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Posts from the ‘miscellaneous’ Category

Volunteer Profile: Russ Gibbs for Mount Rainier National Park

Mount_Rainier_from_the_Silver_Queen_PeakOur National Parks are protected and enriched by a small army of volunteers whose time, enthusiasm and energy are put to use in so many ways. During this centennial year of the National Park Service, we would like to recognize the efforts of some of the people who help protect America’s Treasures. Today, thanks to the words of Ian Harvey, Volunteer Ambassador at Mount Rainier National Park,  we’re going to learn about a dedicated volunteer by the name of Russ Gibbs.

Russ Gibbs has been a dedicated volunteer at Mount Rainier National Park for the past fifteen years, sharing over 10,000 hours with countless individuals in every aspect of Park operations. Beginning with a spark from a conversation with a Ranger, Russ went from patrolling a seasonally closed section of the park every now and then to being one of the greatest constants in the park’s wildlife monitoring program.

The largest volcano in the Cascade Range in Washington, Mount Rainier is surrounded with thousands upon thousands of acres of lush subalpine meadows, monstrous old growth forests, and glacial tarns. With 97% of the park being a Designated Wilderness Area, that allows for a safe haven for many creatures. If a visitor is lucky, they may come across an animal or two during their visit to the Mountain, but for Russ, seeing an endangered species like the Northern spotted owl is just another day at the office.

Much of Russ’s work is with the Division of Natural and Cultural Resources at Mount Rainier. It’s a measure of Russ’s dependability that he was welcomed into programs that work so closely with endangered species. In addition to spotted owls, Russ works alongside Park wildlife technicians and biologists in surveys and studies of pika, harlequin ducks, and many species of amphibians. In fact, Russ’s role in our many programs has grown to be so significant that he is now a senior member of our crews.


Every year, Russ contributes over 600 hours of service, not only with wildlife surveys, but also through backcountry patrols. These patrols have benefited the park tremendously by providing officials information on flooded buildings, broken gate locks, and heavy snow loading, as well as allowing for a presence in areas that may otherwise go unmonitored during the seemingly endless winters.


Due to funding restraints Park Service-wide, some crucial positions would go unfilled year after year, if it weren’t for the help of volunteers. Since 2005, Russ has been serving a very important role in the spotted owl survey crew in the park. With these surveys, as well as his many numerous others, Russ has collected data that has vastly expanded our knowledge of the residents of our park, and we are years ahead of where we would be without these contributions.

Thanks to Ian Harvey for telling us about the park, and Russ’s work there. We thank him sincerely for his dedication and commitment. Over 2 million visitors come to Mount Rainier National Park each year, and 10,000 of them attempt to reach the summit of the park’s namesake. The work of volunteers like Russ Gibbs is absolutely essential in the operation and preservation of this wonderful western wilderness.


Pendleton Parks Collection

Happy National Pet Day!

Because you love them…




And they love you…



Because they are always ready to go…





Because they are the first to give you a lick…

or a look…

#Dog naps with #Pendleton. #pendledog #woof #pendletonblankets regram from @collabfashion

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on


or a laugh…

What a perrrfect Sunday. #meow #cat #catsofinstagram #lazysunday #Sunday #pendletonblankets #pendleton #decorate #catnap @aaylamae

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on




…and now for a moment of #zen. #pendledog #woof #Pendleton #pendletontowels #color #dog #swimming #sleepy @thiswildidea

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on



Or a lift!


We are happy to celebrate National Pet Day with you here at Pendleton.

Little dog living large. #pendletonpet #terrier #bedtime #dogsofinstagram #pup

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on



Thanks to all our Pendleton petbassadors and instagram friends who have shared their wonderful pets with us.

