Skip to content

Blanket Sizes 101: which to choose?

When it comes to blanket sizes, we’re all familiar with twin, queen and king. But what about throws, robes and muchachos? Whether you need a blanket for sleeping, picnicking, camping or as a decorative accent, we’ve got hundreds of options. To find your perfect Pendleton blanket, use this handy glossary:

Throws

MarinaChavez-SuzanneSantos_Throw_2017-(1)

Photography by Marina Chavez,  styling by Suzanne Santo

Smaller than a full-size blanket, and perfect for reading, watching TV or napping. Keep one draped over a chair or on your bed for easy access—and to add lovely color to your décor. Available in merino wool, wool bouclé, cotton and more; sizes range from 54″ x 60″ to 54″ x 72″.

Motor Robes

Kathleen_Peachey_05_2017_Home_Acc_Sp17-(3)

Photography by Kathleen Peachey

In the early 20th century, before automobiles had heaters, these travel-size wool blankets kept passengers warm. Today, our Motor Robes are perfect for summer picnics, crisp autumn football games or just curling up with at home. As a bonus, each one includes a leather carrier. 54″ x 66″.

Roll-Up Blankets

Glacier Road To The Sun1

Photography by Colleen Grant

Our Roll-Up Blankets have weather-resistant backings, so they’re just right for lounging on the lawn, outdoor concerts or sleeping under the stars. Each comes with a sling-over-your shoulder carrying handle, too. Choose stripes, plaids, tartans or National Park motifs. 60″ x 30″.

Crib and Muchacho Blankets

Grace_Adams_2016_02_Home_LittleOnes-(17)

Photography by Grace Adams

Classic Pendleton blankets, sized for kids! These mini blankets are perfect for afternoon naps, stroller rides and fort building. Muchacho Blankets also make delightful wall hangings (details below). Choose traditional wool (32″ x 44″) or cotton (30″ x 40″).

Saddle Blankets

Shondina_Yikasbaa_04_10_WW_Home_Acc_F16-(2)

Photography and styling by Shondina Lee Yikasbaa

Long and narrow, our wool Saddle Blankets are perfect for benches, seats or lounge chairs. 68″ x 39″. 

Bed Blankets:

HS17_02Aa_72537

Twin/Robe

This blanket size is perfect for keeping folded up at the end of your bed as a colorful accent (and for easy naptime access!). Or, proudly display it as a wall hanging (details below). Fits a traditional twin; 64″ x 80-84″. For X-long twin, choose our Eco-Wise Wool Blanket, measuring 66″ x 96″.

Queen

Fits full and queen beds. 90″ x 96″.

King

Fits standard king and California king beds. 108″ x 90″.

Wall Hangings

We will gladly sew tabs on any blanket sizes so that you may use it as a wall hanging. Tab color will match the blanket binding. For complete details, please call customer service at 1-800-649-1512.

PWM_USA_label

A traditional Chilkat robe in Pendleton wool

On Earth Day, we published a beautiful photo of Linda Benson Kusumoto in her traditional Chilkat robe standing in front of the Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska.

image2abc

To us, it captured the spirit of celebrating the Earth. Linda’s robe is made entirely of Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool, and was handmade by her. She was gracious enough to give us some information on it, as well as some photos of it at celebrations. Along with her Chilkat robe, she sent photos of her family wearing traditional button blankets, also made by Linda with Pendleton wool.

image1

Here is some background, courtesy of Linda.

My name is Linda Benson Kusumoto. I am a Tsimshian Native, from Metlakatla, Alaska. I lived part of my life in Portland, Oregon, where I found your wool and studied our traditional arts. Benson is my maiden name and is a Tsimshian family name.  When our tribe moved to Alaska, transitioned by Father Duncan (a missionary from England), the individuals were given English names.  My grandparents were given the name of Benson.

image2

 

Chilkat robe – I believe that this started with the Tsimshian (my tribe). Our tribe originated from British Columbia long the Nash River, Father Duncan moved half of our tribe to Metlakatla, Alaska.  It is said that the Tsimshian were once of the Nisgaa tribe.  I belong to both tribes as a registered tribal member, my primary tribe is the Tsimshian Nation of Metlakatla, Alaska. Our cities are Old Metlakatla, British Columbia and Metlakatla, Alaska on Annette Island (sometimes referred to as New Metlakatla). My father and grandparents were born and raised on Annette Island, Metlakatla, Alaska.  I was born in Seattle, Washington. With me in the photos are my daughter, Kelli  Jean Coy; my sister, Valerie Benson Callahan; and my first cousin, Coral Sumner Lehtinen.

