Iconic Pendleton Patterns: Stripes

In our last post, we talked about Shelter Bay, a pattern that combines our camp stripes with the motif from one of our most popular blankets, San Miguel (read the post here: Shelter Bay). Part of that pattern’s beauty lies in its camp striped borders.

blonde man and brunette woman seated in front of a window, wrapped in a pendleton Camp Stripe blanket. Woman is holding a cup of coffee.

photo by Cassy Berry

Pendleton’s camp stripe blankets are popular, and not just for their utilitarian history. Camp stripes bring the spirit of the outdoors to whatever they grace, thanks to colors that reflect Western landscapes: forests, lakes, river gorges, coastal crags, and the rich colors of the high desert. These stripes find their way to home goods and apparel, especially outdoor shirts and warm outerwear.  See them here: Camp Stripes

But what about our other stripes?

Serape Stripes

With their bands of contrasting colors, serape stripes are designed to dazzle.

Pendleton serape stripe blankets hanging on pegs, next to a stack of folded Pendleton serape stripe blankets

 

photo by Pendleton Woolen Mills

Traditional serapes (called sarapes south of the border) are colorful, sturdy blanket shawls that were part of life in the Mexican home. A serape could serve as a tablecloth, bedding, impromptu hammock, or improvised tent. It could be worn as a shawl, or converted to a poncho. Clothing, bedding, shelter: the serape was versatile!

When southern California’s surfers made trips to Baja, Mexico, to ride the waves, they brought home serape blankets and Baja jackets. The serape stripe became part of the “Endless Summer” of American surf culture. Pendleton’s serape stripes are found on shirts, jackets, hoodies, and bold wool blankets that are perfect for the beach, the porch, or the park.

Man standing on beach wearing striped overshirt.

photo by Danielle Visco

In the Southwestern United States, Pendleton serapes are also known as “Goopesala,” or “Good Blankets.” They are often used in the Give-Away Ceremony, performed at honor dances, weddings and many other occasions. Hosts give gifts to their guests, with no expectation of return. “What is given away returns to the giver, in another form of good.”

Archival photo from early 1900s of a Navajo family (father, mother, three young children) riding in a wagon with a Pendleton serape stripe blanket

photo: Pendleton Archives

In this photo from the Pendleton archives, a Pueblo family rides in one of the original wagons like those used by the Babbitt brothers, five shopkeepers who came west in 1886 to make their mark. They founded the CO Bar cattle ranch, in addition to opening a mercantile in Flagstaff, Arizona. In time, their success with commerce equaled their success with cattle. Over the next 100 years, the Babbitts owned and operated over twenty trading posts, doing business with the Navajo, Hopi and Apache peoples. Babbitt’s is still active and thriving—and working with Pendleton.

See our serapes here: Serape Stripe Blankets

Park Stripes

Some are bold, some are busy, but every National Park stripe blanket celebrates America’s Treasures, with a portion of sales supporting the work of the National Park Foundation.

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photo by Kyle Houck

Here are a few fun facts about Pendleton National Park blankets:

  • The oldest design, Glacier Park, originally had “points” to give it the feel of an old-time “candy stripe” blanket traded by fur trappers, but the fur trade had ceased long before Pendleton began weaving blankets.
  • Any Pendleton National Park blanket with points was made before 1938. These marks referred to blanket size, and as the blankets grew in length and width, the points became inaccurate.
  • Pendleton has made blankets for 17 different parks. Two blankets, Crater Park and Shasta, are mysteries. They are listed but not pictured in archival sales materials, and there are no surviving examples.
  • Pendleton introduced plaid National Park throws after World War II. There were four different Grand Canyon plaid throws in those days, plus a newer one introduced in 2009.
  • Part of a National Park blanket’s appeal is its striped simplicity, but some older blankets featured mountains, pine trees, flowers—even a stylized Thunderbird.

Photo taken in Glacier National Park of a man and woman in front of a glacier, wrapped in a Pendleton Glacier National Park blanket

Photo by Kristen Irey

Park stripes are not just for blankets anymore. Their bold colors and happy associations make them a natural to wear and use each and every day. Park stripes prove their versatility in farmhouses, industrial spaces, ranch homes, tiny houses, lake cabins, tents, yurts and trailers! Wherever you live, park stripes are right at home.