Shop: Pendleton Pet

Morning in Acadia National Park

Bring your Pendleton blanket and find a spot while it’s still dark. Watch the sky turn from black to deep blue as you listen to the calls of waking birds. Hear the rustle of ocean air as it raises waves to lap against the shoreline and skims through the forests of this peaceful paradise. Look to the distance, where the sky meets the Atlantic, and wait for the first rosy rays to brighten the horizon.

This is how you welcome daylight at Acadia National Park.


Acadia National Park is our easternmost national park. Its 47,000 acres reserve most of Mount Desert Island off the Atlantic Coast. Cadillac Mountain, named for French explorer Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac, rises on the eastern side of the island. Its granite summit catches the first daylight in the continental United States each New Year’s Day.


Acadia National Park is part of the area known as the “Dawn land” by its original inhabitants, the Wabaniki people. A confederacy of five First Nations and Native American nations, the Wabaniki includes the Abenaki, Maliseet, Mi’maq, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot people. Ten thousand years before Mount Desert was sighted by Samuel de Champlain, these Algonquian-speaking natives lived in settlements along the Eastern seaboard.


Acadia’s Atlantic coast is a wonderland of ancient, lichen-covered boulders and rugged shoreline. President Woodrow Wilson established it as Sieur de Monts National Monument on July 8, 1916. On February 26, 1919, it was named Lafayette National Park. The name was changed to Acadia on January 19, 1929, to honor the former French colony of Acadia.


George W. Dorr is called the “father of Acadia National Park,” but its financial benefactor was definitely John D. Rockefeller, Jr. He paid to develop over 50 miles of gravel carriage trails, with features that include 17 granite bridges and two historic gate lodges that remain today.  Along the paths are many cut granite “coping stones,” which act as rustic guardrails, and are known as “Rockefeller’s teeth.” The Rockefellers helped greatly with the reconstruction of the park after the wildfires of 1947, which destroyed over 10,000 acres.


Today, as one of the most-visited parks in the country, Acadia welcomes hikers and bicyclists to its trails. Forty different species of mammalian wildlife call Acadia home, including (from the small to the large) red and grey squirrels, chipmunks, white-tailed deer, beaver, porcupine, muskrat, foxes, coyotes, bobcats, black bear and moose. Acadia National Park is aided in preservation efforts by the Friends of Acadia, which has worked to create a private endowment that will maintain the current 44 mile carriage trail system in perpetuity.


Acadia National Park is waiting to welcome you, and the dawn, every morning. And it’s open now.

Photos by our intrepid #pendle10parks explorers:

Nikolai Karlov – @nikarlov (shots 3, 4, 5 & 6)

David Okoniewski – @oakcanoeski (shots 1 & 2)


See our Acadia National Park products here: SHOP

Have yourself…

…a merry one.


From all of us at Pendleton Woolen Mills.

Happy Birthday to Badlands National Park

IMG_6726South Dakota’s Badlands were authorized as a National Monument in 1929, officially established in 1939 and designated as a National Park on November 10, 1978. Badlands National Park is home to haunting natural beauty and some of the richest fossil beds in North America.


The name “Badlands” comes from the Lakota, who moved into the western plains during the late 18th century. They called the area Mako Sica, which translates as “eroded land” or “bad land.” As they traveled and hunted, the Lakota found the White River Badlands fossil beds and correctly surmised that the area had been underwater. They believed the skeletons belonged to a great sea beast called Unktegila. The ghost dances of the Lakota, led by the visionary Wovoka, were held in the remote tablelands of the Badlands.


History echoes in the spires and peaks of the eroded rock formations, across the prairies, and in the secluded valleys where Native American tribes have been hunting and living for 11,000 years.


Settlers and homesteaders arrived in the 20th century, but struggled to find a foothold in such arid conditions. The Dust Bowl wiped out most of the area’s farming, and plagues of grasshoppers took care of the rest. Abandoned sod houses dotted the area until the wind and weather took them down. Today, the area supports wheat farming.


