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Posts from the ‘Pendleton Woolen Mills’ Category

That Pendleton Blanket Instameet: Cannon Beach

UpdatedCannonBeach_imageIn April, we hosted an Instameet at Cannon Beach . Photographers came together to connect, share photo opportunities and models, and enjoy Stumptown cold brew, a bonfire and a hotdog roast! People brought their Pendleton blankets and wore their Pendleton flannels. Families, cameras, dogs and above it all, the beauty of Haystack Rock, an oregon Coast icon.

Below is just a sampling of images sent to us. You can find more on Instagram, of course (#thatpnwmeet) . The photos capture the #mypendleton experience through so many lenses (all rights to all images: Pendleton Woolen Mills).

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We want to thank everyone who came out and had a good time.

If you missed the fun at cannon Beach, please don’t be sad. We’re part of another Instameet this Saturday, June 25th 2016, meeting at 4 PM at Trillium Lake on Mount Hood. Square Mile Cider is one of the sponsors, and there will be some Pendleton and MVMT giveaways!

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Hosted by @idkpdx @kyle.pnw @richbacon @temporaryeternal @jordan_littleton – contact them on Instagram for more information.

We can’t wait to see your #mypendleton shots on Instagram.

#seeyouattrillium #mypendleton #pendleton #instameet #pnw #thatpnwlife #oregon #pnwonderland #oregonexplored

 

That #PNW #pendletonblanket Instameet!

UpdatedCannonBeach_imageWe’ve teamed up with @ownthelight @robstrok @thatpnwlife @iamshpak to host an epic Instameet at Cannon Beach this Saturday, April 30th at 3pm.

We will be grilling hot dogs, with coffee and s’mores for everyone!

Plus we’ll have prizes.

And a BONFIRE.

Tell your friends, grab your Pendleton blankets and join the Instameet party on the beach! #mypendleton #thatpnwmeet #thatpnwlife #wwim13

 

Rules behind the cut.

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Greg Hatten in Yellowstone

Our friend Greg Hatten, the WoodenBoat adventurer, is floating some of our country’s National Parks as part of the centennial celebration of the National Park Service. To celebrate Yellowstone national park’s 144th birthday, we are looking back at Greg’s trip on the Yellowstone River. Enjoy!

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Greg Hatten is an accomplished guide and fisherman who splits his time between Missouri and Oregon. He is happiest on the river in his wooden drift boat, the Portola.  Greg’s Portola was built to the exact specs of the original Portola piloted by conservationist Martin Litton down the Colorado River in 1964 as part of a historic journey that helped save the Grand Canyon. As difficult as it is to believe, there were plans at the time to dam the Colorado River, flood the Grand Canyon and turn it into a gigantic reservoir.  Wooden drift boaters took to the river, along with a documentary crew, to make a film that brought national attention to the proposed reservoir project. This river journey helped save the Grand Canyon for future generations. Greg’s 2014 recreation of this journey is part of his larger commitment to our National Parks.

In honor of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, Greg is running rivers through some of our most beloved Parks. Pendleton will be following his journeys on our blog, starting with his trip to Yellowstone Lake.

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On this WoodenBoat adventure… it was late May and the lakes in Yellowstone National Park were free of ice earlier this year than anyone could remember. Usually on Memorial Day weekend, this park is just waking up from its winter hibernation – the snow is patchy in places, the campgrounds are just starting to open, and the staff and crew coming from around the country to work for the summer are learning the answers to hundreds of questions they will be asked by the visiting tourists from around the world. The park was green, the wildlife was stirring and except for the sparse number of tourists, it seemed like it was midseason.

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Greg sets up camp Pendleton-style, in a canvas tent with our Yellowstone National Park blanket AND one of our newest products. Greg has only good things to say about our new roll-ups, which are virgin wool camp blankets attached to a new waxed cotton fabric that we are just a little bit proud of.

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As you can see, so far we are offering this blanket in Badlands, Glacier and Grand Canyon. Greg says it sleeps like a dream in the wild, and we trust his opinion. So go read all about his trip on his WoodenBoat blog, especially the meal. Everyone here in the office wants to try Greg’s campsite cuisine!