See them here: Park Blankets

Which stripe is your favorite?

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Shelter Bay – Where it All Comes Together

Bed with Shelter bay Pendleton blanket. Blanket is brown with navy, tan and red stripes, and large tan central cross, with smaller crossed in corners.

One of our more popular 2019 blanket introductions is Shelter Bay (see more information here: Shelter Bay).

Shelter Bay

Shelter Bay sits in the upper corner of the Pacific Northwest, where the North Fork of the Skagit River empties into Washington State’s Puget Sound. This place of teeming waters and temperate weather invites wanderers to experience the great outdoors; camping by the shore, paddling a kayak, sitting by a campfire telling stories that drift up into the starry night sky. An earthtone background lit by luminous directional crosses represents the balanced, harmonious meeting of ocean, bay, land and sky in Shelter Bay.

This blanket is a unique combination of two popular designs. The first is the motif adapted from our San Miguel blanket (click to see it here: San Miguel). We enlarged the cross, and used it on a heathered ground that’s a derived from our popular Yakima Camp Blankets (see them here: Camp blankets). These attractive utilitarian blankets were based on the ombre-striped bedrolls used by cattle hands and shepherds. During the day, they were rolled tightly and fastened to saddles or packs. At night, they were unrolled for sleeping under the stars.

two beds in a log building by a window. Beds are covered with Pendleton Yakima Camp blankets, one green with stripes, one red with stripes.

Our camp blankets were originally woven from spare mill goods, and their heathered beauty was almost accidental, as it was derived from mill waste–yarn leftovers. Now, the blankets are part of the regular mill production schedule, and are woven according to an exacting weaver’s recipe. What’s that? A recipe is a specific combinations of yarns that produces a specific textile. Everything about the yarn, down to the sheep from which it originates, factors into the final result.

Our heathered blankets are popular, and we’ve been using them as inspiration in more than just the camp blanket line. Last year, we debuted the Olympic National Park Blanket in a grey heather with stripes. Like the Camp blankets, this one is the same on both sides.

But as the upper right corner of the photo below shows you, Shelter Bay is a little fancier. It’s woven on a jacquard loom, and the reverse is tan with earth-tone crosses. This gives you two dramatically different looks in one beautiful blanket.

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Shelter Bay is more than just a beautiful bedding group. We adapted the design for an accessories group. Some of the pieces use the stripe, others use the cross, and some use both. See what’s available at our website: Shelter Bay Accessories

Pendleton bag, scar and hat sitting on a wooden table against a shiplap background.

And if that’s still not enough Shelter Bay for you, check out this beautiful cardigan sweater. It’s a lambswool blend, and has cool forearm patches.

man wearing brown pendleton cardigan standing in front of lake

See it here: Shelter Bay Cardigan

The weather has changed, and you’re ready for wool. That’s a favorite time of year around here, so we want to wish you a happy Fall from Pendleton.

 

New Child-size/Crib-size Pendleton blankets for 2019

Enjoy a look at Pendleton’s newest child-sized blankets! These soft wool blankets are made in the USA, and are perfect for crib or cuddle. They also make wonderful wall hanging (click the name of each blanket to see more information at pwndleton-usa.com ).

Shared Paths

This beautiful blanket celebrates the path walked in life, from the helpless dependence of a newborn to the self-sufficiency that comes with growing up.

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Shared Paths legend:

The Navajo word for animals, Naaldlooshii, translates as “the-ones-who-trot-people.” The Navajo study an animal’s behavior to understand and learn from it, knowing that appearances say less than actions. Buffalo is mighty and fearsome, but lives gently by grazing on plants. Fox is supple and small, but lives fiercely by hunting. From Deer to Dove, all Earth’s animals move together on Earth’s shared paths in hózhó, the Navajo state of balance and order.

