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STAR WARS: Rogue One Instagram Contest On The Way!

We are celebrating the release of Star Wars: Rogue One with a blanket giveaway on Instagram. It begins Thursday, December 15 at Noon (12 pm) Pacific Standard Time, and runs until Midnight on Sunday night–also Pacific Standard Time.

To enter, follow us on Instagram if you don’t already! If you are already a follower, you’ve met the first requirement without even trying.

Next, find our Instagram post of this image:

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In a comment on this exact post, leave a comment tagging at least one of your friends who are also on Instagram. Remember, tag your friends on Instagram, not this blog.

That’s it! You’ll be entered. You don’t even have to mention how intriguing the blanket is, or how excited you are to see Star Wars: Rogue One (though, like us, you probably can’t wait). Just an Instagram handle will do the job.

Winner will be chosen randomly on Monday, December 19th, with notification soon after.

The Star Wars: Rogue One blanket is BEAUTIFUL! Here’s a flat shot:

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Dark silhouettes hint at the mysterious heroes at the heart of Rogue One, the latest chapter of the Star Wars saga. This limited edition Pendleton blanket gives you a sneak peek at new characters Jyn Erso and Captain Cassian Andor, as well as the droid K-2SO, the tropical planet of Scarif–and is that Darth Vader and the Death Star in the distance?

Bands of green reflect the film’s muted palette, while geometric shapes add a distinctive finishing touch. The intricate and reversible design is made possible by Pendleton’s state-of-the-art looms and weaving expertise. Exclusive Pendleton design. Hand-numbered edition of 1,977 with a custom Star Wars label and Certificate of Authenticity.

 

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Isabelle Huppert in Pendleton for the New York Times

isabelle-huppert-slide-h1z7-superjumboWe were delighted to see French actress Isabelle Huppert in the New York Times style magazine, wearing our Frankie shirt. Huppert is known for her intelligence, beauty and insistence on challenging roles. Her career spans 45 years and over 100 roles.

You can read more about her controversial new movie with provocative director Paul Verhoeven here: NYT Interview with Isabelle Huppert

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And see the shirt here (Huppert is wearing the Black Watch): Frankie Shirt by Pendleton

Greg Hatten visits Badlands National Park

img_4280Ed. note: Our friend Greg Hatten took a small detour to Badlands on his way home from Oregon this year. And since our #pendle10park explorer has shown us so many photos of spires and stacks, we thought we’d share Greg’s beautiful prairie shots, as the prairie is a huge part of this beautiful South Dakota park. Enjoy!

In the Badlands National Park, there is a Wilderness Area where bison, coyotes, prairie dogs, and snakes make their homes. You can be a guest there and share this space with them – at least for a night or two.

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Look closely; there be prairie dogs in this photo.

img_4291We love the bison here, but we also love the national park stickers on Greg’s windshield. These were an enticement to the early motorists traveling from park to park. Like this (this is not Greg, though):

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Now, back to Greg’s story in the present day.

It’s the primitive camping area at Sage Creek in the North Unit of the park and if you take the rutted dusty “rim road” on the north side of the Badlands park you will find it – tucked between the gentle bluffs and rolling hills of buffalo grass in South Dakota – just southeast of Rapid City and the Black Hills.

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As I pulled into the area, it was a warm day for October and the only signs of life were a couple of bison calmly grazing who didn’t even look up as I rolled by in my FJ Cruiser pulling my little wooden boat. A ring-necked rooster pheasant was quite a bit more shy but still curious about the sound of loose gravel crunching beneath the tires. My window was down and I took a quick photo just before he put his head down and disappeared in the tall grass.

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While there are no rivers to “float” in the Badlands, I was towing my boat through the park on my way to the midwest for a little off-season repair work. I’m so used to camping next to the boat on the river, it somehow seemed to “fit” in this rustic setting. If nothing else, I figured it would be a nice wind break for my campsite. I picked a level spot for the tent that was in-between buffalo “pies” that were stale and crusty and no longer smelled. The canvas tent blended with the terrain and when camp was “set”, I pulled out my lap-top and did some late afternoon writing as the sun set and the temperatures started dropping.