George’s Best Day with Pendleton Pet

 

We can’t express our happiness at being part of the story of George’s Best Day. George is a service dog who helps a young lady named Bella with walking.

Watch and enjoy George’s best day. We promise, it will give your own day a mighty lift.

 

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Photo courtesy of ABC news

Learn more about BarkBox here: BARKBOX

And you can see Pendleton Pet products here, including George’s Gigantic Bed: Pendleton Pet

Airstream & Pendleton. Your dreams came true.

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The new Pendleton Airstream is causing a stir, as it brings together two iconic American brands in in the #liveriveted Airstream of your dreams. Enjoy these photos, taken in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, before we could even TALK about this project!

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The special touches start at the front door…

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…and continue through the interior.

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Pendleton motifs that celebrate our National Parks are embossed on the leather seating and stenciled on the storage doors.

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A selection of Pendleton Home goods from our National Park Collection furnishes your Airstream in Pendleton style.

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And don’t forget your best friend.

 

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The Pendleton Airstream isn’t just a wonderful way to explore the National Parks. It’s a wonderful way to support the Parks. A portion from the sale of each of the 100 limited edition Pendleton Airstreams will help support the National Park Foundation, which maintains and preserves our National Treasures for future generations.

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So if you’re ready to start living your dream life today, contact Airstream for more information here: PENDLETON AIRSTREAM

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Happy Trails!

 

ICONS UNITE: TIMBERLAND X PENDLETON

Today’s post is brought to you by Timberland. Enjoy!

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UNDERSTATED LUXURY

Pendleton wool – an American classic since 1863 – sets the standard for warmth, hardiness, and vintage style for fabric.

For our Winter Wool Collection, we’ve partnered with the heritage fabric company to create items with exceptional craftsmanship – jackets, boots and backpacks.  The fabric used in our latest collection from Pendleton’s dates from 1973 – the year the Original Yellow Boot came to be.

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Creative Director Chris Pawlus explains, “For this collection, we were inspired to re-imagine a classic material, wool. Wool is a high quality, durable, natural material that can really express style when we elevate the material through design. This collection is rooted in tradition, but designed for everyday adventures on the Modern Trail.”

This legendary brand has woven a touch of understated luxury into some of our most iconic workwear essentials. Dare to wear the vintage look without looking like your grandfather in our Pendleton collection.

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​Our Men’s Heston Waterproof Boots get a vintage makeover with a custom Pendleton wool cuff. The craftsmanship that makes these boots the best – top quality leather, seam-sealed waterproof construction, Green Rubber recycled lug outsoles, insulation – make them hardy, but the Pendleton wool gives them the ideal  touch of retro style.

If you want a bolder look with the classic wool pattern, go for the Roll-Top Boots. With the rolled down fabric showing off the heritage Pendleton wool and the sole designed for traction, you can wear this boot throughout the winter season in any weather.

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Effortless vintage style defines the Women’s Whittemore Wool Accent Lace-Up Boots. A slim fit with premium leather and subtly stacked heel make this a perfect pair of everyday boots. The pocket of heritage pattern that graces the cuff make them one-of-a-kind and the OrthoLite footbeds are seriously comfortable for long walks, backyard bonfires or city dates.

See style blogger Jessica Kirby style the Whittemore Wool Accent Lace Up Boots here.

RETRO COATS

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Vintage revival takes center stage with our Men’s Shrewsbury Peak Plaid Down Jacket. Featuring a 100 percent Pendleton plaid wool exterior and premium leather trim, this is a striking coat in a classic design. With the shearling collar, removable hood and 600-fill goose down to fight off the freeze, you’ll look sharp and stay warm. The tartan style is bold, unforgettable, and a cold weather classic.

CLASSIC BACKPACKS

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For any outfit, you need an accessory – and  we love a statement backpack. The New Original 23-Liter Pendleton Wool Backpack is one such bag. Contemporary design meets Pendleton’s heritage plaid for a vintage style that’s been designed for modern life. A quick access laptop pouch and interior pockets make school, work, or weekend adventures easy to navigate. The throwback custom wool and premium leather accents make it an original.