 

Butterfly

This blanket originated as a robe-sized blanket in the American Indian College Fund collection. In the larger version, the pecan-brown side is the face of the blanket. For the child-sized version, we used the more colorful ombred side as the face of the blanket. Sales of both versions support the work of The College Fund, which provides scholarships to tribal colleges for deserving Native American scholars.

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Butterfly legend:

Lakota leader Sitting Bull worked tirelessly for Native American rights. Sitting Bull College on Standing Rock Reservation memorializes his efforts, and demonstrates the American Indian College Fund’s belief that education can transform the future. Sitting Bull’s legacy is honored with flower and butterfly designs similar to those on his regalia. A caterpillar’s transition to butterfly mirrors the transformative impact of education, a fitting remembrance of a man who lived life bravely for his people.

See the full-sized version of this blanket here: Butterfly

 

Morning Cradleboard by Wendy Ponca: Weavers Series

This blanket was designed by Wendy Ponca, a gifted designer and artist who has designed several blankets for Pendleton over the years. It is part of the Weavers Series, which celebrates the artistry of contemporary weavers by incorporating their one-of-a-kind designs into Pendleton blanket designs.

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Morning Cradleboard legend:

This child-sized blanket uses a pattern inspired by finger-woven straps used to secure a baby in a traditional Osage cradleboard. Ponca often creates designs that are tactical by intent, offering Nature’s protection. In Osage, the cradleboard is called o-olo-psha, or “follow-trail-of-animals.” The cradleboard was the beginning of the Road of Life as followed by animals to water and food. People take this same path, beginning life as completely dependent, and working step-by-step to self-sufficiency. As the cradleboard protects the baby, this blanket surrounds a child with warmth and safety on the path to growing up.

Big Medicine

Like the Butterfly blanket above, this blanket began its Pendleton history as a robe-sized blanket. The original Big Medicine blanket was a limited-edition custom run, and each blanket contained hair from a rare white buffalo named…Big Medicine. We wove more of the original coloration using only wool, in both the green version and this new re-color with a charcoal ground.

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Big Medicine legend:

The rare white bison occurs only once in every 10 million births. In 1933, a white buffalo was born in the wild on Flathead tribal lands. He was named “Big Medicine” to reflect his sacred power. Many Native American tribes consider the return of the white buffalo as the fulfillment of an ancient prophecy. Tradition spoke of the coming of a herd of white buffalo. The seven bison on this blanket represent the seven directions: North, South, East, West, Above, Below, and Within. Together, they symbolize wholeness for mankind and the earth. Prayer pipes signify mankind’s communication with the Creator. In the center of the blanket, four hands join within the Circle of Life, representing the joining together of the diverse people of the world and a new beginning. 

See the full-sized versions of this blanket here: Big Medicine

See all our child-sized blankets here: For Crib and Child Pendleton Blankets

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Special Gifts for Special Grads – Pendleton Blankets

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Photo by Hannah Ward Art

Life is a journey, and a graduate is setting out on an entirely new path. A Pendleton blanket makes a perfect companion on that journey; warm, soft, with made-in-the-USA quality that will last for generations. Here are a few ideas for your new grad.

Does your graduate love the great outdoors? Consider our National Park Series blankets. These striped patterns are some of our favorites, with colors that reflect the geography and flora of the parks for which they’re named. The blankets and throws have special patches, inspired by the window decals travelers were given at the gates of America’s earliest parks.

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Glacier Park, shown above, is a favorite. Size selection varies by style, but these blankets can come in twin, full, queen and a new throw size. See them here: Pendleton National Park Series blankets

For the graduate who is entering the United States Marine Corps, nothing could say “congratulations” more than the new The Few, The Proud blanket. This special design is approved by the USMC.

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The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. Each element signifies the Marine Corps mission and legacy. The anchor reflects the naval tradition of the Marines as part of the Department of the Navy. The globe represents readiness to serve in any part of the world. The bald eagle, symbol of America, holds a ribbon in its beak that reads “Semper Fidelis,” or “Always Faithful,” a reference to the unending valor and loyalty of the Corps.

See this blanket here: The Few, The Proud

For those headed to the dorms, a Pendleton Camp Blanket is a terrific choice.

