Introducing the Olympic National Park Blanket!

A New Park Blanket

Pendleton is proud to unveil our latest national park blanket, celebrating Washington state’s Olympic National Park. See it here: Olympic National Park Blanket

Bed-shot-Olympic

The colors of this blanket pay homage to the Olympic National Park in our neighboring Washington State. This unique region is famous for its varied ecosystems—from rugged coastlines and dense old-growth forests to glacier-capped alpine peaks and lush rainforests.

THe Olympic National Park blanket, by Pendleton, next to a closeup of the blanket's lable, which features a drawing of a Roosevelt elk silhouetted by Ruby Beach, with wildflowers in the foreground.

This very special design uses a ground of heather grey with two bands of stripes in muted, natural tones. Fans of our national park blankets can attest to the fact that we don’t usually use heathered yarns in this group, making this blanket uniquely beautiful, just like the park for which it’s named.

The Park

1200px-Cedar_Creek_Abbey_Island_Ruby_Beach

…Diversity is the hallmark of Olympic National Park. Encompassing nearly a million acres, the park protects a vast wilderness, thousands of years of human history, and several distinctly different ecosystems, including glacier-capped mountains, old-growth temperate rain forests, and over 70 miles of wild coastline. https://www.nps.gov/olym/index.htm

Rainforests

Visitors to the Pacific Northwest are often surprised to learn about our rainforests. The entire area was once home to a huge rainforest that stretched from Oregon’s southern coast to southeastern Alaska. Why? Because of our bountiful, wonderful (and sometimes depressing) level of rainfall.

The Olympic National Forest receives 12 to 14 feet of rain per year, with temperatures that rarely dip below freezing or rise above 80 degrees. These temperate, damp conditions allow rain forests to thrive, nourishing an array of vegetation: mosses, ferns, Douglas fir, red alders, Western hemlocks and Sitka spruce. As in all rain forests, downed trees become “nurse logs,” fertile places where seeds grow, animals nest and insects burrow.

Hoh_rainforest

Olympic National Park is home to four rain forests; Hoh, Quinault, Queets and Bogchiel. Quinault Rain Forest is home to the world’s largest Sitka spruce. This tree is more than 1,000 years old, 191-feet-high with a 96-foot spread. Aside from the Redwoods of California, Quinalt holds the largest trees in America—and, a gorgeous lake! Read more about a wooden boat  trip to Lake Quinalt by our friend Greg Hatten here: Lake Quinalt.

Mountains

The Olympic Mountains are part of the Pacific Coast Ranges. They’re not especially high – Mount Olympus is the highest at 7,962 ft (2,427 m)–but its eastern slopes rise out of Puget Sound from sea level, making for a towering ascent. The range’s western slopes are the wettest place in the 48 states thanks to—you guessed it—rain! That 12 to 14 feet of rain we mentioned earlier.

Hurricane_Ridge

Hurricane Ridge, at a mile above sea level, offers an unmatched view of the Olympic Mountains. You can observe right there, or take off on hiking trails. You can even take an off-road ready rig up two narrow dirt roads–Obstruction Point or Deer Park—to take in some incredible views of snow-capped mountains.

Beaches

As part of its varied landscape, Olympic NP contains a 73-mile long stretch of wilderness coast. The rocky headlands, beaches, tidepools and sea stacks are wild and undeveloped. Ruby Beach—named for ruby-like crystals that are found in deposits of the beach’s sand–has been attracting artists and photographers for decades, thanks to its unique sea stacks.

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By Adbar – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27301905

Wildlife

We love our animals out here, and Olympic NP is full of them. Old growth preserves provide unique and safe habitat for several endangered species, including the northern spotted owl. Birdwatching in the park is popular, with over 250 species of birds. The mountain meadows draw blue grouse, woodpeckers, gray jays, and more. At the coast, keep your eyes peeled for bald eagles.

