It’s a Pendleton party! Come Join us this Friday!

Fall 2019 marks seven decades of style from Pendleton. And we are having a party!

The event details are here: Seven Decades of Style party

You can also register at Eventbrite: Pendleton party, Seven Decades of Style

08_2019_PAW_70th_Anniversary_V3.inddWe can’t wait to share the archive inspirations for this year – vintage clothes are encouraged, so put on your ’49er, bring a friend and have a blast.

 

See you there!

Why We Do This – Running the Grand Canyon with Greg Hatten

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In honor of the Grand Canyon‘s 100th anniversary, we are rerunning some guest posts from our friend Greg Hatten this summer. Enjoy.

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March of 2014 was a deadly month in the Grand Canyon for river runners.   The water level was well below average and even the most experienced boatmen saw water dynamics they had never seen before.  Low water created new hazards – holes were deeper, drops were sharper, jagged rocks that rarely see sunlight punched holes in our boats and holes in our confidence.

An accomplished group of nine kayakers just a few miles ahead of us lost one of their team mates to the river below Lava Falls.  There was a another serious accident in the group two days behind us midway through the trip.

Some of our wood boats were damaged, a few of our rubber rafts flipped, oars and ribs and teeth were broken, a helicopter rescue was required for a member of our team on Day 4. After 280 miles and 24 days on the water, we reached the end of the Grand Canyon and all agreed we were ready to do it again…as soon as possible.

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Who are we and why do we do this???   

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We are a band of wood boat enthusiasts who came to the Grand Canyon in March to re-run a famous trip from 1964 with our wood dory replicas, our canvas tents and bedrolls, our Pendleton wool blankets, and a couple of great photographers to capture the adventure.

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Fifty years ago, that trip played a crucial role in saving the Grand Canyon from two proposed dams that were already under construction.  If THAT trip had not happened, THIS trip would not have been possible and our campsites would be at the bottom of a reservoir instead of beside the river.  River running on the Colorado through the Grand Canyon would’ve been replaced by “Reservoir Running in Pontoons,” as most of the Grand Canyon would’ve been hundreds of feet under water.

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We are celebrating the success of the trip of  ‘64 and paying tribute to those men who left a legacy for future river runners like us to run the big water of the Colorado through the Grand Canyon in river boats.  We are brought together by Dave Mortenson, whose dad was one of those pioneers.

“Who we are” is easier to answer than “Why we do this.” There are moments on trips like these, when we are at the crossroads of chaos – where adventure and wonder intersect with danger and consequence – and the outcome is uncertain. THAT’s what makes it an adventure.  I can only speak for myself – but here’s my shot at answering “why…”

I do this because the Grand Canyon takes my breath away.  The first time I saw it from the bottom looking up, I fell in love with this place and was absolutely amazed by the size and beauty of the canyon.  Everything is bigger, deeper, taller, more colorful, more powerful, more everything than anyplace I have ever been.

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I do this because the Colorado River tests my physical ability as a boatman like no other river I have ever boated.  This is one of the most powerful rivers in North America and when that strong current bends the oars I’m rowing and I feel the raw force shooting up my aching arms and across my tired back, I’m electrified and anxious at the same time.

I do this because the rapids on this river test my mental ability as a boatman.  My friend and veteran Canyoneer Craig Wolfson calls it “Nerve.”  Scouting severe rapids and seeing the safest “line” to run is one thing – having the nerve to put your boat on that line is another.  Most of the difficult rapids require a run that puts your boat inches from disaster at the entry point in order to avoid calamity at the bottom.  Everything in your “experience” tells you to avoid the danger at the top – but you mustn’t.  Overriding those instincts and pulling off a successful run is a mental tug of war that is challenging beyond belief.

I do this because of the bonds we form as a team of 16 individuals working and cooking and rowing and eating and drinking and laughing together for 280 miles.  We problem-solve together, we celebrate together, we look out for each other, and we find a way to get along when every once-in-awhile the stress of the trip makes “some” of us a little “cranky.”   Sometimes, we experience the most vulnerable moments of our lives together.  These people are lifetime friends as a result of this adventure.