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Greg’s post has a lot of beautiful photos and much more story. Read the rest here: Find Your Park in a Wooden Boat: Badlands

See Pendleton’s Badlands National Park items here: SHOP BADLANDS

 

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Volunteer Profile: Paul Ogren for the Badlands National Park

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Ed. Note: Our Badlands volunteer was nominated by Katie Johnston, Executive Director for Badlands Natural History Association. She wrote a charming letter to us about Paul Ogren, who works at the park’s front desk and in a variety of park programs. Katie’s words follow.

Dear Pendleton,

When you inquired about notable volunteers, an instant smile came across my face as I thought of Paul Ogren, a volunteer we have here at Badlands NP.

I grew up in the Badlands. My grandmother was in my current position here at the Association for 40 years previous to me. I came to work with her often, and grew up seeing the park rangers and seasonal employees that have been through this park for the past 30 years. I have gained so many friendships because of this park. One that hits near the top of my list is Paul.

As the non-profit partner to the park, we are responsible for helping with the volunteer program. When Paul arrives every spring, we say “We know our busy season is soon upon us when Paul arrives.” I can’t venture to guess how much time at the front desk or program time in the park Paul has put in the eight years he has been coming back, but it’s so much more than his volunteer time that Paul brings to our park. He brings us laughter, stories, knowledge, and the feeling of how much love someone can have for one place to keep returning to it year after year. In a park where every season has different employees, it’s nice to see some consistency.

Whether it be answering the common question, “What is that black and white bird outside with the long tail?” or “Where can we find the bison?” Paul is prepared to help in any way that he can, and the best part is, he is happy to do it.

I know that there will come a day where Paul won’t be back for the summer, and a great number of us will be very sad. However, he doesn’t see that happening anytime soon. He is planning to return this spring, and for that, the Badlands can be grateful.

Thank you for the opportunity to share my thoughts on such a valuable person to Badlands National Park. He doesn’t volunteer for the fame, and sure as heck not for the money. It is for the love of a location and the people he works with.  I believe that volunteers across the park service deserve more credit than they get. ..but you won’t hear that from them either!

Best Regards,

Katie Johnston
Executive Director
Badlands Natural History Assoc.

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Emmanuel_Beltran_NP_Badlands_Home_Acc-(25).jpgPhoto of Paul Ogren courtesy Badlands National Park (NPS Photo)

Additional photos by #pendle10park explorer Emmanuel Beltran

Badlands National Park, our Last #pendle10park for 2016

IMG_6726It’s been an incredible year for Pendleton and our parks, as we help celebrate the centennial of the National Park Service. Our #pendle10park explorers have taken you from California to Maine. We are going to finish out the year with Badlands National Park.

South Dakota’s Badlands were authorized as a National Monument in 1929, officially established in 1939 and designated as a National Park on November 10, 1978. Badlands National Park is home to haunting natural beauty and some of the richest fossil beds in North America.

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The name “Badlands” comes from the Lakota, who moved into the western plains during the late 18th century. They called the area Mako Sica, which translates as “eroded land” or “bad land.” As they traveled and hunted, the Lakota found the White River Badlands fossil beds and correctly surmised that the area had been underwater. They believed the skeletons belonged to a great sea beast called Unktegila. The ghost dances of the Lakota, led by the visionary Wovoka, were held in the remote tablelands of the Badlands.

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History echoes in the spires and peaks of the eroded rock formations, across the prairies, and in the secluded valleys where Native American tribes have been hunting and living for 11,000 years.

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Settlers and homesteaders arrived in the 20th century, but struggled to find a foothold in such arid conditions. The Dust Bowl wiped out most of the area’s farming, and plagues of grasshoppers took care of the rest. Abandoned sod houses dotted the area until the wind and weather took them down. Today, the area supports wheat farming.

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Badlands National Park is a designated wilderness preserve. Here, you can experience the largest protected mixed-grasses prairie in the US. You can see mule deer, antelope, bighorn sheep and coyotes. Look a little closer to the ground, and you will see black-tailed prairie dogs. You might even catch a glimpse of the black-footed ferret, the most endangered land mammal in North America. And of course, you’ll see the American Land Bison, or buffalo.

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The Badlands are an “avian crossroad,” a habitat for both eastern and western birds. The cliffs make excellent hunting grounds for golden eagles and prairie falcons. Cliff swallows and rock pigeons nest in the countless hollows. It is a birder’s paradise, but explore this park with caution; the country is hard to travel, with sharp rocks, yielding substrate, and very little water.

