Pendleton Towels, ready for Summer Fun

A group of children stand on a dock by a lake, all wrapped in colorful patterned Pendleton beach towels.

Customer photo used with permission; all rights reserved

Pendleton Beach & Spa Towels for Summer

Summer is here, and it’s time to put your Pendleton towels to work. We are making that a little easier for you with a sale that runs through Monday, July 15th, 2019. All our beach/spa towels are on sale for only 39.99 – check it out at your local Pendleton store, or at our website: www.pendleton-usa.com

A young man with brushy blond hair dries his face with a Pendleton Spider Rock patterned beach towel.

Photo by Max Mueller; all rights reserved

The reviews on these towels tell the story.

“These towels are dense, luxurious and beautifully designed. I bought two at the Grand Canyon gift shop and since then have a growing collection of these cool designs. I love Pendleton so much that I recently gave their hoodie towel as a baby gift.” – Austin T X

“I buy one a year and have also received 2 as gifts. Love these towels. They’re like art pieces hanging in my bathroom and they double as a blanket for outdoor concerts.” – Pacific NW

“It’s almost embarrassing how much I absolutely love these towels. I wanted something beautifully made, luxuriously big and super absorbent to have ready for sunny days by the pool. The hanging loop is a nice extra touch–though I keep them rolled in a big wire basket by the door because they are gorgeous enough to keep out on display.” – Scottsdale AZ

“I bought one of these towels for my husband for Christmas and we loved it so much we bought three more for ourselves and two as gifts. They are so absorbent and yet thin enough to dry out quickly, even in a city as humid as Houston.” – Houston TX

A young woman wrapped in an orange Pendleton beach towel stands on a wooden deck, looking at a swimming pool. Her back is to the camera and she is wearing a straw hat.

Photo by Joe Goger; all rights reserved

Made in Green

But wait, there’s more! These towels are more than beautiful. With cotton production and manufacture under scrutiny today, we are extremely proud of our OEKO-TEX® Made in Green certification.

What exactly does this mean? These towels are made following environmentally-friendly standards and under safe, socially responsible working conditions as certified by OEKO-TEX®. OEKO-TEX® Made in Green is an independent textile label that ensures products are made without harmful substances, using environmentally friendly processes under safe and socially responsible working conditions.

Two little girls who look like sisters, with blond braided hair, stand in front of water, wrapped in Pendleton beach towels.

Customer photo used with permission; all rights reserved

See the full selection here: Pendleton Spa/Beach Towels 

And wherever you take your Pendleton towels–pool, spa, lakeside, beach or backyard–have a fantastic summer!

A Pendleton Canyonland beach towel spread on a lake. A woman's lower legs and feet, clad in jeans and beautiful Manitobah moccassins, extend over green lake water that shines with pinpoints of sunlight.

Photo by Rebecca Amber for Pendleton Canada; all rights reserved

Beautiful Baskets for Mother’s Day

Handmade Rwandan baskets hanging on a wall and on a table

Baskets for Mothers’ Day

You can still get these beautiful baskets in time for Mother’s Day! They make a dramatic accent on tabletops and buffets, and there is a color for every home’s palette. Each one is hand woven by craftswomen in Rwanda using sisal fibers and sweet grass.  Perfect as a centerpiece, fruit bowl, or wall hanging, each basket comes with a weaver profile and helps lift women out of poverty.

See them all here: BASKETS AND MORE

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Another adorable tiny home with Pendleton

Apartment Therapy

We found some Pendleton touches in another tiny house, this one on Apartment Therapy. We were intrigued by this particular structure because it’s a conversion. Most tiny homes are built to be tiny (like Tam and Sean’s, featured earlier this month), but this one is a converted outbuilding–a garage, to be exact. With its loft and 250 square feet of living space, it has much of the aesthetic of a home that was built small, but it’s charmingly square. The plank walls and rustic rafters give this home a real cabin feel, and the exposed lathe-and-plaster over the bed is another charming touch.

So enjoy the feature!

All images and text by Apartment Therapy, and used with permission of Apartment Therapy. 

sketch of plans for tiny home

(source-Apartment Therapy)

A woman adjusts the sound on a stereo in her tiny home.Name: Coralie Hews
Location: Northeast Portland, Oregon
Size: 250 square feet, including loft
Years Lived In: 7 months; Rented

A couch covered in a Pendleton blanket.