This winter, don’t miss out on this collaboration. When two American icons partner to combine premium leather with heritage wool, the result is well-crafted heritage patterns on your favorite items.

 Other styles here: SHOP at Timberland.com

Jackson Sundown, the Bishop Brothers, and the Pendleton Round-Up. Let’er Buck!

Note: In honor of the Pendleton Round-Up, we’re sharing an older post about Jackson Sundown, who is one of the great riders of the American West. It explains our company’s long and rich connection with the Pendleton Round-Up. And you might want to read our earlier post about an exhibit of Jackson Sundown’s personal effects, with photos of modern-day volunteers raising the actual teepee in the historic shot below: see it here.  Let’er Buck!

The Pendleton Round-up  starts this week—an amazing rodeo adventure in Pendleton, Oregon, celebrating its 102nd year. Our designers travel there for inspiration, entertainment, and to watch our westernwear in action on rodeo competitors and fans. Oregon Public Broadcasting has a video titled “Pendleton Round-Up: The Wild West Way”  that’s well worth watching, and Cowboys & Indians magazine has some great background.

Among the historic images, you’ll see this shot:

This is Roy Bishop and Jackson Sundown posing at the Pendleton Round-Up. This image actually made the fashion blogs in 2009, when recreations of Roy Bishop’s fringed coat and Jackson Sundown’s oval-print shirt were part of Pendleton’s Centennial offering. But the story is about more than fashion history. This photo is about rodeo history.

The association of Pendleton Woolen Mills and the Round-Up goes back to the very beginning, when along with his brothers Clarence and Chauncey, Roy Bishop established the first mill at its current location in Pendleton, Oregon. The brothers combined their production and retailing expertise with an idled mill, a river, and fine fleece provided by local wool growers. Back then, PWM was a blanket company. Our first and most valued customer was the Native American, and the Bishop brothers worked hard to fill the strong demand (we still sell approximately 60% of our blankets to Native customers every year).

The Bishops were key to the conception of the first Round-Up. Rodeos are big business now, and they were big business then. It was an undertaking to get to a rodeo, especially for a working cowboy. The Round-Up needed something special to draw the crowd. It was unheard-of to include Native Americans to a Western rodeo, but Roy Bishop rode out to meet tribal leaders and invite their participation. He was politely received and quietly listened to, but he left without receiving a definite answer.

The rodeo’s starting date approached, and still he waited. On the morning before the rodeo began, Roy stepped out on the mill’s loading dock. In the distance, he had his answer when he saw the dust of the tribes as they made their way to the Indian campground. The cooperation between the Columbia Basin tribes and the Pendleton Round-up, unique among modern rodeos, continues to this day.

So what about the other person in this photo?

Jackson Sundown was born Waaya-Tonah-Toesits-Kahn in 1863 in Montana. During the Nez Perce war of 1877, he rode with Sitting Bull, retreating to Canada with the Sioux. He eventually returned to Washington, then to Idaho, then to Montana, supporting himself by working, breeding and breaking horses.

In 1912, at the age of 49, Waaya-Tonah-Toesits-Kahn began entering rodeo events in Canada and Idaho using the name Jackson Sundown. The crowds went wild when he tied his braids under his chin, lifted his sombrero and started the ride, his wooly angora chaps streaming.

He took so many prizes that other riders refused to challenge him. Stock owners pulled their animals when they saw his name on the list of possible riders, as after Jackson Sundown rode a horse, it might be so thoroughly mastered that it never bucked again.

Jackson Sundown entered the Pendleton Round-Up several times, placing but not winning. In 1915, in a controversial decision, he placed third and decided to retire from rodeo riding. But a sculptor named Alexander Phimister Proctor prevailed upon him to try one more time. In 1916, he did. Jackson Sundown came out of the gate on a horse named Angel, and the spectacular ride that followed has become legendary. The crowd went wild, and threatened to take down the grandstands board-by-board if Sundown wasn’t awarded the title he had so clearly won.