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Sunset here is particularly beautiful. Enjoy it among the formations, as the setting sun catches the pinnacles, casting dramatic shadows.

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Or settle onto the prairie, and enjoy the sounds of South Dakota; the wind in the grass and the evening birdsong.

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Photography by Emmanuel Beltran: @stick_e

Shop Pendleton Badlands National Park: SHOP

Gifts that Give Back: The American Indian College Fund Blankets

2016_fall1_blankets_throws_aicfToday is #GivingTuesday. Each year, as you plan your holiday shopping, please remember gifts that give back. Since 1990, Pendleton Woolen Mills has been proud to support the work of the American Indian College Fund. Sales of these blankets fund scholarships to tribal colleges, and make a difference in the lives of students throughout the country.

We have already featured this year’s blanket, the Naskan, so we’re showing you some others. Go see them all here: The College Fund Blankets

Nike N7

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Innovation meets tradition with this collaboration between Nike N7 and Pendleton Woolen Mills. For inspiration, Nike designer Derek Roberts (the design genius behind our popular Star Wars blankets) looked to traditional Native American dress and how the patterns work together to create a garment.

Return of the Sun

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This graphic design was created in partnership with Native American artist Larry Ahvakana. The changing of the seasons plays a central role in many Iñupiat traditions and activities, and in Mr. Ahvakana’s sculpture work. This blanket celebrates the arrival of the sun back to the Arctic and the start of hunting season.

Raven and the Box of Knowledge

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Internationally renowned glass artist Preston Singletary grew up in the Pacific Northwest. His works explore traditional images and legends of his Tlingit heritage translated into glass. The image on this blanket represents Raven, a shape shifter and trickster who often employed crafty schemes to achieve his goals

Earth Blanket

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Inspired by a blanket in an Edward S. Curtis photograph, the Earth Blanket embodies the elements of earth and sky, with a grey triangular step pattern in the center called the mountain design. Each cross represents the four directions.

Water Blanket

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Also inspired by an early 20th-century photograph by Edward S. Curtis, this blanket is inspired by the peerless weaving of the American Southwest. It incorporates classic Navajo elements in an eye-dazzling pattern. The central dragonfly, an emblem of water, symbolizes life.

We’ve shown you only four of these beautiful blankets. See the other choices, including saddle blankets and two children’s sized blankets, at our website: The College Fund Blankets

Learn more about the work of the College Fund here:   www.collegefund.org

Top 10 Pendleton Picks for BLACK FRIDAY

black-friday-pendleton-giftsBlack Friday can be overwhelming—it’s a mad rush to stock up on gifts and fight the crowds before you collapse at home for leftovers and napping. To make things a little easier, here are top 10 picks to grab this Black Friday, from hot new arrivals to time-tested bestsellers. Click the name to shop these items at pendleton-usa.com – and check out our amazing Black Friday deals!

  1. Marvel Captain America Blanket

Chances are, you know a Marvel fan, and our newest blanket is the one they want. (Prefer Star Wars? You’re all set too.) This wool blanket is naturally warm and resists stains and odors, plus it’s made in America. Steve Rogers would approve.

  1. Washable Whisperwool® Robe

This is the bathrobe they’ll love for the rest of their lives. If you think that’s an exaggeration, customer Patricia51 writes, “This robe is so wonderful, warm, cuddly, and well made. I truly will never need to buy another, ever.” Pendleton’s exclusive Whisperwool pure virgin wool is not only supersoft, light and warm; it’s also machine washable, so crumbs and spills are nothing to worry about.

  1. Women’s Lounge Hoodie

Technically this is “loungewear,” but several Pendleton employees wear this at the office. and it’s so cozy (plus there’s an eye-catching Pendleton pattern on the back and sleeves). It’s basically a hoodie you can wear to work. Genius!

  1. Sir Pendleton Wool Shirt

If “wool shirt” makes you think “thick and scratchy,” this shirt will change your mind. It’s refined and lightweight, woven of an entire mile of smooth worsted merino wool yarn. One happy customer says he owns a dozen of them!