A clothing rack and piece of artwork.Though she was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, Coralie Hews has always possessed a Southwestern sensibility, especially when it comes to matters of interior design. Her beloved New Mexican textiles, cacti, and earth tones have always had a prominent place in her design palette, so it’s no surprise that all of those tasteful elements come into play in her dreamy, 250-square-foot cabin.

A sleeping loft in a tiny home.

A stack of wool blankets at the foot of a bed.Because Coralie downsized from a spacious one-bedroom apartment to a much smaller, lofted, one-room garage-turned-cabin, she was forced to edit all of her furniture and decor down to only her personal must-haves; she loaned a few pieces to friends, got rid of things that she had no use for, and put some bulkier odds and ends into storage. What she was left with is a charming juxtaposition: a bohemian blend of desert-inspired textiles and ceramics with a well-loved collection of Pacific Northwest relics.

The tiny home kitchen.Coralie rents the space from Emily Christensen, the Portland-based clothing designer behind Filly and Beeek, who lives in the main house. Three years ago, Christensen turned the garage on the property into a cabin which was originally listed on Airbnb, but eventually became home to year-round renters. Coralie was lucky enough to hear about the space through a good friend who was a previous tenant and was able to settle into the cabin in the spring of this year.

Though it does take effort for Coralie to keep such a small space simultaneously functional and aesthetically pleasing (i.e., keeping the place clutter-free), it is a challenge that she gladly tackles each day. The contentment she finds in living in her cozy, tiny cabin is a worthy payoff. Thanks for sharing your lovely space with us, Coralie!

Woman standing on the ladder to her sleeping loft in a tiny home.

For virgin wool Pendleton fabrics woven in our own USA mills, see us at our Woolen Mill Store, or shop here: FABRICS

If you love the vintage Harding blanket on Coralie’s sofa, check out some of our beautiful black & white Pendleton blankets.

the door into the tiny home.

All images property of Apartment Therapy, and used with permission

Pendleton Jacquard Plates, Cups, and Tabletop Style.

Tabletop Perfection

We were so excited when we found just the way to showcase some of our jacquard patterns in these plate sets. Our Pendleton Home team had fun isolating the design elements, figuring out the most pleasing rations and repeats, choosing accent colors. These patterns really know how to liven up a tabletop.

Here’s a closer look at Hacienda, based on our Hacienda blanket.

jacquard_mug_hacienda
jacquard_plate_hacienda
jacquard_hacienda - Copy

Journey West:

jacquard_mug_journey_west
jacquard_plate_journey_west
jacquard_journey_west - Copy

Saxony Hills:

jacquard_mug_saxony_hills
jacquard_plate_saxony_hills
jacquard_saxony_hills - Copy

And everyone’s favorite pattern this year, Spider Rock:

jacquard_mug_spider_rock
jacquard_plate_spider_rock
jacquard_throw_spider_rock - Copy

COWBOYS & INDIANS

We’re especially happy to see two of the patterns in a tabletop feature in COWBOYS & INDIANS magazine.

Cowboys & Indians magazine cover

Spider Rock above, Journey West below.

Cowboys & Indians magazine photo spread featuring Pendleton tabletop

And there’s no better way to set off western tableware than one of our blankets: Spirit of the Peoples shown below.

Cowboys & Indians magazine photo spread featuring Pendleton tabletop
jacquard_spirit_ofthe_peoples - Copy

So if you’re wanting to make sure that your first morning cup of coffee reaches your lips in a mug you’ll treasure, consider ours.

Available in sets of four per pattern.

For Your Easter Bunnies.

Where are the bunnies, you ask.

Well, we have no rabbits. No rabbits, no hares, not a bunny in sight. But we do have some newly-arrived stuffed friends who could hop into anyone’s heart.

First, there’s Hamilton Bear, made of our own non-toxic and washable wool. He’s a little guy with a lot of personality.

Hamilton Bear

Then, there’s Yuji Bear in two colors; a wild and wooly fellow if there ever were one.

Yuji Bear_Both

They join the usual cast of characters that includes Chauncey Bear and Franklin Horse at pendleton-usa.com. And they’d love to be in a basket!

Have a wonderful holiday.

The Pendleton Vintage Collection Blankets

A Special Opportunity

This weekend (starting March 3rd, 2012), collectors will have a chance to purchase Pendleton’s Vintage Collection Blankets at 20% off during the Retired Blanket Sale.