Badlands National Park is a designated wilderness preserve. Here, you can experience the largest protected mixed-grasses prairie in the US. You can see mule deer, antelope, bighorn sheep and coyotes. Look a little closer to the ground, and you will see black-tailed prairie dogs. You might even catch a glimpse of the black-footed ferret, the most endangered land mammal in North America. And of course, you’ll see the American Land Bison, or buffalo.


The Badlands are an “avian crossroad,” a habitat for both eastern and western birds. The cliffs make excellent hunting grounds for golden eagles and prairie falcons. Cliff swallows and rock pigeons nest in the countless hollows. It is a birder’s paradise, but explore this park with caution; the country is hard to travel, with sharp rocks, yielding substrate, and very little water.


Sunset here is particularly beautiful. Enjoy it among the formations, as the setting sun catches the pinnacles, casting dramatic shadows.


Or settle onto the prairie, and enjoy the sounds of South Dakota; the wind in the grass and the evening birdsong.


Photography by Emmanuel Beltran: @stick_e

Shop Pendleton Badlands National Park: SHOP

Heading North with Pendleton and Canada Goose

There are times when the images tell the story best.  Canada Goose, Canada’s company for luxury down accessories, has joined us for a collaboration born of mutual respect for heritage, luxury and style. Each piece is crafted with 100% virgin wool from our Northwest mills.


Above: Down-Filled Hooded Scarf 

cap_web_pendleton_canada_gooseAbove: Down Ball Cap

Scarf_web_pendleton_canada_goose Above: Down-filled Scarf


Above: Down-Filled Blanket with Carrier

Images of Lisa Dengler, Photograph by Marcel Floruss

Available at SHOP

Tanner Goods and Pendleton: A Match Made in Oregon

Today’s post is brought to you by Tanner Goods, an Oregon company that specializes in fine leather goods (and more). We are proud to collaborate with them, and to share their enthusiasm for our first collaboration. Read on!


Pendleton for Tanner Goods
Adam R. Garcia
Pendleton for Tanner Goods


Buffalo and the National Parks: Pendleton’s New Buffalo Wilderness Blanket

BuffaloBlanketIn 2016, we will honor the centennial of our National Park Service. We will celebrate our National Parks, along with the employees and volunteers who work to hold the Parks in trust for generations to come. An important part of that trust includes preserving and managing each Park’s wildlife. The National Parks have played a key role in the preservation of the American bison, commonly known as the buffalo.

In the 16th century, North America was home to 25 to 30 million bison, making the American Plains Bison the most abundant single species of large mammal on Earth. The Plains Bison is a “keystone species.”  The trampling and grazing of these thundering herds actually shaped the ecology of America’s Great Plains. A bison can weigh over 2,500 pounds,  jump six feet vertically, and run 40 miles per hour when alarmed. This is an impressive animal.

The bison played a crucial part in the lives of Nomadic Native American peoples. One bison could provide 200 to 400 pounds of meat, as well as hides, robes, and sinew for bows. Hunting was accomplished on foot and on horseback through herded stampedes over buffalo jumps. For an accurate and detailed account of Native American hunting methods, along with art and photography, see this blog post at Hunters thanked the animals with rituals and prayers for the gift of their lives. The Natives, the herds and the habitat thrived.

Two hundred years later, the bison was hunted nearly to extinction.  Decimating factors included loss of habitat due to farming and ranching, and industrial-scale hunting by non-Natives.  The systematic destruction of the herds was promoted by the U.S. Army in order to strike an irrevocable blow to the way of life of the Plains Nations. The loss of the buffalo was an economic, cultural, and religious tragedy for the original inhabitants of North America. It was also a great loss to the natural ecology of the Great Plains.

Somehow, tiny “relict” herds survived. A few ranchers attempted restoration of the herds through private ventures in the late 1800s. Samuel Walking Coyote (Pen d’Oreille) started a small herd with seven orphaned calves he found west of the Rocky Mountain Divide. Another herd was formed from this initial group, and in the early 1900s, small herds were sent from this second herd to Canada’s Elk Island National Park, and the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma.