Rowfromback

Traditional Alaska Native Button Blanket – These are made in traditional colors of red & black, and sometimes in royal blue and/or ivory.  These are designed, created and worn by the Tsimshian, Haida, and the Tlingit tribes of Alaska, especially for Celebration, held every other year in Juneau, Alaska.

Celebration – The button blankets and Chilkat robe shown in these photos have all been worn during Celebration, multiple years and for traditional potlatch ceremonies in Alaska. Here are some images of 2016 Celebration.

image3

This is a photo of me wearing my full regalia for Celebration 2016.  I also made leggings to match using Pendleton wool.  And I am wearing our traditional red cedar bark hat.

LindaKusumoto

Here is a button blanket that I made over 15 years ago and it still looks the same today.  This photo was featured in the “Winds of Change” magazine when I won the Executive Excellence Professional award 2012 from the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (www.aises.org).

older-Button-Blanket

All photos Linda Benson Kusumoto, used with permission

Thank you so much, Linda, for sharing your traditions and robes with us. For anyone wondering where to buy Pendleton wool by the yard, here are two sources.

Pendleton Woolen Mill Store in Milwaukie, Oregon: You can stop by the store and see all the fabric offerings and special cuts in person! Or, you can peruse fabrics on the store’s blog and order over the phone. The store does ship internationally.

Woolen Mill Store Blog: Shop Fabrics

Woolen  Mill Store Facebook (for store location, hours and phone number)

A wide selection of fabric is also available at the Pendleton website here: SHOP FABRIC

The perfect gift? A Pendleton blanket.

It’s that time of year again. You’ve got a niece graduating from college, a friend who’s getting married, a housewarming and a baby shower in the mix. You need the perfect gift.

Forget slogging through online registries or defaulting to gift cards again. Sure, we’re a little biased, but Pendleton blankets are the ultimate gift: their quality shows and you don’t have to worry about fit. And, they’ll last a lifetime. But don’t take our word for it. Here are our customers’ top gifts picks:

Glacier National Park Blanket: You can’t go wrong with classic stripes. This 100-year-old design is a long-time favorite one fan calls the “perfect gift.”

Kristian_Irey_NP_Glacier_Home_Acc-(4)

Photo by Cassy Berry @cassyandrabee

 

Eco-Wise Blankets & Throws: Sustainably-made, machine washable wool. Perfect for college kids (twin fits extra-long dorm beds) or for anyone who loves quality but demands easy care. Starting at just $139 in 25+ colors and patterns.

EcoBeauty

Photo by Pendleton Woolen Mills

Motor Robe with Carrier: This wool blanket is at home on the couch or the beach. Made for travel with a convenient leather carrier, it looks more expensive than it is (just $99.50!).

Kathleen_Peachey_05_2017_Home_Acc_Sp17-(3)

Photo by Kathleen Peachey @kathleenpeachey

 

Chief Joseph Blanket: One of our all-time bestselling blankets and classic Pendleton. Choose from 12 colors and three sizes for a gift that’s just right.

HS17_11ACa_Chief_Joseph

 

Photo by Pendleton Woolen Mills

5th Avenue Throw: “Bought as a gift, but I wanted to keep it!” says a customer from New York. No surprise: It’s made from the softest, most luxurious merino wool you’ve ever felt.

MarinaChavez-SuzanneSantos_Throw_2017-(4)

Photo by Marina Chavez and Suzanne Santo, @soozanto of @honeyhoneyband

Yakima Camp Blanket: Pendleton quality starting at $99. Also available in Throw size. In versatile neutrals, so you won’t have to worry about matching their décor. “They were thrilled with the quality and craftsmanship,” says a shopper from California.

HS17_48ACa_camp_blankets

Photo by Pendleton Woolen Mills

Need more gift ideas?

Geneva_2017_03_Home_Sp17

Photo by Geneva, @cosmic.america

Check out our gifts under $50, gifts for kids or our best gifts ever. Monogramming starts at just $10 and makes it extra special!