On land, several species are found only in the Olympic forests: The Olympic marmot, Olympic snow mole and Olympic torrent salamander. Cougars, bobcats and bears are just a few of the carnivores that roam and hunt these forests. For a full list, see here: https://www.nps.gov/olym/learn/nature/mammal-species-list.htm And don’t forget the ocean. Offshore, the waters that wash the beaches of Olympic NP are home to whales, dolphins, sea lions, seals, and sea otters.

olympic-national-park-bobcat

Other things to remember about visiting the area:

  • The Olympic peninsula was once one of the PNW’s best-kept secrets until a certain book series ignited interest in the area. If that’s your jam, Forks is VERY close to the park, as are La Push and Port Angeles.
  • If you would like to set foot on the westernmost  point of the contiguous 48 states, you can do it at Cape Alava, Washington (48.16974° N, 124.73004° W) during low tide, by walking out to the west side of Tskawahyah Island. Cape Alava is accessible via a 3-mile boardwalk hike from a ranger station in the park.
  • Dogs are not allowed in most of our national parks. But Olympic has dog-friendly trails where you can hike with your pooch, as long as you follow a few rules. Read more here: pets in Olympic National Park

So snuggle up in the made-in-the-USA warmth of the Olympic National Park blanket and start planning your visit. The Pacific Northwest wonderland awaits.

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Happy Birthday Teddy Roosevelt

The Teddy Bear

In honor of Teddy Roosevelt’s birthday, we are taking a look back at the origins of one of the world’s favorite toys; the Teddy Bear, a quiet and cuddly friend to children for generations. But do you know where the Teddy Bear got his name?

Teddy Roosevelt

President Theodore Roosevelt was invited to go bear hunting in November of 1902 by Mississippi Governor Andrew H. Longino. The hunting party hunted in the woods near Onward, Mississippi. When the President, a noted sportsman and accomplished big game hunter, had not located a bear, the hunting party decided to take matters in hand. His assistants cornered a black bear and tied it to a tree. All President Roosevelt had to do was fire a single shot to bag his trophy. But Teddy Roosevelt was offended by the lack of sportsmanship in this enterprise, and refused to take his shot.

Of course, the public loved this story.

The Cartoon

Teddy Roosevelt was a dashing figure, well known for his years as a Rough Rider. His romantic writings about the American wilderness helped to inspire the creation of our system of National Parks. His steadfast insistence on sportsmanship on the hunt inspired newspaper articles and a famous cartoon by cartoonist Clifford Berryman.

A cartoon showing Teddy Roosevelt refusing to take a shot at a

According to history.com, what came next was a national toy craze:

Inspired by the cartoon, Brooklyn, New York, shopkeeper Morris Michtom and his wife Rose made a stuffed fabric bear in honor of America’s 26th commander-in-chief and displayed it with a sign, “Teddy’s bear,” in their store window, where it attracted interest from customers. After reportedly writing to the president and getting permission to use his name for their creation, the Michtoms went on to start a successful company that manufactured teddy bears and other toys.

The original Teddy bear

source

Meanwhile, around the same time the Michtoms developed their bear, a German company founded in 1880 by seamstress Margarete Steiff to produce soft toy animals began making a plush bruin of its own. Designed in 1902 by Steiff’s nephew Richard, who modeled it after real-life bears he’d sketched at the zoo, the mohair bear with jointed limbs debuted at a German toy fair in 1903. ()

“Teddy’s bears” were an immediate and enduring hit with children.

A collage of old photos of children holding

They even inspired their own book series about the Roosevelt Bears! Author Seymour Eaton expounded on the international adventures of two bear cubs. Read about these books and see their absolutely charming illustrations here: Roosevelt Bears

RooseveltBearsFrontPage

Pendleton Bears

Teddy bears remain one of the world’s favorite toys, and here at Pendleton, we have our own favorites. Our Teddys are National Park Teddys, to honor the president and the parks he helped inspire. We currently have bears for Grand Canyon and Badlands parks.

Pendleton teddy bears wearing hats and carves with National Park Stirpes.

 

We love their park-stripe hats and mufflers, their huggable tummies, but most of all we love their floppy feet. You can learn more about our bears here: Pendleton Teddy Bears

And happy birthday to the old Rough Rider himself!