 

And finally – I do this because it brings out the best in me.  My senses are better, my mind is clearer, my body is stronger and I like to think I’m friendlier, funnier, more generous, and more helpful down in the Canyon.  It makes me want to be this open with people up on Rim when I get back to my regular routine.  It’s hard to articulate but for me, the place is magic.

Greg Hatten

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See the Grand Canyon Pendleton blanket and throw here: PARK BLANKETS

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The Board Shirt by Pendleton, for an Endless Summer

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As we head into the lazy days of summer, it’s time to celebrate the Pendleton Board Shirt.

In the early 1960s, a group called The Pendletones adopted their name in honor of the surf uniform of the day. When surfing came to California in the late 1950s, surfers devised performance wear: swim trunks and plaid Pendleton shirts over a layer of Vaseline. Surfers wore the same shirts over light pants on the shore, and a fashion trend was born.

Even though only one member of the group had ever been up on a surfboard, the Pendletones sang about the simple summer pleasures of the SoCal surf scene; waves, sunshine, cars and girls. Under the unique artistic leadership of Brian Wilson, layered instrumentation and soaring harmonies made these songs anything but simple.

The Pendletones changed their name to the Beach Boys in 1962. And though their name changed, their uniform didn’t. The band wore this blue and charcoal plaid shirt on the covers of 45s and LPs throughout the early 1960s. The Board Shirt remains our bestselling men’s wool shirt to this day. It’s a simple style with a straight hem, signature flap pockets and that easy sport collar with the telltale thread loop, just in case you’re buttoning all the way up. We know, it’s your favorite.

It’s a wonderful time to shop the board shirt. See them here: BOARD SHIRTS

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Jackson Sundown, the Bishop Brothers, and the Pendleton Round-Up. Let’er Buck!

Note: In honor of the Pendleton Round-Up, we’re sharing an older post about Jackson Sundown, who is one of the great riders of the American West. It explains our company’s long and rich connection with the Pendleton Round-Up. And you might want to read our earlier post about an exhibit of Jackson Sundown’s personal effects, with photos of modern-day volunteers raising the actual teepee in the historic shot below: see it here.  Let’er Buck!

The Pendleton Round-up  starts this week—an amazing rodeo adventure in Pendleton, Oregon, celebrating its 102nd year. Our designers travel there for inspiration, entertainment, and to watch our westernwear in action on rodeo competitors and fans. Oregon Public Broadcasting has a video titled “Pendleton Round-Up: The Wild West Way”  that’s well worth watching, and Cowboys & Indians magazine has some great background.

Among the historic images, you’ll see this shot:

This is Roy Bishop and Jackson Sundown posing at the Pendleton Round-Up. This image actually made the fashion blogs in 2009, when recreations of Roy Bishop’s fringed coat and Jackson Sundown’s oval-print shirt were part of Pendleton’s Centennial offering. But the story is about more than fashion history. This photo is about rodeo history.

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Happy National Donut Day!

Editor’s note: Today’s blog post is a FLASHBACK to a project that is ALL SOLD OUT–but it’s a fun one. This post was written by guest blogger Mark Poltorak, who manages the Pendleton employee store. Enjoy it!

Everyone who works at Pendleton’s corporate office has smelled it; that delicious odor of deep-fried donut batter as we leave the building and walk toward Burnside.

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A line of patient patrons congests the sidewalks for what seems like 24 hours a day.  We see the iconic pink boxes all over town, in the airport and on TV.

Established in 2003, Voodoo Doughnuts has become an iconic, must-see/eat in the “Keep Portland Weird” tourist scene.  Now, Voodoo has asked Pendleton to create a Voodoo Doughnut blanket that will keep you as warm as those fresh out-of-the-fryer sugary treats.

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The blanket features a detailed display of Voodoo icons.  In the center, emerging from the center of the blanket (and a doughnut, of course), we are greeted by none other than Baron Samedi.  Baron Samedi waits at the crossroads between the worlds of the living and the deceased.  He is armed with a shovel and eager to dig the graves and greet the souls of the newly departed.  It is rumored that Baron Samedi can be brought to a swoon with treats (such as doughnuts!).