PWM_USA_label

A New American Indian College Fund Blanket for 2017

Pendleton is proud to unveil our blanket for The College Fund for 2017, Gift of the Earth.

ze788-53422-aicf-gift-to-the-earth-f

For over 20 years, Wieden+Kennedy, the American Indian College Fund, and Pendleton Woolen Mills have worked together to create this amazing line of blankets as a way to raise money and promote the need for higher education in Native American communities. Our newest blanket, Gift of the Earth, was designed by Patty Orlando. A bold design on a neutral backdrop is inspired by the traditional Hopi pottery of Arizona. Today, Hopi potters draw from generations of knowledge to create their beautiful, unique works of art. This design pays testament to this practice of learning from the past while moving into the future.

Shondina_Lee_04_2017_AICFBlanket-(1).jpg

It joins a collection of blankets designed specifically for the American Indian College Fund, many of them designed by Native artists. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of College Fund blankets provides scholarships for Native students to attend tribal colleges and universities. The College Fund has been the nation’s largest philanthropic effort supporting Native American higher education for more than 25 years.

Shondina_Lee_04_2017_AICFBlanket-(2).jpg

Today, slightly more than 13% of American Indians age 25 and older have a college degree, less than half the U.S. national average. What’s more, 40% of the American Indian population is under the age of 18.  The College Fund is helping more American Indians of college age to start and complete their college degree through scholarship support.  The College Fund also provides program support for students once they are in school to help them succeed both academically and in their careers.

Shondina_Lee_04_2017_AICFBlanket-(7)

“Pendleton is proud to be a part of the American Indian College Fund’s mission, and its purpose to transform Indian higher education,” said Mort Bishop, Pendleton President.  “By creating an awareness of the unique, community-based accredited Tribal Colleges and Universities and offering students access to knowledge, skills and cultural values, the College Fund enhances their communities and the country as a whole.”

Shondina_Lee_04_2017_AICFBlanket-(6)

About the American Indian College Fund – Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for more than 25 years.  The College Fund has provided more than 100,000 scholarships since its inception and an average of 6,000 scholarships per year to American Indian students and a variety of programs to support their academic efforts ensuring they have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers.  The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators.  For more information, please visit www.collegefund.org.

To view the entire American Indian College Fund Collection, click here: The College Fund Blankets.

“Blessing Song” from the album Tribute to the Elders (CR-6318) by the Black Lodge Singers courtesy Canyon Records License 2017-023. All rights reserved.  www.CanyonRecords.com.

Photos courtesy of the always chic  Shondina Lee Yikasbaa

Shondina_Lee_04_2017_AICFBlanket-(4)

 

PWM_USA_label

May the Fourth Be With You: Win a Pendleton® Blanket on Instagram

StarWarsDay_01Thursday, May the Fourth is the fan-driven celebration of all things STAR WARS. Pendleton is doing our part with a STAR WARS blanket giveaway on Instagram. This giveaway will run on Thursday and Friday of this week only.

To enter:

Celebrate Star Wars on May the 4th with Pendleton.  To enter the blanket giveaway:

  1. Follow @pendletonwm on Instagram
  2. Tag 2 friends in the comment section below
  3. You’re entered, easy as that!

Contest ends on Friday, May 5th at midnight PST.  One winner will be announced on Monday May 8th.  Good luck!

StarWarsDay_03

Official rules below:

Read more

Jessica Enjoys Pendleton Athleisure Wear–on sale May 1st & 2nd

Pendleton leisure/sleep/lounge wear is on sale today and tomorrow;  use code RELAX at checkout at www.pendleton-usa.com.

To show you our athleisure in action, here is Jessica Lindsey of Edge Movement Arts, posing near the St. Johns Bridge in Portland, Oregon. Along with the beautiful photos, Jessica talks about her path and her approach to teaching yoga. 

Jessica_Lindsey_-(23)

I went through my initial yoga instructor certification and started teaching in 2008.  I had been practicing various forms yoga since 1999.  I initially started doing yoga after I tore my ACL in a dance performance and needed a gentle way to heal my body after I had surgery to repair it.  Yoga allowed me to slowly ease into finding movement and range of motion after months of limited mobility, muscle atrophy, and an abundance of scar tissue post-surgery.

Jessica_Lindsey_-(7)

It was a slow process and I thought I was just doing it for the physical benefits at the time, but after each session I would feel so grounded and calm, like all the troubles of life and the world where somehow less significant or important.  That is what really convinced me that yoga was something that I needed to have in my life long-term. Yoga changed me physically – longer, leaner, and more flexible use of my muscles, but it was the changes in how I experienced the world in a more joyful and positive way that feel the most significant now.