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This 100% wool blanket is inspired by the bedroll blankets found on the packs and saddles of trail riders and shepherds in the American west. At night, these blankets were unrolled for a night by the campfire, under the stars. Not a bad companion for a new grad’s journey!

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There are quite a few color and size options. See them here: Camp blankets

Also available in a throw size here: Camp Throws

Some graduates begin training as an EMT and/or firefighter as soon as they are done with high school. Firefighters are a special breed, who run into the buildings that most of us run out of. If you have a graduate who will be training for this profession, consider the Wildland Heroes blanket.

Wildland_Firefighter_blanket

The scent of smoke fills the air. An orange glow lights the horizon. Mother Nature is on alert, and Wildland Firefighters stand ready to defend her. These brave men and women hold the line against fire’s destruction with team effort; digging lines, running hoses, saving structures when they can. In Pendleton’s tribute to Wildland Firefighting, bands of deep forest alternate with lines of flame, lighting trees endangered by flame. A portion of this blanket’s sales help the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, which supports families and injured firefighters in times of need.

See more information here: Wildland Heroes

And you can’t go wrong with an iconic pattern like the Chief Joseph design.

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It’s available in a color and size for everyone, including a special cherry pink that benefits N.A.R.A.’s Native women’s health program.

See all your options here: Chief Joseph Blankets

A Pendleton blanket is the gift of a lifetime. If you’re looking for a different type of gift, large or small, we have plenty of other suggestions at Pendleton-usa.com. And wherever your graduates are heading, we wish them well.

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Pendleton Weavers Series: Wendy Ponca’s Cradleboard

Wendy Ponca is a renowned Osage Indian fine artist. She studied art at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, NM, with more studies in NYC and Greece.

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(photo source)

She earned a Bachelor’s degree in Fiber Arts from the Kansas City Art institute, and a Baster’s degree in art therapy at Southwestern College of Santa Fe. She has taught fine arts at IAIA and UNLV, and worked as a costume designer for the Santa Fe Opera. She also founded Native Uprising, a collective of Native American artists, designers, and models.

Throughout Ponca’s career as an artist, designer and educator, she has designed and shown her own lines that demonstrate her skills in draping, tailoring, beadwork, jewelry, silk-screen printing, ribbon work, body and textile painting.

Perfomance+Still+Earth+and+Sky+People+Meeting

(photo source)

Her work marries traditional elements like shells and buckskin with new materials like reflective Mylar, to reflect the Earth and Sky moieties of her Osage people. Her work is exhibited in museums across the US. Her vibrant ready-to-wear clothing line is available at wendyponca.com.

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(source)

She has designed several blankets for Pendleton Woolen Mills, including a four-blanket limited edition series in 1995. Her latest is Morning Cradleboard, 2019’s addition to Pendleton’s Weavers Series.

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This child-sized blanket uses a pattern inspired by finger-woven straps used to secure a baby in a traditional Osage cradleboard. Ponca often creates designs that are tactical by intent, offering Nature’s protection. In Osage, the cradleboard is called o-olo-psha, or “follow-trail-of-animals.” The cradleboard was the beginning of the Road of Life as followed by animals to water and food. People take this same path, beginning life as completely dependent, and working step-by-step to self-sufficiency. As the cradleboard protects the baby, this blanket surrounds a child with warmth and safety on the path to growing up.

See the blanket here: Morning Cradleboard

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Bunky Echo-Hawk’s Pathway blanket for The College Fund

 

BunkyEchoHawk

Photo by Ryan Redcorn

Bunky Echo-Hawk (Pawnee/Yakama) is an internationally recognized visual and performing artist. His provocative, exuberant work is exhibited in private collections, galleries and museums throughout the world. He has done design work for non-profit organizations and tribal communities, VANS, and more. He has been designing the Nike N7 collection since 2010. He has painted murals in various tribal communities, towns, and public places, and recently installed a mural in American Airlines Arena in Miami, Florida, the home of the Miami Heat.

His design for the Pathway blanket is best described in his own words.

