Washable Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool in New Cabin Stripes

Good for the Earth

We’re always excited about our Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool offerings; throws and bed blankets that pass strict standards of sustainability and environmental stewardship. We’re especially excited about our newest striped Eco-Wise Wool throws in four new Cabin Stripes.

These throws combine the simple, enduring appeal of stripes with the heathered yarns that make our Yakima Camp blankets so popular. Our goal with the Cabin Stripes was to create a palette that ranged from cool neutrals to warm earth tones that will work in sophisticated living rooms, comfy lounges, cabins, lofts, and campers. We want this throw to go anywhere!

Which one is your favorite?

Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool throw in Oxford

Oxford

Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool throw in Shale

Shale

Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool throw in Grey

Grey

Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool throw in Faun

Faun

A Little History

Striped blankets in heathered wool have a long history that stretches back to the ombre-striped bedrolls use by cattle hands and shepherds in the American West. During the day, they were tightly rolled and tied to the saddle, and at night they were unrolled for a night’s rest under the stars.

Made in American with naturally renewable wool, each Eco-Wise throw is machine washable, and will hold its color through every wash. You might not be unrolling yours by the campfire at night after a long day on the trail. But maybe you’ll drape one over your shoulders on a summer night when the temperature drops.

See them here: Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool Throws

Made in USA label with eagle for Pendleton

Five Best Pendleton Gifts for Hosts

Saying Thank-You

They’ve opened their home to you for hospitality and celebration. What do you bring along to say thank you? A bottle of wine is welcome and traditional. Isn’t there a more lasting way to express your gratitude?

Here are our top five ideas for gifts for the host or hostess.

#5 National Park Coffee Mugs

Start the day with the Great Outdoors. These oversized mugs pay tribute to America’s Treasures with their designs based on labels for our popular National Park Series blankets.

Pendleton's oversized mugs, emblazoned with the labels and stripes of  Pendleton national Park blankets, are set out on a rustic set of steps made from weathered bricks.

 

#4 Oversized Spa Towels

Whether used at the beach or as a bath sheet at home, there is a towel to suit everyone’s personality here, including fun collabs with Disney, Harry Potter and Tommy Bahama.

Colorful Pendleton beach and spa towels are draped on the rungs of three wooden ladders, and one is in a basket on the tile floor.

 

#3 Pendleton x Yeti Yoga Mats

Namaste. Need we say more? Photo by Kristian Irey.

A young woman does a pose on a Pendleton x Yeti yoga mat, on a beach in front of a distant mountain range.

 

#2 Roll-Up Blanket

A year-round favorite for picnics, concerts and sporting events, our roll-up will be ready to go anywhere with your host, thanks to its built-in handle.

A Pendleton roll-up blanket in a black and red plaid with a black nylon backing and built-in handle with brown leather grip.

#1 – The 5th Avenue Throw

Luxury from our USA mills in 100% merino wool. Now, that’s how you say thank you!

A folded Pendleton 5th Avenue throw in a soft blue plaid.

If you need more ideas, visit www.pendleton-usa. And have a wonderful holiday!

 

BodyVox and Pendleton

Dance and innovation

BodyVox, the innovative Portland dance company, creates work that breaks boundaries in the most beautiful ways. From their website:

Breathtaking productions rich in imagery, athleticism and humor: Led by Emmy Award-winning choreographers Jamey Hampton and Ashley Roland, BodyVox is known for its visual virtuosity, distinctive wit and unique ability to combine dance, theater and film into breathtaking productions rich in imagery, athleticism and humor. Since its founding in 1997, BodyVox has toured to critical acclaim on stages around the world, developed 9 award winning films, 30 original shows and 3 operas, featuring more than 200 original dances.

The Calendar

We were delighted to open our BodyVox 2017 calendar and find some beautiful shots featuring Pendleton. March takes flight with this image.

A dancer from the BodyVox company leaps in the air with a Pendleton Water blanket.

Photo courtesy BodyVox, used with permission

Of course, you all recognize the Original Board Shirt made famous by the Beach Boys. The blanket is the Water Blanket from our series that benefits the American Indian College Fund.

The Water Blanket

The Water blanket.

Inspired by a blanket in an early 20th-century photograph by Edward S. Curtis, this blanket is inspired by the peerless weaving of the American Southwest. It incorporates classic Navajo elements in an eye-dazzling pattern. The central dragonfly, an emblem of water, symbolizes life.

See it here: Water Blanket

Shirts & beanies

Later in the calendar, we found this gravity-defying hackysack game.

Two BodyVox dancers leap in the air surrounded by hackysacks.

Photo courtesy BodyVox, used with permission

More Information:

You can check out our accessories here: Pendleton Accessories

You can see The Original Board Shirt here: Board Shirt (original Blue Surf Plaid)

And see the Water blanket here: The College Fund Water Blanket

That Pendleton Blanket Instameet: Cannon Beach

Host with the Most

Updated CannonBeach invitation

In April, we hosted an Instameet at Cannon Beach . Photographers came together to connect, share photo opportunities and models, and enjoy Stumptown cold brew, a bonfire and a hotdog roast! People brought their Pendleton blankets and wore their Pendleton flannels. Families, cameras, dogs and above it all, the beauty of Haystack Rock, an Oregon Coast icon.