Jessica_Lindsey_-(6)

When I returned to my dance career I found that I had so much more awareness of what it meant to exist and be in my body, how to express with my body. As I went down the path of training to be a competitive ballroom dancer (or as we call it in the ballroom world, a “Dancesport Athlete”) I found yoga’s ability to create calm, centered energy helped to balance out the fire of being a competitive athlete.

Jessica_Lindsey_-(17)

Dance is my expressing outwardly to the world – doing part, yoga is  my receiving, letting go and simply being part!  Or to put it more simply…. Dance is Doing, Yoga is Being!

Jessica_Lindsey_-(12)

I draw from many different bodies of knowledge to influence what I offer to my students.  Sometimes a classic “yoga asana” or pose is in order, other times I draw from the Chinese energy meridian system, from fascial and kinesiological stretching techniques, and other times from my knowledge from years working in veterinary surgery and the biomechanics of mammalian injury and recovery.

Jessica_Lindsey_-(13)

 

Jessica_Lindsey_-(2)

I am a body knowledge geek.  I can spend hours researched the interconnected relationships of why stretching your foot will make your shoulder feel better, or why that tender spot on your thigh could mean that your liver is out of balance.  The body is this beautiful puzzle and each person’s life experiences have shaped every inch of the person I see standing before me in a group class or a private session.

Jessica_Lindsey_-(22)

I recognize that no two people are the same and that no single variation of a pose is going to work for everyone.  How could it? No one else has lived the life you have lived in the exact beautiful, crazy, messy way that you have.  I honor that, see that, and try to the best of my ability to create an environment and a practice that lets my students own their personal freedom to choose what is right for them.

Jessica_Lindsey_-(20)

The most important aspects of how I decided what to wear when doing yoga are in no particular order:

Do I look good in it? By that I mean that when I look in the mirror I feel it is flattering  and makes me feel good about myself.

Does it move well with me? there is nothing worse then a pair of yoga pants that feel like they are falling down or do not give me full range of motion. So really good stretch and cut are important.

Is the fabric comfortable and breathable and odor-resistant? Since I am physically active all day long in my professional life, it is so important that my clothing feels nice to exist in, and that it stays fresh all day long.

Jessica_Lindsey_-(24)

Great yoga clothing needs to be multipurpose. My favorite items are those that look good, feel good, and fit well not only during my practice, but when I greet new clients, and then go have a meal with friends.

Our men’s sleepwear and athleisure is available with the same discount: use the code RELAX at pendleton-usa.com.

Enjoy your week, and relax.

 

 

 

Types of wool explained: merino, lambswool, Shetland & more

types-of-wool-list-blog-postDo you know your types of wool? From Shetland to merino, it can vary widely. Earlier, we covered the differences between virgin and recycled wool. Today we’ll help you understand the main types of wool, including:

  • Merino wool
  • Lambswool
  • Shetland wool
  • Cashmere
  • Alpaca
  • Mohair

Quick note: Fibers are only wool if they come from sheep. So cashmere, alpaca and mohair (which come from goats and alpacas) are actually hair, not wool. Interesting, right? Now let’s get started!

Merino wool comes from Merino sheep, mostly found in Australia and New Zealand. Merino wool is finer (or thinner) than your average wool, which makes it softer, less itchy and more flexible. Our 5th avenue throw is a great example. It’s also cool, breathable and moisture-wicking, which is why merino makes for such a good base layer during hiking or exercise. Whether you’re hot or cold, merino wool keeps you comfortable—no wonder it’s so popular!

merino-wool-blanket-pendleton

Merino wool 5th avenue throw

Even within merino wool, there are several different categories. Not to get too technical, but the larger the diameter of the wool fiber, the coarser and more itchy it will be. Some wool fibers can be 25 microns in diameter or more, and your hair is 50-100 microns thick. In comparison, merino wool fibers are typically 24 microns in diameter or smaller. Fine merino is less than 19.5 microns, superfine is less than 18.5 and ultrafine merino is less than 15. For sweaters, socks, blankets and more, merino wool is an excellent (and premium) choice. Check out all Pendleton’s merino wool blankets here.

Lambswool is the finest, softest fleece that comes from a lamb’s first shearing, usually when the lamb is six or seven months old. It’s smooth, strong and flexible, plus it doesn’t need much processing. Lambswool is excellent for blankets and bedding (and allergy sufferers) because it’s hypoallergenic and resists dust mites. Like merino and all wool, lambswool is breathable and helps your body regulate temperature. Check out our plaid lambswool throw and see for yourself!