New Parks, New Cans – Pendleton and ROGUE ALES

Four cans of Rogue IPA on a Pendleton Chief Joseph blanket

Summer Brews

This summer is a fantastic time to celebrate your favorite National Park with Pendleton Pale Ale – now available in Crater Lake, Rainier, Grand Canyon and Yosemite park cans!

Wooden aging barrels with "Rogue" on them.

Our friends at Rogue have outdone themselves with this delicious brew.

Five cans of Rogue IPA on a Rainier National Park blanket.

America’s Treasures

So the next time you’re headed out for a picnic on your favorite national Park blanket, take along a crisp pale ale and raise a toast to America’s Treasures!

A six pack of Rogue IPA on a Crater Lake national park blanket.

Cheers!

Poets Laureate of the National Parks on Tour

The Poets laureate of Anerica's National parks pose with a Pendleton Badlands blanket at the Badlands in North Dakota.Karla K. Morton and Alan Birkelbach

Ed. note: Today’s post is a special feature in honor of National Park Week. We have had the pleasure of working with Karla K. Morton and Alan Birkelbach, two Texas Poets Laureate who are currently on a Poets Laureate National Parks Tour.  Karla took the time to answer our questions, and even shared some poetry. Enjoy!

The Interview

  1. What does it mean to be Poet Laureate?

Both Alan Birkelbach and I have the great honour of being named Texas Poets Laureate, a lifetime title.  Alan was named in 2005 and I was named in 2010. A Poet Laureate is the highest rank you can go in a state as a poet, and almost every state in the US has one.   Here in Texas, there is no pay, no set criteria, so we do what moves us.  This Poets Laureate National Parks Tour is truly what moves me and Alan.  We are poets of nature.  Our work holds a great sense of place.  And above all, we are passionate when it comes to preserving such beauty.

  1. How did you become Poets Laureate/Poet Laureates?

In Texas, there is a call for nominations every two years (since that’s when the Texas Legislature meets).  All the nominations are sent to the Texas Commission on the Arts.  Those that meet the TCA’s long list of requirements are invited to submit their portfolio/resume/list of works.  Out of that great list of people, the TCA narrows it down to a group of up to ten.  Then, the names go to a group of people educated in literature around the state who make the final decisions.  Those judges are kept anonymous to keep the politics away!  So, as you can see, just being nominated in Texas is a great honour, but to be selected is truly a dream come true. 

Karla Morton poses on a mountain in the Badlands with her Badlands National park blanket.

  1. Please tell us more about your Words of Preservation: Poets Laureate National Parks Tour.

I first learned about the upcoming 100th Birthday of the National Parks in 2013.  I knew I had to do something to celebrate.  Knowing there had not been adventurer writers dedicated to the Parks since the days of John Muir and Thoreau, I came up with the idea of visiting at least 50 of the 59 Parks, writing poetry, taking pictures and putting them in a book, with a percentage of the sales of that book to go back to the Park System.  I asked Alan Birkelbach to join me to increase the historic significance of the project – to have the works from not one, but two Poets Laureate!

He immediately agreed to do this with me!  Already, the result is wonderful – to witness and take part in this wonder, and see it reflected in two different ways.  This is the magic of poetry and the magic of nature – everyone who experiences it takes from it what they need.

Karla Morton

  1. The National Park Foundation has been encouraging people to #findyourpark  throughout their centennial celebration.  What are your personal Parks and why?

 We had to begin our Tour with Yellowstone, since that was the first official Park designated, but we both have a hard time choosing favorites.

I feel drawn to the magic of Yellowstone, the silence of Joshua Tree and the intimacy of the Guadalupe Mountains.

Alan is still in a state of wonder about Yellowstone, especially Lamar Valley, and a part of him is still trying to ponder the mysteries of Mesa Verde.

  1. Can you tell us a little bit about your background? Literary, education, anything of interest.

I studied Journalism from Texas A&M University, which is a good profession, especially for poets, since every word counts, but I have always written poetry.  I have to write.  I am pulled to it in inexplicable ways.  Being named Poet Laureate of Texas is one of my greatest honors.  It allows me to be the ambassador of the written word in ways I have always dreamed.