  1. Merino Wool Socks

Can anything beat merino wool socks? They keep your feet happy and dry, they never get terribly smelly and they’re light and breathable enough to wear all year. Try this new knee-high version in our popular Harding pattern, or go with unisex patterned crew socks to make workdays more lively. Can’t get enough? There’s more here, here and here.

  1. Eco-Wise Wool Blanket

If “machine washable” seems to be an unofficial theme, it continues with our Eco-Wise Wool® blankets. (Who has time for dry cleaning, especially during the holidays?) In both solids and plaids, they’re some of Pendleton’s bestsellers: made in America, softer with every wash and Cradle to Cradle certified eco-friendly. You can even get them monogrammed.

  1. Sierra Coat

Wish you (or she) could wear a Pendleton blanket? Now you can. Our warm, blanket-weight fabric also goes into this luxurious, popular jacket in versatile black and ivory.

  1. The Original Westerley

As seen in the cult classic movie The Big Lebowski, this is Pendleton’s bestselling men’s sweater, also beloved by women and dogs. Even if you aren’t a fan of The Dude, the unusual, distinctive design is stylish enough on its own. It’s well-constructed of toasty lambswool and sure to be a cold-weather favorite. Get one before it sells out again!

  1. Glacier Fifth Avenue Throw

Pendleton’s softest, most luxurious throw blanket in an incredibly popular pattern. This is the one they’ll love wrapping up in on cold nights or snuggling under on the couch. The fine merino wool is brushed for a cozy feel, and the simple bands of color match almost anything.

  1. Board Shirt

Our #1 Heritage product. Guys love it. Women do too (and there’s finally one for them!). This must-have has been seen everywhere from a Beach Boys album cover to rockstars, celebrities, outdoor enthusiasts and anyone who likes to be warm and stylish. For the uninitiated, Pendleton’s rugged Umatilla wool is breathable and resists stains, wrinkles, odors and even rain, and the colors will stay true. Plus, it’ll last for decades. Perfect gift!

What will you be buying this Black Friday (if anything)? Happy shopping!

Code Talkers: Native Heroes, Never Forgotten

As part of native American History Month, we’d like to look back at a favorite blanket, Code Talkers (retired in 2012), which honors the exceptional valor and service of Navajo Code Talkers during WWII.

The Code Talkers developed a code that could not be cracked, based on the Navajo language. The (now retired) design shows the Navajo words and their coded meanings, which remained impenetrable to German code-breakers throughout the war.

The history of the code talkers  is more riveting than any film or any fiction.  You can learn more at their official site, and  at other sites that tell this fascinating story, which was told in the popular movie “Windtalkers”.

They don’t have a Pendleton blanket, but the Choctaw Code Talkers of WWI   deserve recognition for their role. This small group of Choctaw soldiers conveyed crucial information over tapped phone lines.  You can read more about them here, and see a full list of their names.

It is worth noting that these Native American soldiers fought for the USA before they were even granted official citizenship in 1924. In the year 2008, the United Sates Senate and House of Representatives passed legislation to recognize Code Talkers from several nations: Navajo, Choctaw, Comanche and more.

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As the years march on, there are fewer Code Talkers to honor, but these heroes will not be forgotten. Though Code talkers is no longer available, the Brave Star blanket celebrates the patriotism and military service of Native Americans.

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This contemporary interpretation of the American flag is a celebration of the patriotism of Native Americans. In 1875 Indian scouts carried messages from fort to fort in the West. Native American soldiers saw action with Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders in Cuba. And soldiers from many tribes battled in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf and Iraq. Five Native Americans have been awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery “above and beyond the call of duty.” The design marries modern asymmetry and vintage Americana. The unique striations, using pulled out yarns, reflect an era when dyes were made from plants.

To learn more about the role of Native Americans in America’s defense over two centuries, click here: Native Americans and the US Military

 

Adopt a Native Elder fundraiser: 100% of proceeds going to benefit a Navajo weaver

Editor’s note: It’s Native American History Month. The Navajo /Dine elders are part of a living history; keeping alive the traditional ways of living, weaving, and producing food. We are offering a handwoven 100% Pendleton wool rug at auction to benefit the Adopt a Native Elder program. Please read more, and visit the auction. Thank you!

pwm_10_2016_-837_webThis authentic Navajo rug is being offered by Pendleton Woolen Mills in support of Utah’s Adopt-a-Native-Elder program. This outreach program helps Navajo elders, as they carry on the oldest cultural and spiritual traditions of the Dine People. Many elders are located in remote areas, living in hogans and raising sheep. The program provides food, clothing, fabrics, yarns and other needs. In return, the Elders share their expertise, especially in weaving.