 

Echo-Hawk has saturated his modern design with traditional Pawnee symbology. Red, white, yellow, and black signify the four races of humankind, the four stages of life, the semi-cardinal directions, and animals, plants, and stars associated with those directions. Bands of turquoise surround the design as Sky surrounds Earth. Black and red parfleche elements from Pawnee burden straps alternate with four-pointed stars of the Milky Way, or Path of Departed Spirits. A winding path through the blanket’s center traces life’s journey.

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You can see the blanket here: Pathway 

Sales of the College Fund blankets help support the work of the American Indian College Fund by funding scholarships for Native American students. Learn more about The College Fund and its mission here: The College Fund

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Sunrise Eagle for the softest naps and night times.

Is a new baby in the future for you or someone you love? If you’re looking for an heirloom baby blanket to welcome a little one, consider Sunrise Eagle.

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This child-sized blanket is made in the USA in our Pacific Northwest mills, and features soft virgin wool, bright colors, and a stirring story about the “super eagle,” Thunderbird.

Sunrise Eagle

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Thunderbird is important to many tribes and nations. He is often a messenger and a protector who brings the power of storms and the renewal that follows. In Navajo culture, some legends say Thunderbird’s eyes are made of the sun. When Thunderbird sleeps, night comes. When Thunderbird wakes, sunrise begins. Southwest symbols for rain, sun, storms are governed by Thunderbird’s mighty wingspan and voice of thunder. He watches over the world with eyes that hold the sun.

There is also a hooded towel in this pattern, for after-bath snuggles. (see it here)

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And while you’re at it, maybe Mom and Dad want a little Sunrise Eagle of their own?

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Cardigan

Men_Tee

Men’s tee

In a towel, in a blanket, or in your arms, however you wrap them, babies are wonderful. Here’s to some sleep-filled nights for the new addition.

Retiring Pendleton Blankets for 2019

Buffalo Wilderness Fence

Every year, we retire some of our blanket designs to make room for more. This year, we have some beautiful blankets saying good-bye. You’ll find neutral geometric designs that have become so popular, like Beargrass Mountain and Santa Clara. You’ll also find the bold and colorful geometric designs for which we are so well-known, like Arrow Revival and Eagle Gift. Baby blankets, knitted throws, collaborations and so much more—take a look! Go here to see the full selection: Retiring for 2019

Below are some favorites that you won’t want to miss, all woven and manufactured in the USA in Pendleton’s Pacific Northwest mills.

Neutral Geometrics

Compass Point

This contemporary pattern also comes in a throw that features a central Greek cross. See it here: Compass Point Throw

Compass point

North, South, East, West; these are the Cardinal Directions, immortal points on the compass. In this contemporary pattern, each arm of the Greek cross reaches toward one of Earth’s Four Corners, pointing the way to wealth, knowledge and relaxation. Sailors traveled North on high waves to fish the icy waters, South to breathe the balmy air of the Tropics, East to load their ships with profitable trade goods and West to encounter new lands, new dangers, new opportunities. The compass points guide every ship’s journey, showing a path to adventure.

Santa Clara

Subtle hues that echo adobe architecture make this blanket versatile.

Santa Clara

In 1777, Franciscan padres established Santa Clara Mission in California’s fertile Santa Clara valley. It was supported through the labors of the Tamyen, Ohlone and Costanoan peoples. When the mission system ended, Santa Clara Mission continued to serve as a place of worship. The church was destroyed three times, but has always been rebuilt. In 1926, the current structure was constructed with the distinctive architecture and subtle stucco hues echoed in this design.  Today, Mission Santa Clara de Asís serves as the chapel on Santa Clara University campus.

Colorful Geometrics

Southern Highlands

This pattern has been a hit in our Baggu collaboration!

Southern Highlands

Southern Highlands celebrates the traditional craft of wool coverlet weaving as practiced by the women of the Appalachian region of the Southeastern United States. Appalachians settled in remote hills and valleys, and survived by hunting, gathering and small-scale agriculture. Their rustic cabins were filled with objects made from materials at hand.  For coverlets, women grew flax and cotton on the same property where sheep were raised for wool. Hand-carded and spun, with dyestuffs derived from walnut shells, indigo and other colored flora, coverlets were hand-loomed in the four-harness overshot method. Traditional colors were blue, red and green, woven on a white or cream warp. Patterns range from circles to intricate geometric eye-dazzlers. The woven coverlet inspired great artistry in Appalachian weavers. Today, their work is admired and preserved in museums and collections across the country.