At twice the age of his competitors, the lanky six-foot tall Indian not only won the bucking championship, but the all-around title as well. He lived out his life on the Nez Perce reservation, raising horses and passing on his skills until his death in 1923. He’s been inducted into more rodeo and athletic halls-of-fame than we have space to list. He is a key character in a novel by Ken Kesey, The Last Go ‘Round.

Jackson Sundown is also featured in a terrific documentary called “American Cowboys.” This is a detailed look at the frustration of competitive riding for contestants of color. It was playing at the Tamastslikt Cultural Center just outside Pendleton, which is a fantastic place to learn about the history of the tribes of the Columbia Basin. It may or may not be part of their permanent installation, but this documentary includes footage of Sundown riding. Sadly, photographs of him riding rare; this may be the only one.

It is sad that a man who possessed such incredible skills in horsemanship isn’t shown during more of his competitive rides. But there are plenty of images of Jackson Sundown showing his deep understanding of a wardrobe’s role in a great performance. Chaps, hat, and that aloof expression. Jackson Sundown had it all, a fact well-illustrated by this logo for the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. Yes, that is Jackson Sundown.

So today, in honor of the Pendleton Round-Up, please enjoy these images of Jackson Sundown; Nez Perce warrior, compatriot of Sitting Bull, bronc rider, horse breeder, main character, documentary subject, fashion blog icon, Round-Up Champion and Inductee into the Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum.

And a true proponent of individual style.

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Mill Tribute Blankets by Pendleton: The Buell Manufacturing Company of St. Joseph, Missouri

In 2010, Pendleton Woolen Mills introduced our Tribute Series, paying homage to the American mills that thrived during the Golden Age of Native American Trade blankets. 

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In the early part of the 20th century, Pendleton Woolen Mills was one of five major mills weaving Trade blankets. The Buell Manufacturing Company of St. Joseph, Missouri, incorporated in 1877. St. Joseph was the gateway to a booming Wild West, thanks to homesteading and the Gold Rush. The Buell mill, operated by Norman Buell, his son George, and another partner named John Lemon, was well-run and successful.

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According to the county records of 1904, the Buell Manufacturing employed 175 workers and used more than a million pounds of wool a year. Buell products were sold in every state of the Union (45, to be exact).  Buell products included far more than their Trade blankets. Their colorful designs were only a fraction of the products woven by Buell from 1877 to 1912. Since the Pendleton mill opened in 1909, we were only competitors for three seasons.

buellcoverAccording to our friend Barry Friedman in his book Chasing Rainbows, “The blankets produced by Buell Manufacturing are without question the truest copies of Navajo and Pueblo Indian designs.” The original Buell blanket designs were given tribal names in keeping with America’s romantic view of the west during those years. We’ve included the original names strictly for your information. Please keep in mind that the Buell designs often bore little-to-no resemblance to the weavings of that particular tribe.  Our re-weavings of these blankets are simply named for the original manufacturer, with the number of the blanket in the series.

Buell #6available here ) was originally called the “Choctaw” or the “Spider and Hawk” design.

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Buell #5 available here was called the “Winnebago.” Though Buell has a darker palette than many of the other mills producing blankets back in the day, this blanket is an eye-popper.

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Buell #4 (retired) was called the “Ojibwa.” Dale Chihuly has one of the originals in his incredible collection of Trade blankets. The banded design of diamonds, stripes, stars and that central sawtooth band is just gorgeous.

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Buell #3 (retired) features a rare pictorial element–bands of Thunderbirds. Buell blankets were generally without any type of representational figures. This banded pattern was known as the “Comanche.”

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Buell #2  (retired) is called the “Zuni” pattern in the Buell catalog, but is actually a copy of a Hopi manta according to Barry Friedman (who knows pretty much everything there is to know about Trade blankets).

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Buell #1 (retired) is named “Aztec” in the original Buell catalog. It was offered in at least four different color combinations. An example in this coloration is also part of the fabled Chihuly collection of Native American Trade blankets. This blanket was a bestseller in our first year of the Tribute series.

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Buell blankets are among the most rare and most sought after by collectors today. This mill actually accomplished a major commercial weaving innovation–the incorporation of a third color in a weaving line. This was beyond the capabilities of Pendleton Woolen Mills at the time, so we tip our hat to the Buell Manufacturing Company of St. Joseph, Missouri.