A comforting sight to balance the grim aura of Baron is the impressive spread of Voodoo’s bread and butter: the doughnuts! Fans of Voodoo will find all their bizarre but delicious favorites: the McMinnville Cream, Neapolitan, Diablos Rex, Sprinkle, Bacon Maple Bar, Portland Cream and Triple Chocolate.

Of course, the blanket wouldn’t be complete without a representation of the most iconic Voodoo doughnut of all! The Voodoo Doll doughnut is featured multiple times.

Long after Baron has claimed us all for his own keeping, this eerie blanket will keep you warm.  And remember, “The Magic is in the Hole.”

May the Fourth be With You

starwarsday_01May the Fourth is the fan-driven celebration of all things STAR WARS. Pendleton is doing our part with a STAR WARS blanket giveaway on Instagram. This giveaway will run Friday through Monday. Entering is easy!

(1) Follow @pendletonwm on Instagram.

(2) Tag 2 friends in the comment section of this post: INSTAGRAM GIVEAWAY POST

(3) You’re entered, easy as that!

Entry period ends on Monday, May 7th, 2018 at midnight PST. Winner will be announced on Wednesday May 9th. For complete rules visit: www.pendleton-usa.com/rules

And to help you celebrate even more, all Star Wars blankets are 20% off today. Check them out!  STAR WARS BLANKETS

Mea Alford, 1945 Pendleton Round-Up Princess

When Mary Esther Brock (or Mea, as she’s been called most of her life) was appointed to the Court, there hadn’t been a Pendleton Round-Up for two years. World War II was still going on, but the community missed their annual tradition so much that they decided to hold it anyway. And an important part of the Round-Up is the Round-Up Court.

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Pioneer Heritage

Round-Up royalty was chosen based on family history, age and ability to ride a horse. Mea, reminiscing, stressed that a family’s pioneer background was one of the most important criteria. Her father’s grandparents had come from Missouri on the Oregon Trail in 1848 or 1849, settling first in Heppner, where her father, Wilson E. Brock, was born. Her grandfather was treasurer of the first Pendleton Round-Up. So her pioneer pedigree was impeccable on her father’s side.

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WE WALK TOGETHER by Ginew, Dyani White Hawk and Pendleton

Native American-owned apparel company Ginew of Portland, Oregon, has released their WE WALK TOGETHER wool blanket.

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The blanket represents a fusion of tribal cultures (Ojibwe, Oneida, and Mohican), and is the result of an exploration of design with artist DYANI WHITE HAWK. Each blanket is proudly woven in Oregon by Pendleton® Woolen Mills.

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GINEW, The Company

GINEW Gih-noo) is the only Native American owned premium denim collection. Focusing on American-made materials, they incorporate elements of their Native American heritage (Ojibwe, Oneida, & Mohican) to express a contemporary Native voice through premium apparel and accessories. Ginew is Native-Americana, fusing Native American style and workwear.

According to Ginew,

It is customary in our communities to wrap a newly joined couple in a blanket to symbolize their union. The blanket colors represent the sacred day (sunrise & sunset) and wampum belt (purples), teachings which impart values to guide us in our life together. The lodges are in the shape of traditional Ojibwe and Oneida dwellings. The crest fuses timeless symbols from each of our tribes, the dwelling (Ojibwe) and Skydome (Oneida). Together, the colors and symbols represent how we value our traditional beliefs in our home as we walk this journey of life together.

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The Artist, Dyani White Hawk

Dyani White Hawk is a mixed-media artist and curator working in Minneapolis, MN. White Hawk draws from her multi-cultural background and education to create abstract paintings and mixed media works that speak to her upbringing as a Lakota woman in an urban American landscape.