Hacienda

It’s hard to say farewell to this one; Hacienda is a popular blanket that has been in the line for a decade.

hacienda

Timeless geometric shapes give universal appeal to the nine-element design in this USA-made wool blanket. The stripes, crosses, triangles and diamond motifs in this pattern are interpretations of the symbols common in many early Navajo blankets. Crosses represent completeness and the four directions: North, West, South and East. Arrows signify movement, power and life force. Like traditional Navajo designs, this pattern continues to the edges of the blanket to prevent evil spirits from being trapped within.

Pictorial Blankets

Buffalo Wilderness

The great Plains Bison is the star of this blanket, one of many we’ve woven to celebrate the buffalo. You can see more retired examples here: Buffalo blankets

Buffalo Wilderness

This design honors a time when millions of bison roamed North America’s grassy plains. Today our National Parks protect the last remaining wild herds. One of the largest herds of free-ranging wild buffalo lives in Yellowstone National Park. It’ thought to be the only place in the United States where bison have lived continuously since prehistoric times. You can also see herds in Badlands, Grand Teton, Theodore Roosevelt and Wind Cave National Parks.

Full Moon Lodge

This design plays on the luminous combination of blue and orange. Learn more about the artist behind the blanket here: Starr Hardridge

Full Moon Lodge

A USA-made wool blanket created in partnership with artist Starr Hardridge. This design illustrates the relationship between humankind, Mother Nature and the creator of the universe whose medicine is love. It acknowledges our place between the sun and the full moon. Part of our Legendary Collection, this design honors stories and symbols of Native American cultures.

So get them while they’re here—they are saying good-bye soon!

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Photo by Kristen Frasca

http://www.kristenfrasca.com/

https://www.instagram.com/kristenfrasca/

 

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New for Spring 2019 – Spirit Seeker

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Another beautiful blanket for Spring 2018 has arrived at the website!

Spirit Seeker

The Spirit Seeker blanket is predominantly woven in indigo and cream. Accent colors of lime green, orange and fuchsia are used sparingly in complex bands of arrows and flowers. It’s a beautiful arrangement of line and color!

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The blanket’s reverse lets the accent colors shine.

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Spirit Seeker:

The quest for knowledge leads the spiritual seeker on many paths. In Australia, bush people go on ritual wanderings known as walkabouts. The Babongo people of Africa have a rebirthing ritual that includes a journey to find spiritual truth.  Native Americans from many different tribes go on vision quests, rites of passage that include fasting, prayer, and a solitary journey to find life’s purpose. Spirit Seeker celebrates Spirit Seekers and their journeys with multi-directional arrows bordering a medallion, the central truth reached by multiple paths.

Perfect for Spring, perfectly Pendleton.

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New for Spring 2019 – Pagosa Springs Blanket

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Our newest blankets are arriving at the website, and you’re going to love them; Pagosa Springs is a beauty.

Pagosa Springs

hot springs

Pagosa Springs is woven in turquoise and earth tones inspired by hot springs all over the world, like the Grand Prismatic Spring here in the USA.

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The reverse has a light ground, for completely different look. That can be one of the beautiful benefits of jacquard loom weaving.

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Pagosa Springs:

Long ago, the Southern Utes of Colorado told of a plague that medicine men could not cure. A council gathered on the riverbank and built a gigantic fire, danced and prayed for help, then fell into a deep sleep. When they woke, the fire was replaced by a pool of fragrant hot water. They bathed and were healed by the springs, naming it “Pah” (water) and “Gosa” (boiling). In the center of this design, blue hot springs rise through a medallion of fire to bring peace and health.

Pagosa Hot Springs is the world’s deepest geothermal hot spring.  Check it out here: Pagosa Hot Springs

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Spring is a beautiful time for Pendleton.

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