Below is just a sampling of images sent to us. You can find more on Instagram, of course (#thatpnwmeet) . The photos capture the #mypendleton experience through so many lenses (all rights to all images: Pendleton Woolen Mills).

An Instameet crowd gathers at Cannon Beach, Oregon
Handing out refreshments
Building a beach fire!
A family sits on their Pendleton blanket at Cannon Beach
A pug (wearing a Pendleton Pet collar) gazes at Haystack Rock
Three people sit on a Pendleton blanket in front of Haystack Rock
A woman sits on the beach in front of Haystack Rock, wrapped in a Pendleton Camp blanket.
A man in silhouette in front of Haystack Rock

We want to thank everyone who came out and had a good time.

What’s Next?

If you missed the fun at cannon Beach, please don’t be sad. We’re part of another Instameet this Saturday, June 25th 2016, meeting at 4 PM at Trillium Lake on Mount Hood. Square Mile Cider is one of the sponsors, and there will be some Pendleton and MVMT giveaways!

Trillium Lake Invitation

Hosted by @idkpdx @kyle.pnw @richbacon @temporaryeternal @jordan_littleton – contact them on Instagram for more information.

We can’t wait to see your #mypendleton shots on Instagram.

#seeyouattrillium #mypendleton #pendleton #instameet #pnw #thatpnwlife #oregon #pnwonderland #oregonexplored

That #PNW #pendletonblanket Instameet!

UpdatedCannonBeach_imageWe’ve teamed up with @ownthelight @robstrok @thatpnwlife @iamshpak to host an epic Instameet at Cannon Beach this Saturday, April 30th at 3pm.

We will be grilling hot dogs, with coffee and s’mores for everyone!

Plus we’ll have prizes.

And a BONFIRE.

Tell your friends, grab your Pendleton blankets and join the Instameet party on the beach! #mypendleton #thatpnwmeet #thatpnwlife #wwim13

 

Rules behind the cut.

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Greg Hatten in Yellowstone

A repost to celebrate an anniversary

Our friend Greg Hatten, the WoodenBoat adventurer, is floating some of our country’s National Parks as part of the centennial celebration of the National Park Service. To celebrate Yellowstone national park’s 144th birthday, we are looking back at Greg’s trip on the Yellowstone River. Enjoy!

Greg hatten in his wooden boat

All About Greg

Greg Hatten is an accomplished guide and fisherman who splits his time between Missouri and Oregon. He is happiest on the river in his wooden drift boat, the Portola.  Greg’s Portola was built to the exact specs of the original Portola piloted by conservationist Martin Litton down the Colorado River in 1964 as part of a historic journey that helped save the Grand Canyon. As difficult as it is to believe, there were plans at the time to dam the Colorado River, flood the Grand Canyon and turn it into a gigantic reservoir.  Wooden drift boaters took to the river, along with a documentary crew, to make a film that brought national attention to the proposed reservoir project. This river journey helped save the Grand Canyon for future generations. Greg’s 2014 recreation of this journey is part of his larger commitment to our National Parks.

In honor of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, Greg is running rivers through some of our most beloved Parks. Pendleton will be following his journeys on our blog, starting with his trip to Yellowstone Lake.

Greg Hatten's rig and boat at Yellowstone Lake

As Greg says in his blog post:

On this WoodenBoat adventure… it was late May and the lakes in Yellowstone National Park were free of ice earlier this year than anyone could remember. Usually on Memorial Day weekend, this park is just waking up from its winter hibernation – the snow is patchy in places, the campgrounds are just starting to open, and the staff and crew coming from around the country to work for the summer are learning the answers to hundreds of questions they will be asked by the visiting tourists from around the world. The park was green, the wildlife was stirring and except for the sparse number of tourists, it seemed like it was midseason.

Tent and cot with Yellowstone blanket

Greg sets up camp Pendleton-style, in a canvas tent with our Yellowstone National Park blanket AND one of our newest products. Greg has only good things to say about our new roll-ups, which are virgin wool camp blankets attached to a new waxed cotton fabric that we are just a little bit proud of.

New_rollup blankets

As you can see, so far we are offering this blanket in Badlands, Glacier and Grand Canyon. Greg says it sleeps like a dream in the wild, and we trust his opinion. So go read all about his trip on his WoodenBoat blog, especially the meal. Everyone here in the office wants to try Greg’s campsite cuisine!

A round logo for the Pendleton National Park Collection.

More Wool Fun Facts for January

PlaidSheep

 

More fun facts about wool from another one of our old Education & Testing Department pieces:

Wool History:

Wool has been an integral part of human life and culture. One of its nicknames is the fiber of civilization.

The sheep industry began in central Asia over 10,000 years ago.

Wool-spinning began in 3500 BC. The first sheep were black; white sheep were a genetic exception that became highly prized because they produce dyeable fiber. Today, black sheep are the genetic exception.

In biblical times, wool was used to collect water; a fleece was left out overnight in the desert to draw dew, to be wrung out the next morning.