Shetland wool comes from Shetland sheep, originally found on Scotland’s Shetland Islands. Over 200 years ago, Sir John Sinclair praised Shetland wool as having “the gloss and softness of silk, the strength of cotton, the whiteness of linen, and the warmth of wool.” The fibers are 23 microns thick on average, making it generally thicker than merino. Shetland wool is known for being durable and hardy, as the climate on the northern island can get quite cold. That means Shetland wool is terrific for warm and toasty sweaters. If it’s too rough for your liking, layer it over a shirt.

sheep-photo-wool-blog-postCashmere comes from the fine undercoat of the cashmere (or Kashmir) goat and is known for being supersoft, delicate and luxurious. Most cashmere comes from goats in China and Mongolia. Fibers are about 18 microns in diameter, so about the same as superfine merino. It’s often expensive: Only about 25% of a cashmere goat’s fleece is used, so it takes the hair of two goats just to make one cashmere sweater. Some of Pendleton’s wool blankets, sweaters and coats contain cashmere to make the texture blissfully soft yet still warm and insulating—like this throw.

Alpaca hair is strong, silky, warm and durable…plus alpacas are cute! (They’re related to llamas.) Alpacas were originally bred in South America and especially prized in Inca culture in Peru’s Andes Mountains. Their hair is hypoallergenic, so if you’re allergic to wool, try alpaca. If not, alpaca and merino wool create a wonderfully soft and light yet insulating blend. Fibers are similarly sized as cashmere and fine merino. Several of our women’s sweaters and cardigans are made with alpaca yarn.

alpaca-wool-hairAlpacas grazing

Mohair is hair from the angora goat. It’s smoother than wool (and slightly more expensive) but not as soft as cashmere, so it’s kind of a middle ground. Fibers are 25-40 microns in diameter, roughly the same as Shetland wool and even some merino. Mohair is known to have a fuzzy texture, because the goat’s coarser outer hairs mix in with its fluffy undercoat. Like wool, it’s wrinkle- and dirt-resistant. Pendleton’s new boucle wool throw blends mohair with lambswool for warmth and unique texture.

Any other types of wool you’re curious about? Let us know in the comments below!

Pendleton is open in Eugene, Oregon!

We are excited about our new Pendleton store in Eugene, Oregon.

5thst

Here is our official first customer:

Parke-Eugene

It’s a beautiful space, filled with a curated selection of apparel for men and women, and of course a wide selection of our gorgeous made-in-the-USA Pendleton wool blankets.

IMG_7951

IMG_7949

We can’t wait to roll up this garage window when the weather gets brighter.

IMG_7948

Come see us at:

248 E 5th Avenue, Suite 14
Eugene, Oregon
541 344 1248

You can follow our store on Facebook here: Pendleton Eugene

Poets Laureate National Parks Tour

FullSizeRender (6)Ed. note: Today’s post is a special feature in honor of National Park Week. We have had the pleasure of working with Karla K. Morton and Alan Birkelbach, two Texas Poets Laureate who are currently on a Poets Laureate National Parks Tour.  Karla took the time to answer our questions, and even shared some poetry. Enjoy!

  1. What does it mean to be Poet Laureate?

Both Alan Birkelbach and I have the great honour of being named Texas Poets Laureate, a lifetime title.  Alan was named in 2005 and I was named in 2010. A Poet Laureate is the highest rank you can go in a state as a poet, and almost every state in the US has one.   Here in Texas, there is no pay, no set criteria, so we do what moves us.  This Poets Laureate National Parks Tour is truly what moves me and Alan.  We are poets of nature.  Our work holds a great sense of place.  And above all, we are passionate when it comes to preserving such beauty.

  1. How did you become Poets Laureate/Poet Laureates?

In Texas, there is a call for nominations every two years (since that’s when the Texas Legislature meets).  All the nominations are sent to the Texas Commission on the Arts.  Those that meet the TCA’s long list of requirements are invited to submit their portfolio/resume/list of works.  Out of that great list of people, the TCA narrows it down to a group of up to ten.  Then, the names go to a group of people educated in literature around the state who make the final decisions.  Those judges are kept anonymous to keep the politics away!  So, as you can see, just being nominated in Texas is a great honour, but to be selected is truly a dream come true. 