Left to graze in protected wilderness and park areas, the buffalo began to rebound. The Yellowstone Park Bison Herd formed naturally from a 23 bison that remained in the park after the massive slaughter at the end of the 19th century. This is the only continuously surviving herd in the Americas, and the largest at over 4,000 head. There are preservation efforts in many wilderness areas and National Parks, in part due to the beneficial effects of bison on regional ecology. Unlike domestic cattle, bison herds cultivate rather than deplete the native grasses through grazing.

Because of the close relationship between our national wilderness areas and the American bison, Pendleton commemorates this impressive land mammal as part of the Pendleton National Parks Collection. Our newest buffalo blanket, “Buffalo Wilderness” celebrates the resilience of a magnificent animal and its role in shaping the Great Plains.


The Buffalo Wilderness design recalls a time when millions of buffalo roamed grassy plains from Oregon to the Great Lakes, from Canada to Mexico. Today our National Parks protect the wilderness, and the buffalo herds can roam free. One of the largest herds (more than 4,000) of free-ranging wild buffalo lives in and around Yellowstone National Park. It is thought to be the only place in the United States where bison have lived continuously since prehistoric times. You can also see herds in Badlands, Grand Teton, Theodore Roosevelt and Wind Cave National Parks.

You can get more information on the blanket here. And remember, the purchase of items from our National Park Collection helps support the National Park Foundation. More information here.



Shop Pendleton with LIKE2BUY on Instagram for #INSTAGRATIFICATION


Our Instagram captures #pendletonstyle moments on the beach, the mountainside, or the sofa. Whether it’s you or your favortie furry friend enjoying our products, we love to see our stuff on real people in real time.

Now, with our new Like2Buy gallery, you can find out exactly what you’re coveting. If you want to buy it, it’s so simple, but if you just want information, it’s only a tap away.


You can shop for blankets, menswear and womenswear with the gallery. So follow us on Instagram and join the fun.

Happy Earth Day with Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool®: Sustainable, Beautiful, Responsible

EcoBeauty There are many, many products out there claiming to be green. From the sheep to the shelf, Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® passes strict standards of sustainability and stewardship, verified and certified. This means that if you were to take a Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® blanket and bury it, it would leave the earth better, not worse, for the addition. That’s a nice way to explain it, but we make blankets for you to use, not to bury. Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® products are designed to be delightful to touch, easy to care for and beautifully colored. And they are woven in the USA of 100% virgin wool.

Let’s start with our new Spring throws. These are all about the fun. These fringed throws come with a leather carrier, making this the perfect take-along blanket for your trips, picnics, hikes or sporting events. Best of all, they’re washable, so if your fun involves spills, sloshes, crumbs or mud, you’re covered. Just put it in the washing machine, even though it’s 100% virgin wool. We have two colorations of our classic Surf Plaid, and our new WoolDenim which looks like ring-spun denim, front and back. FringedThrowswLeatherCarrier Also new for Spring, we have washable fringed throws in the beautiful ombre plaids you think of when you think of Pendleton.


Be sure to check out the classic colors, too. Blocks, checks, plaids; these are just begging to be thrown over the arm of your sofa.

Our throws coordinate coordinate back to our Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® bed blankets. Here are the solids and heathers. All Wool is a perfect choice for top-of-bed. There is a subtlety to the texture, nothing shiny or artificial about it, and the colors will remain true forever. Check out the bed blankets in stripes and plaids. There are accent pillows, fabric by-the-yard, window panels and more available in Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool®.  Go warm with with traditional plaids, rustic with stripes and heathers, or keep it contemporary with checks. We have you and your bed totally covered. Blake Lively agrees! blake-lively-vogue-cover-august-2014-03_170247646998 So give us a  visit  and see all our colorful ways to be green.