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Portlandia and Pendleton. It just keeps happening.

Here in Portland, where Pendleton Woolen Mills is headquartered, we have been invested in Portlandia since it started.

The introduction at a meeting went something like this: “There’s a new show that’s going to film in Portland. Basically, it’s just going to make fun of us. And they want some product.”

We were fine with that. It wouldn’t be Portlandia without Pendleton blankets.

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Here’s a little tour of the blankets we’ve seen over the seasons.

This last season, we were honored to have our Journey West blanket as the backdrop for the dramatic and unforgettable back story of Toni and Candace, as narrated from the sofa in the Feminist Bookstore.

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One of our jackets had some sushi, too.

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We’ve been in a few more skits in Season Five, and will grab those stills as we can. But we thought it might be nice to recap the blankets of seasons past for you.

Who could forget the skit about binge-watching, back before we even knew how to call it binge-watching? Our watchers and their Glacier National Park blanket became progressively more rumpled as they watched just. One. More. Episode. Of Battlestar Galactica.

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Our favorite shot, bar none, is this one. Ah, the days of wine and Eddie Vedder. IFC gave away this fringed Chief Joseph dance shawl in a haiku contest on Facebook, back in the good old days when Facebook was a fun place to have contests.

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Our serapes made some peeks here and there, including this skit about a hippy who betrays his band of free-thinking friends by sneaking away to pursue his personal fitness goals at a gym.

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Another serape makes an appearance in a skit about an extremely disappointing brother-in-law. Even the dog is disappointed.

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Another Portlandia dog keeps company with the perpetually unemployed husband who needs a babysitter while he stays home all day, not looking for work. The dog takes center stage on our Glacier National Park throw.

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Carrie exercises “The Nuclear Option” to free herself from the tyranny of social media on our Abiquiu Sunset blanket.

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It’s never too late to sit in your immaculate Craftsman bungalow and learn the history of hip hop with our Chimayo throw, and that’s one of our Beach Shack shirts, too.

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A cringe-inducing tailgate party with Earl Grey tea and tofu meatless balls includes a quite pile of our throws and saddle blankets.

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Carrie and Fred have had so much fun at our expense. We’re looking forward to Season Six to see what else they will skewer. Portland and its earnestly recycling citizens realize that we’re great comedy fodder. There’s just so much to work with here.

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We know one day you’ll be through with us, Portlandia. But until then?

Carry on, Portlandia. Carry on.

Mothers Day is on the Way: Hand-Stitched Home by Susan Beal

Mothers Day is coming soon, and of course Pendleton has so many ways to show her you care. But you may be looking for something unique and handmade to honor a special mom.

We would like to suggest one of these charming planters in Pendleton wool, designed by Amy Alan of Really Handmade.

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Photography by Burcu Avsar

Amy’s planter is one of the projects curated by Susan Beal in her book, Hand-Stitched Home, published by The Taunton Press. Susan’s book is full of ideas, patterns and advice, with projects geared to all levels of crafting skill.

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Cover by The Taunton Press, copyright 2014, with photography by Burcu Avsar

Susan is one of the bright lights in the Portland crafting community. She blogs at West Coast Crafty, one of the most popular crafting blogs around. She’s a charming person with so many ideas, and she appreciates the properties of wool that make it so wonderful to work with. We love what she’s done with our wool-by-the-yard. If you know a crafting mom, her book would make a wonderful Mothers Day gift.

Susan assures us that Amy Alan’s planter project is fast, fun, and simple. We love the results. And if you’re not quite motivated for Mothers Day, don’t forget, there’s Fathers Day coming, too. We love the fabric below for that, and the pattern is easily adapted to one of our colorful jacquard patterns. This is a fun way to give with a personalized Pendleton touch.

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You can follow Amy Alan here:

blog:  reallyhandmade.com/

Instagram: @amyalan

And follow Susan Beal here:

blog: westcoastcrafty.com

Instagram: @westcoastcrafty

Buy the book: Hand-Stitched Home

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