

Pendleton Blanket Menu

One special detail is the Inn’s Pendleton blanket menu. Guests can let the staff know which of five Pendleton blankets best suit their style.

BLankets on the menu at the Inn at the 5th in Eugene, Oregon

The blanket is then hand-delivered with a note to the room’s butler’s pantry. If a guest wants to purchase a blanket, a discount card can be redeemed downstairs at the Pendleton boutique adjacent to the Inn.

Read more about the amenities here: Inn at the 5th

And of course, if you aren’t planning a trip to Eugene anytime soon, we have our own menu of beautiful blanket choices here: Pendleton Blankets

A Special Blanket Supports Native Women’s Health

October – Breast Cancer Awareness

We thought October would be a terrific time to tell you about a special version of our Chief Joseph blanket.

70000_1323_ALT3.jpg

A purchase of this beautiful cherry-pink blanket benefits the women’s health program of NARA, the Native American Rehabilitation Association of the Northwest, INC.

NARA is a Native American-owned, Native American-operated, nonprofit agency. Learn more here: NARA

NARA Logo.png

NARA – outreach and care

NARA is an Urban Indian Health Program that provides integrated healthcare in the Portland Metropolitan area.  They offer a broad array of services including medical, dental, mental health, addiction treatment, and culturally based services.  Culture is a critical and integral part of everything they do.

We had a conversation with Yolanda Moisa, most current director of the newest clinic run by NARA and the BCCP Director (Breast and Cervical Cancer Program), to learn about NARA’s women’s health program.

PWM: Can you tell me about your organization’s mission?

YM: Our mission at NARA is to provide education, physical and mental health services and substance abuse treatment that is culturally appropriate to American Indians, Alaska Natives and anyone in need. Our purpose is to achieve the highest level of physical, mental and spiritual well being for American Indians and Alaska Native people.

Our women’s health program is a critical part of our larger physical health outreach.  It’s the women who make this program so rewarding.  Throughout the 20 years of this program, we have helped women from all backgrounds. Each person is unique and has a story to tell. We save lives daily.  Our hope and goal is prevention and no cases of cancer ever, however, the reality is that catching cancer sooner than later makes for a much better prognosis.

PWM: Can you tell us about some of your more rewarding moments?

YM: There are so many stories of success and how we help women, we are helping generations of women.  A story that comes to mind is that we had a woman who had just moved to the Portland area and came in for another visit and our staff noticed she was due for her yearly women’s exams.  When she received her results from her mammogram a small lump in her breast was detected. She did find out that it was cancerous, it was caught at Stage 1.  We walked her through her options and our team was there to answer all her questions.  Just having someone listen to her and help manage the many appointments that come with cancer treatment was a comfort.  More importantly, she brought her daughter in and sisters in to be tested, again changing lives.

PWM: When did NARA form and how many people have you served?

NARA has been in the community since 1970, and offering medical care since 1993. Since 1996 we have helped Women receive 5,160 MAMS and 6,391 PAPS.  We have two clinics, one at North Morris Street and our new Wellness Center on East Burnside. The women’s health program is housed in our clinic at 12360 E Burnside, Portland, OR 97233. The program offers women’s services at both clinics where screenings, and references for mammograms to low income, uninsured Native women. We want to provide early detection for breast and cervical cancer. As an urban facility, we’ve been able to serve members from over 250 tribes, nations, bands, who are all able to access any of the services here.

PWM: That’s fantastic. What drew you to this program, Yolanda?

YM: I came to NARA after many years in the corporate legal field. I’m a member of the Tule River Tribe in Porterville CA, and it was always my intention to return to working with Native Americans–to give back. Throughout my career I have volunteered and advocated for women and children.  Coming to NARA was like finding a family that truly “got it”, understanding what it means to help our community.  I see my family in the many faces in our waiting rooms: my grandmother, aunties, uncles, mother and siblings. I came in as a grants manager and was here for almost two years. I became clinic director  two years ago, and was pleased when we received a HRSA grant that helped set up the pharmacy and pediatric program at the site. I’ve been here close to five years and have continued to appreciate all that NARA does. It’s pretty amazing!

PWM: Are there special challenges within the Native American community?

YM: For Native women, there is a history of trauma around medical services. Along with assault, abuse and harassment, there is a documented history of forced sterilization. This painful history plays into fear and mistrust of medicine.