Alan started writing poetry when he was twelve.  He says his biggest regret is that he started so late!  He started writing more seriously in the late 70’s and received his degree in English from North Texas State University (now called University of North Texas).  He personally knew some of the earlier Texas Poets Laureate and is still honored that he gets to share that title.

  1. May we please have poems?

Yes!  Here are our most recent poems inspired from Guadalupe Mountain NP:

Karla Morton reads a poem in the great outsdoors

Guadalupe Mountain

What words are grand enough to speak of light –

the itch of orange, the streaking winks of pink?

Sun-shone hours turn belly-up, toward night

Good Day, Good Day is all that we can think.

Our legs a’tremble, muscles beastly sore,

a quest to know each vista, scene and swell.

Our soul’s now been imprinted evermore

and become something greater than ourselves.

These moments groom the core of who we are.

How could we come and not be wholly changed?

We’re mountain, wolf, and now, the evening star –

every atom of our hearts rearranged.

We came here knowing not what this might bring.

We leave in awe; we leave with everything.

karla k. morton, 2010 Texas State Poet Laureate

 

___________

Alan Birkelbach reads a poem in the great outdoors.  

1 a.m. Guadalupe Mountain 

Short-visioned men still think there is

a silent line that separates all things.

But I have seen the full moon strike the calcite

in the Guadalupe walls, heard

the horned owl sing a tufted dirge,

the small fox bark, the quails flutter, the pinions

sigh with green caressing wind, the crunch

of stones beneath my deep night boots.

I learned it then. I know it now.

There is a timbre here, a larger song. No lines.

One world. Full of music. One choir. One song.

–Alan Birkelbach,  2005 Texas State Poet Laureate 

————

  1. Where can people find out more about the two of you?  

Alan and I both have eleven published works each, many of which can be found online or at bookstores/Amazon/Barnes and Noble, etc.

Here is a facebook link: www.facebook.com/karlakmorton

and a website page: http://www.texaspoetlaureate.com/tour.html

that people may follow us along!

Also, we have just started a blog: Poets Park Tour

  1. Anything else you’d like to share?

We would just like to say that these lands, while under the preservation of the government, still need champions, still need those who are willing to give their time and hearts to make sure they continue to be protected.

Like Homer recounting the journey of Odysseus, we long to be the eyes and ears for the home-bound, to bring our tales back to the hearth.

We are certainly not the first artists who believe inspiration can come through great natural beauty, who have fallen in love with the grandeur of our National Parks, but we want to take it one step further and try to do something incredible – to infuse that beauty into the written word – the eternal language of poetry.

Read more!

Lone Star Literary: Interview with Karla K. Morton

Carlsbad, NM newspaper: Texas Poets Laureate Visit Guadalupe Mountains

Western Writers of America Roundup Magazine: Feature

All photos above by Karla K. Morton, used with permission.

And of course, if you’re interested in the Badlands blanket, remember that a portion of your purchase helps to support preservation of your national parks through our National Park Service.  See it here: Badlands Blanket

National Park Week graphic designed by the USPS, with four people sitting on a mountaintop and the words "National Park Wee, Celebrate national park Week April 15-23rd" and logos for the National Park Foundation

Greg Hatten and the Great Outdoors: Moved by the Wallowas.

An icy Wallowa River.

National Park Week

Ed. Note: It’s National Park Week, and in the spirit of outdoor adventures, we’re sharing excerpts from a post by our friend Greg Hatten of Wooden Boat Adventures fame. He  took a trip into the snowy Wallowa Mountains this spring (or what’s passing for spring here in Oregon), and experienced nowcats, fly-fishing, Pendleton blankets, hot beverages and lobster tails. Read on below.