FullSizeRender (4a)

  1. Please tell us more about your Words of Preservation: Poets Laureate National Parks Tour.

I first learned about the upcoming 100th Birthday of the National Parks in 2013.  I knew I had to do something to celebrate.  Knowing there had not been adventurer writers dedicated to the Parks since the days of John Muir and Thoreau, I came up with the idea of visiting at least 50 of the 59 Parks, writing poetry, taking pictures and putting them in a book, with a percentage of the sales of that book to go back to the Park System.  I asked Alan Birkelbach to join me to increase the historic significance of the project – to have the works from not one, but two Poets Laureate!

He immediately agreed to do this with me!  Already, the result is wonderful – to witness and take part in this wonder, and see it reflected in two different ways.  This is the magic of poetry and the magic of nature – everyone who experiences it takes from it what they need.

FullSizeRender (5)

 

  1. The National Park Foundation has been encouraging people to #findyourpark  throughout their centennial celebration.  What are your personal Parks and why?

 We had to begin our Tour with Yellowstone, since that was the first official Park designated, but we both have a hard time choosing favorites.

I feel drawn to the magic of Yellowstone, the silence of Joshua Tree and the intimacy of the Guadalupe Mountains.

Alan is still in a state of wonder about Yellowstone, especially Lamar Valley, and a part of him is still trying to ponder the mysteries of Mesa Verde.

  1. Can you tell us a little bit about your background? Literary, education, anything of interest.

I studied Journalism from Texas A&M University, which is a good profession, especially for poets, since every word counts, but I have always written poetry.  I have to write.  I am pulled to it in inexplicable ways.  Being named Poet Laureate of Texas is one of my greatest honors.  It allows me to be the ambassador of the written word in ways I have always dreamed.

Alan started writing poetry when he was twelve.  He says his biggest regret is that he started so late!  He started writing more seriously in the late 70’s and received his degree in English from North Texas State University (now called University of North Texas).  He personally knew some of the earlier Texas Poets Laureate and is still honored that he gets to share that title.

  1. May we please have poems?

Yes!  Here are our most recent poems inspired from Guadalupe Mountain NP:

FullSizeRender

Guadalupe Mountain

What words are grand enough to speak of light –

the itch of orange, the streaking winks of pink?

Sun-shone hours turn belly-up, toward night

Good Day, Good Day is all that we can think.

Our legs a’tremble, muscles beastly sore,

a quest to know each vista, scene and swell.

Our soul’s now been imprinted evermore

and become something greater than ourselves.

These moments groom the core of who we are.

How could we come and not be wholly changed?

We’re mountain, wolf, and now, the evening star –

every atom of our hearts rearranged.

 

We came here knowing not what this might bring.

We leave in awe; we leave with everything.

 

karla k. morton, 2010 Texas State Poet Laureate

 

___________

IMG_2487  

1 a.m. Guadalupe Mountain 

Short-visioned men still think there is

a silent line that separates all things.

But I have seen the full moon strike the calcite

in the Guadalupe walls, heard

the horned owl sing a tufted dirge,

the small fox bark, the quails flutter, the pinions

sigh with green caressing wind, the crunch

of stones beneath my deep night boots.

I learned it then. I know it now.

There is a timbre here, a larger song. No lines.

One world. Full of music. One choir. One song.

–Alan Birkelbach,  2005 Texas State Poet Laureate 

————

  1. Where can people find out more about the two of you?  

Alan and I both have eleven published works each, many of which can be found online or at bookstores/Amazon/Barnes and Noble, etc.

Here is a facebook link: www.facebook.com/karlakmorton

and a website page: http://www.texaspoetlaureate.com/tour.html

that people may follow us along!

Also, we have just started a blog: Poets Park Tour

  1. Anything else you’d like to share?

We would just like to say that these lands, while under the preservation of the government, still need champions, still need those who are willing to give their time and hearts to make sure they continue to be protected.

Like Homer recounting the journey of Odysseus, we long to be the eyes and ears for the home-bound, to bring our tales back to the hearth.

We are certainly not the first artists who believe inspiration can come through great natural beauty, who have fallen in love with the grandeur of our National Parks, but we want to take it one step further and try to do something incredible – to infuse that beauty into the written word – the eternal language of poetry.

Read more!

Lone Star Literary: Interview with Karla K. Morton

Carlsbad, NM newspaper: Texas Poets Laureate Visit Guadalupe Mountains

Western Writers of America Roundup Magazine: Feature

All photos above by Karla K. Morton, used with permission.