Our CDC (Center for Disease and Control)  grant  allows us to do something special for Native American and Alaska Native women—weekend clinic sessions that we call the Well Women’s Event. These events are designed as a safe place for women.  It’s not uncommon to have generations of women from families come together. The grandmother, mother and daughter will all come for the daughter’s first mammogram for support.  We open the clinic to women only. Our guests are welcomed to a Native crafts night, and a women-only talking circle. The nurse on staff gives one-on-one advice and education.  We offer cervical cancer screens here, and transport woman safely to and from an off-site mammogram facility.

Any woman who gets a screening receives culturally specific books about women’s health, including  “Journey Woman: A Native Woman’s Guide to Wellness”. Through the generosity of Pendleton we were allowed to use  Pendleton art forms in the books.

books.jpg

When women see themselves in health materials, it builds trust and adds warmth to what can be a very cold environment. Some women come just for the community events, and that’s fine. Our goal is to make women’s healthcare safe and communal, almost a celebration of womanhood.

PWM: How does the Pendleton blanket help?

YM: Each purchase of the blanket generates a donation to NARA. The money will go into the women’s health program, helping us expand our outreach to various underserved and marginalized communities within Portland.  We hope to start momentum that leads to continuing healthcare. If we can save one life, we’re proud.  Hopefully with these added donations we will continue to help many more women.  Thank you Pendleton!

The Blanket

70000_1323

If you would like to help NARA through direct donation, feel free to contact Yolanda Moisa at ymoisa@naranorthwest.org or 503-224-1044.

If you would like to help through the purchase of the special edition Chief Joseph blanket, see it HERE: Chief Joseph.

Greg Hatten and the Great Outdoors: Moved by the Wallowas.

An icy Wallowa River.

National Park Week

Ed. Note: It’s National Park Week, and in the spirit of outdoor adventures, we’re sharing excerpts from a post by our friend Greg Hatten of Wooden Boat Adventures fame. He  took a trip into the snowy Wallowa Mountains this spring (or what’s passing for spring here in Oregon), and experienced nowcats, fly-fishing, Pendleton blankets, hot beverages and lobster tails. Read on below.

Greg’s Wallowas Story

Six hundred pounds of Oregon Elk thundered up the small freestone creek in a desperate dash for life as a pack of gray wolves gave chase. In a final powerful move to avoid the wolves at her heels, she wheeled left and attempted to jump up the six foot bank from the bottom of the creek bed. Her fate was sealed when her front legs sunk to her shoulders in four feet of deep snow. The trailing wolves, running lightly on a thin layer of crust, caught her quickly and ended the struggle for life at the top of the bank in a flurry of fangs and flesh.

Snow prints told the story.

Snowcats on the trail in the Wallowa Range.

It was a solemn moment in the middle of a remote area that had taken us several hours and a variety of vehicles to reach. Our destination was a cabin by the river…We reached the little cabin, started a fire, unloaded gear, and propped our wet boots by the stove to dry out.

Boots dring by the woodstove with a Pendleton Buffalo Creation coffee mug in the foreground.

Clearly this was going to be a steelhead trip to remember… but the Pendleton Whisky after dinner would challenge us to recall the details.

The Next Morning…

… was clear and crisp. I slipped on my waders, slipped out the cabin door and hiked to the pools upstream.

Wadrers, a wool shirt, and a Pendleton blanket on the front porch of a cabin.

We fished hard all day – upstream, downstream, swinging, nymphing, plunking….. we tried it all with the same result. A fishless day – not at all uncommon or unfamiliar to steelhead fishermen…. and so, we headed to the cabin for ribs and lobster.

After another elegant dinner I grabbed my Therm-a-Rest cot, my sleeping bag, and my Pendleton blanket and headed for the river to do some open air winter sleeping down by the river.

Greg Hatten sits on the banks of the Wallowa River, sipping a warm drink.

I explained it as a field test for winter gear – but I really wanted a closer connection to the river, the valley and the Nez Perce tribe of Native Americans that called this place “home” more than two hundred and fifty years before us. I looked up at the stars in the night sky and thought of them in this place.

Snowy riverbanks, and a cold river.