Greg’s Wallowas Story

Six hundred pounds of Oregon Elk thundered up the small freestone creek in a desperate dash for life as a pack of gray wolves gave chase. In a final powerful move to avoid the wolves at her heels, she wheeled left and attempted to jump up the six foot bank from the bottom of the creek bed. Her fate was sealed when her front legs sunk to her shoulders in four feet of deep snow. The trailing wolves, running lightly on a thin layer of crust, caught her quickly and ended the struggle for life at the top of the bank in a flurry of fangs and flesh.

Snow prints told the story.

Snowcats on the trail in the Wallowa Range.

It was a solemn moment in the middle of a remote area that had taken us several hours and a variety of vehicles to reach. Our destination was a cabin by the river…We reached the little cabin, started a fire, unloaded gear, and propped our wet boots by the stove to dry out.

Boots dring by the woodstove with a Pendleton Buffalo Creation coffee mug in the foreground.

Clearly this was going to be a steelhead trip to remember… but the Pendleton Whisky after dinner would challenge us to recall the details.

The Next Morning…

… was clear and crisp. I slipped on my waders, slipped out the cabin door and hiked to the pools upstream.

Wadrers, a wool shirt, and a Pendleton blanket on the front porch of a cabin.

We fished hard all day – upstream, downstream, swinging, nymphing, plunking….. we tried it all with the same result. A fishless day – not at all uncommon or unfamiliar to steelhead fishermen…. and so, we headed to the cabin for ribs and lobster.

After another elegant dinner I grabbed my Therm-a-Rest cot, my sleeping bag, and my Pendleton blanket and headed for the river to do some open air winter sleeping down by the river.

Greg Hatten sits on the banks of the Wallowa River, sipping a warm drink.

I explained it as a field test for winter gear – but I really wanted a closer connection to the river, the valley and the Nez Perce tribe of Native Americans that called this place “home” more than two hundred and fifty years before us. I looked up at the stars in the night sky and thought of them in this place.

Snowy riverbanks, and a cold river.

My breath was heavy and my nose was cold but the familiar sound of running water over rocks and the rawness of the night was something I’ll never forget. The image of the slaughtered Elk was something else I’ll never forget and a few times during the night imagined I was being surrounded by the Minam pack of wolves that patrols this valley and did my best to snore loudly hoping to be mistaken for a hibernating bear. When I woke to the first light of dawn, I was pretty glad I hadn’t been eaten by wolves and figured either they thought I was a sleeping bear, a mad dog, or a middle aged fly fisherman that wouldn’t taste very good…. or maybe the wolf pack was only in my dreams. I hiked up to the cabin and made coffee.

A bright fire in the woodstove.

A plaid wool Pendleton shirt hangs on a pole near a snowy riverbank.

Catch of the day; a nice trout displayed by a fisherman.

…it was time to pack up and leave the valley. We made our way back up the steep narrow trail and near the top we stopped for one final look down at the river snaking it’s way between the mountains of the Eagle Cap Wilderness.

History

In 1877, 800 members of the Nez Perce tribe and their 2,000 horses fled the valley and headed Northeast in a desperate attempt to elude the pursuers hot on their trail. They were searching for a new home and chased by the U.S. army for over 1,000 miles and three months across Idaho and parts of Montana before a final bloody battle less than 40 miles from the safety of Canada. It was the battle in the foothills of the Bear’s Paw Mountains where the Nez Perce were finally forced to surrender and Chief Joseph is said to have pronounced to the remaining Chiefs and the U.S. Army “Hear me, my chiefs! I am tired. My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever.”

A Chief Joseph blanket hangs on a tree by a riverbank.

As I looked over the raw beauty of the Wallowa valley with the steep dark green Mountains on all sides dusted with a fine layer of white snow tumbling into the river below, his words took on a depth that made me ache for his people and the way of life they gave up. I was moved by the Wallowas.

Icy riverbanks, frosty vegetation.

Read the full post here: Moved by the Wallowas

All photography courtesy Greg Hatten

A khaki color Chief Joseph blanket by Pendleton.

See product here:

Chief Joseph blanket (tan)

Pendleton Buffalo Creation mug

Men’s wool shirts by Pendleton

Win a Pendleton Park blanket on Instagram and #findyourpark for #nationalparkweek

Promo image for National Park Week shows three people sitting on a mountaintop, with the words "National park Week, Celebrate National park Week April 15-23" and National Park Foundation logos.