For this project, Pendleton donated bales of dyed virgin wool, which ANE volunteers divided into bags and distributed after an Adopt-a-Native-Elder dinner. The Grandmothers were invited to choose their own wool, and were quite enthusiastic to be involved.

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The weavers returned fifteen completed rugs for judging. From a host of beautiful entries, this rug was the winner.

It was woven by Gloria Hardy with assistance from her mother, Louise. It is spun and woven from 100% Pendleton wool. Mother Louise spun the wool, and daughter Gloria designed the pattern and did the weaving. The size is impressive (48″ x 46″), and it is a beautiful pattern.

See the rug here: Hand-woven Navajo Rug

The stripes in the pattern represent the calm and steady wind of the desert sky. The crosses represent the Prayer of the Four Directions:  I pray with beauty before me, behind me, above me and all around me. May I walk in beauty.

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This rug is one-of-a-kind, authentically Navajo, and is being offered to support the fine work of Adopt-a-Native-Elder. Pendleton is proud to support Adopt-a-Native-Elder.

More information on Adopt a Native Elder can be found here: http://www.anelder.org/

See the rug and bid on it here: Navajo handwoven wool rug

Native American History Month: Revisit “Canyon Song”

53_CACH_BTS_20160329.jpgPendleton Woolen Mills is proud to be part of the National Park Experience series with a new short film, “Canyon Song.”

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Canyon Song follows the Draper family as they practice traditional indigenous farming methods in the Canyon de Chelly Wilderness.

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As a portrait of two young Dine girls, Tonisha and Tonielle Draper, “Canyon Song” artfully positions the historic with the modern. The girls sing songs about social media (you should watch the closing credits to enjoy this) and visit the carnival. Tonisha participates in competitions that showcase understanding and reverence for Navajo culture.

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These girls are the heart of the film, and their smiles, voices and joy will haunt you.

Canyon de Chelly sits in the heart of the Navajo nation. Spider Rock, with spires that tower 800 feet above the canyon floor, is one of the canyon’s most important landmarks. 

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Spider Woman, one of the major Navajo deities, is traditionally said to live at the top of Spider Rock.  In our research, we came across this description of her from an older book of legends:

The people gazed wide-eyed upon her shining beauty. Her woven upper garment of soft white wool hung tunic-wise over a blue skirt. On its left side was woven a band bearing the Butterfly and Squash Blossom, in designs of red and yellow and green with bands of black appearing in between. Her neck was hung with heavy necklaces of turquoise, shell and coral, and pendants of the same hung from her ears. Her face was fair, with warm eyes and tender lips, and her form most graceful. Upon her feet were skin boots of gleaming white, and they now turned toward where the sand spun about in whirlpool fashion. She held up her right hand and smiled upon them, then stepped upon the whirling sand. Wonder of wonders, before their eyes the sands seemed to suck her swiftly down until she disappeared entirely from their sight. (source)

Spider Woman is the original weaver, who wove the web of the Universe. She also played a key role in Earth’s creation as Tawa, the Sun God, sang the world into existence. Spider Woman made a gift of her weaving skills to her people as part of the “Beauty Way,” a Navajo tradition of balance in mind, body and spirit. She also has a fierce aspect. Parents would threaten their children with her wrath:

As children growing up at Spider Rock, Canyon De Chelly and Canyon Del Muerto, our grandmother would tell us of mischievous and disobedient children that were taken to Spider Woman and woven up in her tight weaving, after Talking God had spoken through the wind spirits to instruct Spider Woman on how to find and identify the bad little kids. Spider Woman would boil and eat the bad little kids, that is why there are white banded streaks at the top of Spider Rock, where the bones of the bad children still bleach the rocks to this day. (source)

Now, if that isn’t enough to make you behave…

It is a privilege to be part of a film that celebrates this harsh and beautiful country, and the people who live there. Please enjoy “Canyon Song.”

Photos courtesy of The National Park Experience.

See Pendleton’s Spider Rock pattern here: Spider Rock