My breath was heavy and my nose was cold but the familiar sound of running water over rocks and the rawness of the night was something I’ll never forget. The image of the slaughtered Elk was something else I’ll never forget and a few times during the night imagined I was being surrounded by the Minam pack of wolves that patrols this valley and did my best to snore loudly hoping to be mistaken for a hibernating bear. When I woke to the first light of dawn, I was pretty glad I hadn’t been eaten by wolves and figured either they thought I was a sleeping bear, a mad dog, or a middle aged fly fisherman that wouldn’t taste very good…. or maybe the wolf pack was only in my dreams. I hiked up to the cabin and made coffee.

A bright fire in the woodstove.

A plaid wool Pendleton shirt hangs on a pole near a snowy riverbank.

Catch of the day; a nice trout displayed by a fisherman.

…it was time to pack up and leave the valley. We made our way back up the steep narrow trail and near the top we stopped for one final look down at the river snaking it’s way between the mountains of the Eagle Cap Wilderness.

History

In 1877, 800 members of the Nez Perce tribe and their 2,000 horses fled the valley and headed Northeast in a desperate attempt to elude the pursuers hot on their trail. They were searching for a new home and chased by the U.S. army for over 1,000 miles and three months across Idaho and parts of Montana before a final bloody battle less than 40 miles from the safety of Canada. It was the battle in the foothills of the Bear’s Paw Mountains where the Nez Perce were finally forced to surrender and Chief Joseph is said to have pronounced to the remaining Chiefs and the U.S. Army “Hear me, my chiefs! I am tired. My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever.”

A Chief Joseph blanket hangs on a tree by a riverbank.

As I looked over the raw beauty of the Wallowa valley with the steep dark green Mountains on all sides dusted with a fine layer of white snow tumbling into the river below, his words took on a depth that made me ache for his people and the way of life they gave up. I was moved by the Wallowas.

Icy riverbanks, frosty vegetation.

Read the full post here: Moved by the Wallowas

All photography courtesy Greg Hatten

A khaki color Chief Joseph blanket by Pendleton.

See product here:

Chief Joseph blanket (tan)

Pendleton Buffalo Creation mug

Men’s wool shirts by Pendleton

Brand Ambassador Profile: Brandon Burk

Brandon-Burk-Photography; Brandon poses in a Pendleton coat.

(outerwear)

Brand Ambassador interview

Brandon, tell us a little about where you live and what you do.

I reside in Salt Lake City, Utah with my two daughters, Ella and Eden.  I specialize in wedding portraiture, family portraiture and product photography. Photography is my full time job. I enjoy creating everyday. I am extremely organized, meticulous and detail oriented.

I love exploring the great outdoors. I love hiking, A-frame cabins, leather goods, mountains, ranches, lakes, canoes and evergreen trees. I rarely go anywhere without my camera, tripod, and Toyota FJ Cruiser.

Photography Experience: 10 years

Brandon-Burk-Photography: a photo of a man's feet in boots and Pendleton socks, in front of a car grill.

(socks)

What drew you to photography? Was it always your passion?

Growing up I always loved to express my creativity. My junior year of high school I took a photography course where I learned to shoot and process film. After high school I served a two-year mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I was located in Atlanta, Georgia during that time. In Atlanta, I focused full-time on serving the Lord. After my return home I started doing photography as my occupation and the rest was history.

Brandon-Burk-Photography: A man in a plaid shirt and hat with his back to the camera in front of an aspen grove.

(wool shirts)

How did you learn your craft?

 I started my photography career working at a upscale photography studio in my early twenties. No college – just hands on experience. The photographer I worked under had been in the business for some 25 years. While I was working at the studio, I was simultaneously building my own clientele on the side. Once I had enough clients, I left the studio to work my own photography business full-time.

Brandon-Burk-Photography: a still live of a bag, axe, boots, scarf and beanie.

(socks)

Your photos have a refined sense of arrangement and composition. How long does it take you to set up a shot?

A set up for a product photo can take anywhere from 15 minutes to a full hour. Flat lay photography definitely takes longer. Over the last year I have also created pieces where the product and elements are built upward, vertically – I call them “Vertical Builds”. The key here is to build different visual levels: high, low and medium height levels. I did a flat lay photography job for my good friends over at Clif Bar where I spent around one hour setting up each photograph in addition to the 30 hours searching antique shops and Ebay for all the vintage items I used in my set up. You can view my Clif Bar photos here .

BrandonBurkPhotography.com A man poses with a lantern in the Utah desert at night.