These blankets were introduced in 2008 to offer the aged allure of a vintage wool blanket to boutique customers and collectors.

Poster for the Pendleton Vintage COllection

Our 2008 wholesale catalog copy described the blankets: “At first glance, these lovely blankets seems to have been discovered in the hacienda of a beloved grandmother. But they are newly woven in our own Northwest woolen mills. The blankets reflect both our reverence for Pendleton history and the wealth of design inspiration in our design archives. We have given these fresh interpretations a luxurious finish with the rich patina of age – a fitting tribute to our heritage. The stonewashed, distressed surface lends the feeling of a well-loved and well cared for heirloom. The colors are softly muted and the hand is sumptuously soft.”

What these beautiful words can’t describe is the hard work, experimentation and sheer number of blankets that went into refining the “aging” of a Pendleton Vintage Collection blanket.

“We burned through so many of them!” says Robert Christnacht, the head of the Pendleton Home Division. “We wove and finished the blankets in our mills, minus any labels. Then we sent them to an outside commercial laundry, where they were washed and shrunk down to the right dimensions. It was a huge job to get the process right, because we wanted to take out a certain amount of color and we needed the right appearance and hand. Time after time, we’d pull a load of wool mush out of the machine. We’d have to start over.”

The blankets were finally ready to go in 2008. The collection unveiled with four designs in 2008: Window Rock, Los Lunas, Gallup and Flagstaff. In 2009, Ganado joined the mix. Unlike most actual vintage Pendleton blankets, they are square-edged and carry a modern label. They are uniform in size, but the process insures that each blanket is slightly unique.

These blankets caught the eye of the press immediately and have been featured in Martha Stewart, ELLE Decor, VOGUE and many more. This collection was always intended to be limited. All five styles have been retired officially for 2012. They will go fast this weekend, so pay us a visit at pendleton-usa.com and complete your collection!

Introduced in 2008:

Window Rock Vintage Collection Blanket

Window Rock

Los Lunas Vintage COllection Blanket

Los Lunas

Gallup Vintage Collection Blanket

Gallup

Flagstaff Vintage COllection Blanket

Flagstaff

Added to production in 2009:

Ganado Vintage Collection Blanket

Ganado

Retired from production in 2012:

Made in USA label with eagle for Pendleton

Crossroads: Where it All Comes Together

Vintage Excitement

When an especially unique vintage Pendleton garment comes through our design areas, it can cause a stir. It’s like a new baby. People from other divisions come to visit, photos circulate in email, and everyone asks a lot of questions. What was it called? When was it made? And most importantly, what will we do with it?

A jacquard coat that came to the sewing room of the Men’s division was no exception. The Crossroads pattern was bold and dramatic, and the coloration was unique. Menswear decided to bring it back, so Fabric Design got to work redesigning and coloring the pattern. Womenswear and Home saw the possibilities…and that’s how a corporate jacquard is born.

Pendleton products that use the Crossrads pattern; a vest, blanket and sweater



What’s a “corporate jacquard”?

At Pendleton, a corporate jacquard is interpreted across Home, Women’s and Men’s offerings. Most items carry a hangtag that tells the pattern’s story, like this one for Crossroads:

The Crossroads design reflects First Nations teachings and the power of the four directions – the number “four” is sacred among many Native American tribes. East represents the physical body, the realm of the Warrior. West represents the heart and the path of the Visionary. North is the region of the mind and the wisdom of the Teacher. South represents the spirit, enlightenment and the realm of the Healer. Balance and harmony are achieved where the directions meet at the center of the Medicine Wheel. Crosses in this jacquard pattern symbolize the crossroads where the paths meet – the place where an individual becomes whole.

The Home offerings  are done in grey and tan with dark red accents. There is furniture and more. The blanket  is extraordinarily beautiful, and the centered cross element makes for a dramatic wool sham. The knit merino wool throw and oversized, feather-filled knit merino pillow  are new styles for Pendleton this year.

The Pendleton Corssroads blankets  and pillows

Womenswear works the contemporary Navajo-inspired trend in a traditional duster coat in a generously sized version of Crossroads. We used the same scale and color in the Riata Vest, and the pattern explodes in the knit Wildwood Wrap Cardigan.  A smaller-scale woven version in both blue/black and black/tan adds some drape and swing to the Crossroads separates; a skirt, jacket  and poncho.