Next week is National Park Week.

To celebrate, many national parks are offering two–that’s TWO–free entry weekends. This means you can #findyourpark for free on Aril 15th and 16th, and again on April 20th and 23rd. How exciting is that?

National Park Week is part of the work of our National Park Foundation, the organization that takes care of our parks and monuments for the generations to come.

An infographic that discusses the events for the 2016 centennial of the National Park Foundation.

Giveaways

We are celebrating the Foundation’s hard work with an Instagram giveaway of three–that’s THREE–Pendleton National Park stripe blankets.

Three winners will have their choice of any traditional park stripe blanket representing one of our our #pendle10parks.

You can see all the blankets at home in their parks in the video below. Which one speaks to your heart?

To recap, that’s one National Park Week, two free-entry National Park weekends, and three lucky winners of Pendleton National Park blankets. Got it? Whew!

So head over to Instagram to enter, and then head to the woods! Your parks are calling.

Hiking boots worn by a person hiking in a meadow with purple wildflowers.

Rules below:

Continue reading

Herreshoff Design, Pendleton Patterns

Editor’s note

We love getting letters from our friends. Today’s is from Terry, who was an account manager for Pendleton for decades. Now retired, he’s living the good life in Montana. And that includes spending a lot of time in this gorgeous boat.

Here is Terry’s letter.

Terry's canoe

Hi Friends,

I was a Pendleton Salesman for 40 years. During that time I was always enamored with the Native American part of our company’s history, how in the late 1890s, Pendleton Woolen Mills started weaving those intricate patterns into blankets that became the impeccable standard for trade with Native Americans.

I met Greg Morley, who owns Morley Cedar Canoes at Swan Lake, Montana, in 1996 .  He crafted a canoe for me at that time, and I have become very close friends with the family since. Greg Morley worked at the Forest Service out of Salem, Oregon, in the late 60s. Before leaving to build canoes in Swan Lake, Greg was designated to source the Oregon Trail. It took him two years, but he tracked and documented it. He brings that same precision to boat building.

Steve, Greg’s son, has carried on the trade, and built this Herreshoff Design row boat for me. He invited me up to pick out each individual cedar strip for the boat. I brought one of my Pendleton blankets along, and he inlaid the pattern right into the boat. It is a banded Robe from 1920s. You can find the blanket in The Language of the Robe by Robert W. Kapoun on page 53.

Interior of the canoe, showing Pendleton-inspired patterns inlaid on the benches.

Here is a moody shot of the boat on gorgeous Swan Lake, the Gateway to Glacier National Park.

CANOE AND OARS AT THE SHORE OF A LAKE

All the best,

Terry

Credits

All photos by Terry Ball, used with permission.

See our inspiring blankets here: SHOP BLANKETS

And enjoy your weekend.

Made in USA label with eagle for Pendleton

Thank you, Everyone: Your Gift to the National Parks.

Thank you for your support!

Throughout 2016, we have been donating a portion of the proceeds from all our National Park Collection merchandise to the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks, to help support restoration and preservation of two historic national park landmarks. All of our National Park Collection collaboration partners have donated as well. This means that with  every purchase you’ve made, you’ve also made a donation!

“Every single dollar that was donated through your purchases makes a big difference for these incredible gems in our national parks and the people who visit them,” said Susan Newton, Senior Vice President of Grants and Programs at the National Park Foundation. “Ensuring that our national parks and historic sites are preserved well into the future is a responsibility that we proudly share with you, and we are grateful to partners like Pendleton for supporting this goal.”

Projects in Process

Take a look at the two projects you’re helping to make possible:

Fountain and spiral stair at Lake Level of Many Glacier Hotel. Courtesy Glacier National Park

Many Glacier Hotel, Glacier National Park 

Many Glacier, a beautiful Swiss style lodge nestled in an unparalleled mountain panorama in Glacier National Park, is often called the most photogenic of the great National Park Lodges. Pendleton’s contribution is supporting the restoration of the historic lobby of the Many Glacier Hotel, including rebuilding of the helical stairway.