(wool shirts)

Do you have any advice for people who look up to you?

I would advise to work hard at your craft, pay attention to the smallest details, be original and create often.

Brandon-Burk-Photography: two dogs pose on a Chief Joseph blanket.

(blanket)

That is wonderful advice. What draws you to Heritage brands?

Heritage brands are classic and timeless. They never go out of style. Made in America manufacturing is important to me. I love the quality of workmanship that comes with a good Heritage brand.

A still life of sproting and Pendleton goods by Brandon Burke Photography

(outerwear)

A Yellowstone national park blanket on a wooden rail fence

 What is the secret to the distinctive and warm look of your photography (or as much of the secret as you’d like to share)?

Some key items that make up my style of photography on my Instagram account. Lighting, attention to detail, warm brown tones, reclaimed wood and adventurous vibes.

A man and woman wrapped in a Chief Josephblanket

(blanket)

Are there other photographers you admire that we should check out?

One of my favorite photographers is Roberto Dutesco. He photographs wild horses. I love how it’s his sole focus. Website: dutescoart.com

A couple embraces in their wedding attire, wrapped in a Pendleton Chief Joseph blanket

(blanket)

What do you love most about Instagram?

I have always loved creating. Instagram is the perfect way for sharing my creativity to the world. I also love being able to see what others are creating. Instagram has been a great way to improve and sharpen my photography skills. I am able to analyze which photographs my following like best and continue to create imagery based around that.

A couple in the snow, wrapped in a blanket

(blanket)

 What made you decide to showcase your sense of fashion on Instagram?

I first started my account showcasing some of my scenic and portraiture work. As I continued to spend more time on Instagram, I started to network and follow other people posting their sense of style and threads. It slowly evolved into me starting to do the same.

Brandon Burk by an A-frame cabin.

(blanket)

Where do you find inspiration?

One person who inspires me is Albert Einstein. He had the most incisive mind! I love his creativity and unique way of thinking. I am also inspired by a lot of what I see on Instagram. It’s amazing how much better of a photographer Instagram can make you. Every image you put out there is a open critique for the world to see, comment, like or dislike etc.

A couple kisses by a lake, wrapped in blankets.

(blanket)

What have you learned from creating your art?

There are people who do art to do art and then there are people who do art to make a living. As artists a lot of us are perfectionists. We want to hang onto our art and work on it for days and months making it perfect. We have a hard time letting go of it. To be a full time artist and make a living at doing so, you have to learn to let go of your art – get the job done and move onto the next one.

A leather chair and hooked wool pillow by BrandonBurkPhotography.com

(pillows)

What are some of your favorite Pendleton pieces?

I love the Chief Joseph Blankets – I use these all the time in portrait sessions.

A man wrapped in a blanket stands on a mountain road.

(blanket)

A leather chair and a buffalo wool pillow

(pillows)

I also love my Pendleton pillows and my Sky Stone Turquoise Gorge Jacket.

A man stands in the woods holding a pair of boots and holding a bag, wearing a Pendleton blanket coat.

(outerwear)

Website: BrandonBurkPhotography.com

Instagram:@BrandonBurkPhotography & @UtahWeddingPhotographer

Facebook: facebook.com/brandonburkphotography

A Special Blanket Supports Native Women’s Health

Breast Cancer Awareness month

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and we thought that would be a terrific time to tell you about a special version of our Chief Joseph blanket.

A window seat with a white cushion and the special cherry pink color Chief Joseph blanket.

NARA

A purchase of this beautiful cherry-pink blanket benefits the women’s health program of NARA, the Native American Rehabilitation Association of the Northwest, INC.  NARA is a Native American-owned, Native American-operated, nonprofit agency.

NARA Logo - an eagle in flight

NARA is an Urban Indian Health Program that provides integrated healthcare in the Portland Metropolitan area.  They offer a broad array of services including medical, dental, mental health, addiction treatment, and culturally based services.  Culture is a critical and integral part of everything they do.

Interview

We had a conversation with Yolanda Moisa, most current director of the newest clinic run by NARA and the BCCP Director (Breast and Cervical Cancer Program), to learn about NARA’s women’s health program.

PWM: Can you tell me about your organization’s mission?

YM: Our mission at NARA is to provide education, physical and mental health services and substance abuse treatment that is culturally appropriate to American Indians, Alaska Natives and anyone in need. Our purpose is to achieve the highest level of physical, mental and spiritual well being for American Indians and Alaska Native people.