And of course, if you’re interested in the Badlands blanket, remember that a portion of your purchase helps to support preservation of your national parks through our National Park Service.  See it here: Badlands Blanket

parkweek_FBphoto

Greg Hatten and the Great Outdoors: Moved by the Wallowas.

IMG_4825Ed. Note: It’s National Park Week, and in the spirit of outdoor adventures, we’re sharing excerpts from a post by our friend Greg Hatten of Wooden Boat Adventures fame. He  took a trip into the snowy Wallowa Mountains this spring (or what’s passing for spring here in Oregon), and experienced nowcats, fly-fishing, Pendleton blankets, hot beverages and lobster tails. Read on below.

Six hundred pounds of Oregon Elk thundered up the small freestone creek in a desperate dash for life as a pack of gray wolves gave chase. In a final powerful move to avoid the wolves at her heels, she wheeled left and attempted to jump up the six foot bank from the bottom of the creek bed. Her fate was sealed when her front legs sunk to her shoulders in four feet of deep snow. The trailing wolves, running lightly on a thin layer of crust, caught her quickly and ended the struggle for life at the top of the bank in a flurry of fangs and flesh.

Snow prints told the story.

IMG_5115

It was a solemn moment in the middle of a remote area that had taken us several hours and a variety of vehicles to reach. Our destination was a cabin by the river…We reached the little cabin, started a fire, unloaded gear, and propped our wet boots by the stove to dry out.

IMG_4850

Clearly this was going to be a steelhead trip to remember… but the Pendleton Whiskey after dinner would challenge us to recall the details. The next morning was clear and crisp. I slipped on my waders, slipped out the cabin door and hiked to the pools upstream.

IMG_5004

We fished hard all day – upstream, downstream, swinging, nymphing, plunking….. we tried it all with the same result. A fishless day – not at all uncommon or unfamiliar to steelhead fishermen…. and so, we headed to the cabin for ribs and lobster.

After another elegant dinner I grabbed my Therm-a-Rest cot, my sleeping bag, and my Pendleton blanket and headed for the river to do some open air winter sleeping down by the river.

IMG_4983

I explained it as a field test for winter gear – but I really wanted a closer connection to the river, the valley and the Nez Perce tribe of Native Americans that called this place “home” more than two hundred and fifty years before us. I looked up at the stars in the night sky and thought of them in this place.

IMG_4945

My breath was heavy and my nose was cold but the familiar sound of running water over rocks and the rawness of the night was something I’ll never forget. The image of the slaughtered Elk was something else I’ll never forget and a few times during the night imagined I was being surrounded by the Minam pack of wolves that patrols this valley and did my best to snore loudly hoping to be mistaken for a hibernating bear. When I woke to the first light of dawn, I was pretty glad I hadn’t been eaten by wolves and figured either they thought I was a sleeping bear, a mad dog, or a middle aged fly fisherman that wouldn’t taste very good…. or maybe the wolf pack was only in my dreams. I hiked up to the cabin and made coffee.

IMG_4844

IMG_4998

 

IMG_5028…it was time to pack up and leave the valley. We made our way back up the steep narrow trail and near the top we stopped for one final look down at the river snaking it’s way between the mountains of the Eagle Cap Wilderness.

In 1877, 800 members of the Nez Perce tribe and their 2,000 horses fled the valley and headed Northeast in a desperate attempt to elude the pursuers hot on their trail. They were searching for a new home and chased by the U.S. army for over 1,000 miles and three months across Idaho and parts of Montana before a final bloody battle less than 40 miles from the safety of Canada. It was the battle in the foothills of the Bear’s Paw Mountains where the Nez Perce were finally forced to surrender and Chief Joseph is said to have pronounced to the remaining Chiefs and the U.S. Army “Hear me, my chiefs! I am tired. My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever.”

IMG_5048

As I looked over the raw beauty of the Wallowa valley with the steep dark green Mountains on all sides dusted with a fine layer of white snow tumbling into the river below, his words took on a depth that made me ache for his people and the way of life they gave up. I was moved by the Wallowas.

IMG_4827

Read the full post here: Moved by the Wallowas

All photography courtesy Greg Hatten

 

pendleton-khaki-chief-jo-20086-518z

See product here:

Chief Joseph blanket (tan)

Pendleton Buffalo Creation mug

Men’s wool shirts by Pendleton