Women's clothing that uses the crossroads pattern

Menswear has the pattern throughout the line, including a shawl collar cardigan, hats, mufflers, bags  (like this Weekender, coming to Pendleton-usa.com later this fall) and some outstanding outerwear.

Men's products that use the Crossroads patttern

But the true piece de resistance is the new version of the original coat . We changed the design a little, sleeked it up. It’s a piece of the past, reworked for now. This will be available at our website  starting 10/01/11.

Men's coat in crossroads pattern

Everything Crossroads can be found here with more to come as the weather gets colder…oh, wait.

You want to see the original coat?

Well here it is. It’s at least thirty years old, maybe forty. And since it’s a Pendleton, it still looks amazing.

Vintage men's coat in the Crossroads pattern by Pendleton

And that’s one beautiful baby…

Harding: A Pattern Through Time

A Sweetheart of a Pattern

In the twenties, thirties and forties, movie theaters were packed with fans of America’s Sweetheart, Mary Pickford (on the left in a fringed Harding shawl). She was the golden child of early American cinema, though her reputation took a big hit when she scandalously cut off her trademark golden braids. She didn’t just act. She produced, wrote, directed and marketed her films, and was one of the co-founders of United Artists. Sadly, the advent of talkies ended her acting career. Apparently, hearing Mary Pickford speak was something like reading the Tweets of your favorite celebrities. Sometimes, silence is golden.

Anita Page is on the right, in a coat that will look familiar to those of you who have watched The Portland Collection video. In that, designer Rachel Turk is slipping on a coat similar to Ms. Page’s.

Side by side photos from the 1920s of Mary Pickford and Anita Page, both in Pendleton Harding blanket garments.

Nothing would make us happier than to have Anita Page’s coat in our possession, so we ventured hopefully down to the archives to have a look:

Photo of a very ragged Harding blanket coat from the Pendleton archives.

Here is one of our oldest archival coats. It’s seen better days, but it’s beautifully made and still inspirational. The length and styling are close. The buttons differ, but buttons are usually replaced on vintage garments. But…Ms. Page’s coat had patch pockets, while ours has slash pockets. The sleeves on her coat are cuffed, while ours are hemmed. Oh well…we’re glad to have our own long Harding coat among the treasures in our archives.

Where did the Harding pattern come from?

In 1923, President Warren G. Harding  and his wife visited the Pacific Northwest to dedicate part of the old Oregon Trail. A presidential visit this far west (in a non-campaign year) was an occasion. The area’s tribal dignitaries, chiefs of the Cayuse and Umatilla tribes, asked Pendleton Woolen Mills to create a unique blanket as a special gift to the First Lady, Florence Harding.

President and First Lady Harding receive a Harding patterned throw from local tribal dignitaries in Oregon.

The weavers modified a Chief Joseph pattern and produced a fringed shawl in shades of white, tan, yellow and red. Mrs. Harding  graciously accepted the blanket, and by all accounts was delighted with her so-very-western gift.

First lady Florence Harding.

If you know your history, you know that Mrs. Harding didn’t always have the easiest time of it. We can only hope her warm Pendleton shawl offered a little comfort as the Harding presidency was rocked by scandal.

Despite that, what came to be known as the Harding pattern has been a steady part of the Pendleton line since the 1920s. We’ve used it in menswear, womenswear, accessories and blankets.

A bed made up with a Pendleton harding blanket.

From season to season, we dip back into Harding history for accessories and apparel. In 2009, a vintage Pendleton Westernwear ad image sparked our designer’s inspiration.

Two men in an advertising image from the 1980s. They are wearing Pendleton sweaters with Harding patterns.

We have no idea what these gentlemen are discussing so intently, or if they called each other the night before to coordinate their outfits. But the 2009 versions of these sweaters were solid hits. If you’re not sure whether you have the old version or the new, check the label. The newer versions will have the word “Pendleton” straight across, rather than at a slant. If “Pendleton” is at a slant, your sweater is vintage. And that is a seriously nice find.

Heritage is everywhere lately, with even the newest brands trying to connect with the past. At Pendleton Woolen Mills, we don’t have to borrow heritage, because we have our own. Thanks for sharing it with us for over a hundred years.

A young Native American woman accepts the gift of a fringed Pendleton shawl in the Harding pattern from a woman in the stands at the Pendleton Round-Up, circa 1920s