Our women’s health program is a critical part of our larger physical health outreach.  It’s the women who make this program so rewarding.  Throughout the 20 years of this program, we have helped women from all backgrounds. Each person is unique and has a story to tell. We save lives daily.  Our hope and goal is prevention and no cases of cancer ever, however, the reality is that catching cancer sooner than later makes for a much better prognosis.

PWM: Can you tell us about some of your more rewarding moments?

YM: There are so many stories of success and how we help women, we are helping generations of women.  A story that comes to mind is that we had a woman who had just moved to the Portland area and came in for another visit and our staff noticed she was due for her yearly women’s exams.  When she received her results from her mammogram a small lump in her breast was detected. She did find out that it was cancerous, it was caught at Stage 1.  We walked her through her options and our team was there to answer all her questions.  Just having someone listen to her and help manage the many appointments that come with cancer treatment was a comfort.  More importantly, she brought her daughter in and sisters in to be tested, again changing lives.

PWM: When did NARA form and how many people have you served?

NARA has been in the community since 1970, and offering medical care since 1993. Since 1996 we have helped Women receive 5,160 MAMS and 6,391 PAPS.  We have two clinics, one at North Morris Street and our new Wellness Center on East Burnside. The women’s health program is housed in our clinic at 12360 E Burnside, Portland, OR 97233. The program offers women’s services at both clinics where screenings, and references for mammograms to low income, uninsured Native women. We want to provide early detection for breast and cervical cancer. As an urban facility, we’ve been able to serve members from over 250 tribes, nations, bands, who are all able to access any of the services here.

PWM: That’s fantastic. What drew you to this program, Yolanda?

YM: I came to NARA after many years in the corporate legal field. I’m a member of the Tule River Tribe in Porterville CA, and it was always my intention to return to working with Native Americans–to give back. Throughout my career I have volunteered and advocated for women and children.  Coming to NARA was like finding a family that truly “got it”, understanding what it means to help our community.  I see my family in the many faces in our waiting rooms: my grandmother, aunties, uncles, mother and siblings. I came in as a grants manager and was here for almost two years. I became clinic director  two years ago, and was pleased when we received a HRSA grant that helped set up the pharmacy and pediatric program at the site. I’ve been here close to five years and have continued to appreciate all that NARA does. It’s pretty amazing!

PWM: Are there special challenges within the Native American community?

YM: For Native women, there is a history of trauma around medical services. Along with assault, abuse and harassment, there is a documented history of forced sterilization. This painful history plays into fear and mistrust of medicine.

Our CDC (Center for Disease and Control)  grant  allows us to do something special for Native American and Alaska Native women—weekend clinic sessions that we call the Well Women’s Event. These events are designed as a safe place for women.  It’s not uncommon to have generations of women from families come together. The grandmother, mother and daughter will all come for the daughter’s first mammogram for support.  We open the clinic to women only. Our guests are welcomed to a Native crafts night, and a women-only talking circle. The nurse on staff gives one-on-one advice and education.  We offer cervical cancer screens here, and transport woman safely to and from an off-site mammogram facility.

Any woman who gets a screening receives culturally specific books about women’s health, including  “Journey Woman: A Native Woman’s Guide to Wellness”. Through the generosity of Pendleton we were allowed to use  Pendleton art forms in the books.

Books on Native Women's Wellness featuring Pendleton patterns.

When women see themselves in health materials, it builds trust and adds warmth to what can be a very cold environment. Some women come just for the community events, and that’s fine. Our goal is to make women’s healthcare safe and communal, almost a celebration of womanhood.

PWM: How does the Pendleton blanket help?

YM: Each purchase of the blanket generates a donation to NARA. The money will go into the women’s health program, helping us expand our outreach to various underserved and marginalized communities within Portland.  We hope to start momentum that leads to continuing healthcare. If we can save one life, we’re proud.  Hopefully with these added donations we will continue to help many more women.  Thank you Pendleton!

A flat shot of the special cherry pink Chief Joseph blanket that benefits NARA's women's wellness programs

If you would like to help NARA through direct donation, feel free to contact Yolanda Moisa at ymoisa@naranorthwest.org

If you would like to help through the purchase of the special edition Chief Joseph blanket, see it HERE: Chief Joseph.