Many Glacier Hotel’s helical stairs were completed in 1917 as the hotel’s showpiece. The grand helix-shaped staircase led to a magnificent upper-floor lake view, but was removed in the 1950s, along with historic lighting fixtures. The removal of the staircase and lighting fixtures led to the gradual degradation of the historic character of this renowned National Historic Landmark.

Nikki Eisinger, Director of Development, Glacier National Park Conservancy, said of the project, “Many Glacier reflects majestically over Swiftcurrent Lake and is often referred to as ‘The Lady’ in our park.  To recreate the historic look and feel of The Lady has been an incredible undertaking. We are so grateful for the support to make these renovations possible.  When the replica of her original iconic helical stairway is installed this spring, and the lobby restoration is complete, we will have truly done this architectural gem a huge historic favor, having restored her to her original grandeur.”

VIntage photo of the Grand Canyon depot.

Grand Canyon Train Depot, Grand Canyon National Park

The Grand Canyon Train Depot in Grand Canyon Village is one of the park’s “front doors,” serving as a major arrival point for thousands of visitors each year and used as a meeting place for adventurers for over 100 years. This National Historic Landmark is one of the park’s most-photographed man made structures. Pendleton’s contributions are helping improve accessibility and preserve the character of this popular landmark for the future.

“The depot is currently open and currently operated by Grand Canyon Railroad,” said Craig Chenevert of Grand Canyon National Park. “The project is quite extensive, and with support from Pendleton we will begin the process to update the depot’s Historic Structure Report. This document will include an updated and prioritized treatment plan that will inform the sequence of future work.”

Progress! It’s thanks to you.

And the helical stairs? Well, just look!

Interior hshot of the Many Glacier Hotel helical stair site, in construction.The Many Glacier Hotel Lobby is being returned to its original and curious decor. Louis Hill’s vision of an East-meets-West style, with Japanese lanterns and log lodge architecture, designed to lure tourists to experience Glacier National Park via the Great Northern Express, will be re-created.

A shot from the interior balcony of the Many Glacier Hotel mezzanine, showing the original footprint of the Helical Stairs on the wooden floor.This photo shows where the floor of the Lobby was filled in over 50 years ago after the removal of the original double helix staircase. By the opening of the hotel next June, the staircase replica will be installed in this spot, and the lobby will be more like it appeared for the first half of The Lady’s life.

It’s really something to see that old footprint for the stairs revealed, isn’t it? A piece of history that will soon be functional and fantastic.

Photo Credit: Glacier National Park Conservancy

National Parks Memories: Babies

National Park Memories

We are closing out this fantastic year of celebration with some more National Park memories. These two memories come from Pendleton employees.

The Grand Tantrum

Erin is one of our designers. She has this to say about this photo:

Although I don’t remember this, it is a popular story at family get gatherings. This is a picture of me at the Grand Canyon with my mother (Nancy) and aunt (JoAnn). I am recovering from a massive tantrum because my mother would not release me from her toddler hiking backpack. I really wanted to cross the guard rail to get a better look at the Grand Canyon! Obviously my request was not met and I went into a hysterical crying tantrum.

A 1980s photo of two women and a crying toddler at the Grand Canyon

Mt. Hood Moms

And, for our last post of the year, here’s a classic shot given to us by Robin, who is head of our bricks-and-mortar stores division:

Timberline Lodge on Mount Hood:  The year was 1957, I was 4.5 years old.  I was visiting my West coast grandparents from New York with my New York City grandmother, Rose Raskin in the Pendleton 49’er jacket, my mother, Mary Bonetta,  and little sister Hillary, age 2. I recall only the gift shop, where I was to receive a totem pole.  Who knew then I would work for Pendleton 45+ years later.  Wish I had that 49’er jacket!

A 1957 photo of a family at Mt. Hood's lodge

Two wonderful memories, two fabulous photos and two babies for the New Year.

Happy New Year from Pendleton Woolen Mills!

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