Wool fiber has overlapping scales. When heat, moisture and pressure are applied, the scales interlock into an irreversible tangle, as you may have discovered if you ever accidentally washed and dried your favorite wool sweater. This is called “felting.”

Wool was probably first used in felted form as lining for helmets and armor, padding for sandals, cushions for riding horses and camels, and as durable, portable housing for nomadic peoples.

For Asian nomads, wool was so important that in the fourth century, the Chinese called their territory “the land of felt.”

Today, felt is used in felt-tip pens, industrial applications, garments and heavy-duty wool blankets.

Two sheep stand in a field, looking at the camera.

The Politics of Wool:

Spain recognized the commercial value of wool, making it a capital offense to export merino sheep.

England’s first great industry was wool. In the Middle Ages, it was the natrion’s largest export resource, with every European country relying on England for wool.

Germany eventually broke England’s hold on the wool market in 1765, when a Spanish king sent 92 rams and 128 ewes to Germany. By the turn of that century, Germany was flooding England’s wool market.

The Medici family of Florence, Italy built their wealth on the wool trade. Their banking industry allowed them the financial ease to offer patronage to artists like Dante, da Vinci and Michelangelo.

Australia’s economy is based on wool and sheep. The first sheep arrived in Australia in 1788 on an English ship full of convicts.

The American Revolution was in part ignited by a stiff tariff imposed to restrict American wool trade to England.

a Shetland sheep

Wool Language:

“Dyed in the wool” means genuine and permanent.

To “fleece him” means to swindle him.

To “pull the wool over his eyes” is to fool him.

“Shoddy” is also a wool reference. The term meant re-used wool in Civil War times, and became associated with inferior workmanship.

A “spinster” was an unmarried woman who earned her keep by spinning wool.

A “wolf in sheep’s clothing” is a predator disguised with gentleness.

A “bellwether” is the lead sheep in a flock, and is used to note a change or new direction.

 

More fun facts about the properties of wool will be coming your way this month, because January is a wonderful month for staying warm, and wool does that so well. 

Pendleton Heritage Umatilla Wool — VIDEO with Cameron Krebs

Two men (Cameron Krebs and his father) stand in a flock of sheep. The younger man is holding his toddler-aged daughter in his arms.

Wool is What We Do

We are Pendleton Woolen Mills, and wool is what we do. Just watch and listen to Cameron Krebs, a wool grower from Umatilla County, talking about his family’s generations as wool providers to Pendleton Woolen Mills.

Properties of Wool

So here are some amazing wool facts for you, courtesy of us, from our trusty “Wool, A Natural” booklet, a little classroom staple for many years now.

Wool is a Miracle Fiber that Stands the Test of Time

Wool is a natural fiber, growing from the follicles of sheep. In a time of sustainability and environmental consciousness, this renewable resource remains longer-lasting and better looking than anything man-made. Even though advanced processing methods have made wool more versatile and easy care, man has not improved the miracle fiber itself. 

Wool is Naturally Resilient and Wrinkle Resistant

This is due to the ability of the fiber to spring back into shape after bending, creasing, or compression. Resilience gives wool its ability to hold a shape, resist wrinkles and withstand wear. This makes wool great for travel. It resists tearing because it’s flexible. Wool can bend back on itself 20,000 times without breaking (cotton only 3200 times before breaking/silk 1800 times/rayon only 75 times). Wool can be stretched or twisted and its cells return to their original position.

Wool is Naturally Comfortable

Wool fibers cannot be packed down. They spring back to shape keeping their open, porous nature. Wool provides the most warmth with the least weight. The air that is trapped inside (about 80% of wool fabric volume) makes wool an excellent insulator to keep the body at its normal temperature year round: warm in winter and cool in summer. Wool is the original outdoor “performance” fiber. 

Wool is Naturally Water and Stain Repellent

Wool repels light water, like a rain shower, because of the membrane on the outer scales. In very wet conditions, wool absorbs up to 30% of its own weight without feeling damp. And because of insulation ability, wool “breathes,” allowing the body’s natural moisture to pass through. The hairy surface of wool and its freedom from static make it the easiest of all fabrics to keep clean or to clean after soiling. 

Wool Maintains its Luster and Resists Fading

Wool has a permanent natural luster it never loses even after years of hard wear. It absorbs dyes until it is completely saturated so colors stay brilliant in spite of sunshine, perspiration and impurities in the atmosphere. No other fiber can be spun or woven into such a variety of weights, textures, finishes and colors. 

Wool is Naturally Flame Retardant

Unless it is in direct contact with flame, wool will extinguish itself. The denser the weave and the greater the fabric weight, the less likely it is even to char because of its smaller oxygen content. Fire departments and insurance companies recommend the use of wool blankets, rugs or coats to put out flames.

We will be bringing you more fun facts about wool this month, because January is an excellent month for keeping warm. And thanks to the Krebs family for their participation in this video!

Cameron Krebs, a Pendleton wool grower, holds his duahgter in his arms and stands with his mother and father, looking at a flock of sheep grazing in a cottonwood grove.