Gifts of Honor for Public Servants

Madeline Albright onstage at Portland's Arlene Schnitzer Center for the Performing arts, receiving a Pendleton Brave Star blanket

Pendleton’s Brave Star blanket was presented to Madeleine Albright on Tuesday, September 10, 2019, when Madame Secretary kicked off the Hatfield Lecture Series for the Oregon Historical Society. She spoke to a sold-out crowd at the Arlene Schnitzer Auditorium in Portland, Oregon.

Pendleton Brave Star wool blanket in red white and blue

BRAVE STAR

This contemporary interpretation of the American flag is a celebration of the patriotism of Native Americans. In 1875 Indian scouts carried messages from fort to fort in the West. Native American soldiers saw action with Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders in Cuba. And soldiers from many tribes battled in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf and Iraq. Five Native Americans have been awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery “above and beyond the call of duty.” The design marries modern asymmetry and vintage Americana. The unique striations, using pulled out yarns, reflect an era when dyes were made from plants.

See it here: Brave Star Blanket

Former Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski received “The Few, the Proud” Marine Corps blanket at the Madeleine Albright dinner at Oregon Historical Society from State Senators Betsy Johnson and Elizabeth Steiner Hayward.

Former Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski receiving a Pendleton Marines blanket at the Oregon Historical Society

This blanket features the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps, woven in a wool blanket to honor the valor and loyalty of the Marines.

Pendleton Marines blanket feaaturing the logo of the USMC, red white and blue

The Few, The Proud

The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. Each element signifies the Marine Corps mission and legacy. The anchor reflects the naval tradition of the Marines as part of the Department of the Navy. The globe represents readiness to serve in any part of the world. The bald eagle, symbol of America, holds a ribbon in its beak that reads “Semper Fidelis,” or “Always Faithful,” a reference to the unending valor and loyalty of the Corps. Dyed, woven and hand-finished in America for quality that’s second to none.

See it here: Marines blanket

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Supporting Fisher House in honor of Veterans Day

In honor of Veterans Day: purchase one of three special blankets honoring veterans and we’ll donate 10% to the Fisher House Foundation to help military families. You can learn more about this non-profit’s important mission here: https://www.fisherhouse.org

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Here are the blankets that will help support this important mission–and remember, the Grateful Nation blanket generates donations year-round.

Grateful Nation

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The fabric of our nation is woven with the sacrifices of our veterans. This USA-made wool blanket honors the selfless service of these brave men and women. Centered on the blanket is a representation of the American flag. Each stripe represents a service ribbon awarded to veterans of historical conflicts from World War II on, and stars represent the 50 states, District of Columbia and five US territories. A portion of all sales of this blanket will be donated to the Fisher House™ Foundation, a nonprofit organization providing residences for the families of ill or wounded service members.

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Brave Star

Brave Star

This contemporary interpretation of the American flag is a celebration of the patriotism of Native Americans. In 1875 Indian scouts carried messages from fort to fort in the West. Native American soldiers saw action with Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders in Cuba. And soldiers from many tribes battled in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf and Iraq. Five Native Americans have been awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery “above and beyond the call of duty.” The design marries modern asymmetry and vintage Americana. The unique striations, using pulled out yarns, reflect an era when dyes were made from plants.

Mountain Majesty

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Inspired by Navajo hand weaving created in the Southwest in the early 20th century, this pattern incorporates symbols of hope, abundance and successful journeys. Muted colors and mountain-like steps evoke sunset over a western landscape.

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See all three the blankets here: http://bit.ly/2T1sNVu

Read more about our work with Fisher House here: FISHER HOUSE

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Patriotic Blankets for July 4th

We have woven many blankets that celebrate American patriotism over the years, from the Grateful Nation and Code Talker blankets that celebrate the contributions of our veterans, to retired blankets like Chief Eagle and Home of the Brave.

Here are two beautiful blankets that summon the patriotic spirit of this Independence Day.

Dawn’s Early Light:

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“O say can you see by the dawn’s early light.” These words were penned on the back of an envelope in 1814 by young lawyer and poet Francis Scott Key. Key was held captive on a Royal Navy ship as British ships in Chesapeake Bay bombarded Fort McHenry throughout the night. When dawn broke, the fort was still standing, the American flag still waving. It was a turning point in the war of 1812, and the birth of our national anthem, the “Star Spangled Banner.” This blanket, woven in our American mills, commemorates the Bicentennial of that momentous morning in U.S. history. Fifteen red and white stripes and stars represent those on the flag at that time. Each star is shaped like an aerial view of the fort, which was built in the shape of a five-pointed star. Striations and imprecise images give the design a vintage Americana look.

Brave Star:

Brave_StarThis contemporary interpretation of the American flag is a celebration of the patriotism of Native Americans. In 1875 Indian Scouts carried messages from fort to fort in the West. Native American soldiers saw action with Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders in Cuba. And soldiers from many tribes battled in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf and Iraq. Five Native Americans have been awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery “above and beyond the call of duty.” The design marries modern asymmetry and vintage Americana. The unique striations, using pulled out yarns, reflect an era when dyes were made from plants.

Have a great Fourth!

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