She talks about her background and design process:

I am a painter and mixed-media artist. I work predominantly in abstraction. My work combines influences, mediums and histories of modern abstract painting and Lakota abstract art forms. You can find more information on my website: www.dyaniwhitehawk.com

Erik, Amanda, and myself all met when we were at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It was a brief, single dinner meeting, but the connection lasted. I was excited to hear from Erik on ways we could collaborate. He threw out a few different possibilities before this one came together. In a very collaborative process, we worked to achieve a design that spoke to each of their tribal backgrounds, their individuality, their partnership, and their vision for high quality, finely crafted, culturally rooted products.

I am grateful for the partnership and the opportunity provided through our work together. Moreover, I am most excited to be able to be a part of and support the dreams and visions for another Native entrepreneurial team.

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The WE WALK TOGETHER blanket is woven of pure virgin wool and cotton. Each wool blanket is 64” x 80”, unnapped, felt bound, and adorned with a custom suede patch. Available on ginewusa.com.

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A Colorful Smoky Mountain Elopement

Today’s post is a repost from thebridelink.com  (with permission, of course). Enjoy it here, and if you’d like to see more photos, head over there! 

Smoky Mountain Elopement

Photography:  Leah Moyers Photography    Officiant : Radiant Gatherings

There is something so intimate, meaningful, and special about an elopement. The act of two people intentionally choosing to say ‘I do’ JUST to each other (and sometimes just parents or immediate family) has a certain charm that we adore. We were smitten when looking through talented Leah Moyers‘ photographs of their creekside ceremony in the Smoky Mountains National Park. We are all about infusing meaning into as many wedding day details as possible and Sandie and Greg did this to perfection – below you’ll read how this sweet couple met and why boats and water are paramount in their relationship (swoon…). After a personalized ceremony reading by officiant Radiant Gatherings, the newlyweds headed to Tennessee staple property Blackberry Farm for dinner and continued celebrations. Cheers to the new Mr. and Mrs!

Leah Moyers said:

“Smoky Mountain and Blackberry Farm Elopement: Sandie & Greg’s intimate elopement was so special, what incredible locations! We started the day in their room at Blackberry Farm in Walland, TN. Blackberry Farm is “one of America’s most celebrated intimate luxury hotels… situated on a pastoral 4,200-acre estate in the Great Smoky Mountains… one of the top rated properties in the world.” Sandie chose a beautiful Alice+Olivia dress with intricate embroidered scenes depicting wildlife and nature, very fitting for their wedding day in the mountains. Sandie’s earrings were cast rosemary. During the Victorian era, the herbs a bride carried held serious meaning: rosemary stood for remembrance. She wore a cast feather bracelet, her grandmother’s pin in her hair and clogs from Bryr’s handmade bridal line. We enjoyed wandering around the farm and taking portraits by the stream, the garden and the boat house. Sandie & Greg met on a weekend long kayaking trip and the boat house was a perfect place for them to have portraits made as boats are an important and sentimental part of their life together. Their ceremony took place by the water on mossy rocks in a magnificent part of the Smoky Mountains National Park. Intimate elopements are seriously amazing to photograph and I enjoyed spending the day with Sandie & Greg, capturing them in these beautiful natural areas. After they said I do Greg washed Sandie’s feet in the mountain stream and they celebrated with more portraits, a glass of champagne and wrapped themselves up in a Great Smoky Mountains National Park Pendleton blanket, a beautiful wedding gift. They ended their day with a dinner and weekend celebration at Blackberry Farm and then off to a Caribbean honeymoon. Officiant- Radiant Gatherings, Yacoubian Tailors, Pretty Little Papers, earrings and cuff bracelet by Michael Michaud, The Clay Pot Floral”

Smoky Mountain Elopement


In continuing with the mountain and nature theme, Sandie and Greg’s inviations featured the prettiest foraged foliage.


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smoky Mountain Elopement


Sandie’s boho-fabulous Alice + Olivia gown was so her! We loved the personalization this couple placed on their wedding day.


Smoky Mountain Wedding

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Now this is a first kiss… cue the ‘aaaaw’ …


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Greg washed Sandie’s feet in the mountain stream. We love this meaningful and traditional gesture of utmost respect and love.


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