Nike N7 and The College Fund blanket for 2019 – 7 Generations

7 Generations

7 Generations wool blanket, viewed from below, tossed into the air against a clear blue sky. This blanket is a partnership between Nike N7, Pendleton Woolen Mills, and Nike N7.

We are proud to present “7 Generations,” the latest blanket in the American Indian College Fund Collection which helps fund scholarships for Native American students. “7 Generations” is also our newest partnership with Nike’s N7 Fund, a trust whose mission is to bring sports to Native American and Aboriginal communities in the US and Canada.

Decoding the Symbols

Front and back views of the new N7/College Fund blanket by Pendleton, which has a large diamond shape in the middle, and a row of stepped designs at the top and bottom of the blanket. Colors are brown, gold, ivory, turquoise and rust.

This USA-made wool blanket illustrates the past, present and future of Native peoples. The central N7 motif represents the impact of each person (the diamond) on the three generations before and after (arrows). A storm pattern with zigzags of lightning honors heritage, while steps show the path to overcoming life’s challenges. The rich colors were inspired by traditional dyes, and reflect the beauty of the southwestern landscape.

The Designer

Designer Tracie Jackson sits on a wooden chair on a raised platform against a backdrop of white sheets. She looks to her left, chin in hand. She iw wearing a long skirt, white N7 t-shirt with a turquoise Nike swooshy, and traditional navajo jewelry and concha belt. On her feet she is wearing moccasins from the N7 collection that she designed. In her right hand she holds a shutter button, so she can take the photo herself.

This blanket was designed by Tracie Jackson, a Diné artist and designer from Star Mountain in the Navajo Nation. She is a 4th generation artisan. Her grandparents and mother are silversmiths, and both her maternal great grandmothers are rug weavers. Her family encouraged her to study the traditional art forms of her tribe, and with their support she became a painter, jeweler, beader, and graphic designer.

Tracie studied design at the University of Oregon and currently works in Portland, Oregon, designing for the Nike N7 program. This has been her dream job since she was 14 years old, when she first saw N7 at a Native basketball tournament. “I was taught to get an education and use it to help our Native community, which pushed me to become a designer for N7.”

Photos and Models

A group of seven native American women sit and stand on a raised platform against a backdrop of billowing white cotton fabric. They are dressed in Nike clothing and shoes, and wear traditional authentic Native American jewelry. Designer Tracie jackson sits in the center of the group, holding the shutter button to take the photo.

The photos of this collection are fantastic. You’ll notice that the designer and her models–athletes, leaders and activists–are holding shutter buttons, and choosing how to represent themselves in these photographs by taking their own shots. We are proud to be part of this.

See and Learn More

Please go see the entire collection here (opens in new tab): Nike N7 collection

See the “7 Generations” blanket here (opens in new tab): 7 Generations

 

Win a Ginew Heritage Coat on Instagram!

Native American man wearing Ginew denim jacket lined with colorful Paendleton wool - jacket open to show liningNatrive American man standing in profile wearing denim GINEW jacket with collar standing to show Pendleton wool lining.

This Ginew Heritage Coat (lined in Pendleton wool) can be yours! We are proud to partner with GINEW, a Native-owned premium denim brand, on a giveaway over at our Instagram.

To quote Ginew’s site:

In designing the Ginew Heritage Coat, we recreated a meaningful garment as it was worn by our grandfathers and great-grandfathers in daily life. By exploring our Anishinaabe and Oneida heritages, we came to appreciate their rich history of work and dedication. When we wrap ourselves in this coat, we wrap ourselves in the ways of our ancestors. The premium, American-made materials of our Heritage Coat are not just wool, cotton and brass; they are oral histories, old photographs, and traditional lore. Coats such as these were more than mere garments: they were work tools, worn in the machine shops, forests, and fields by relatives who dedicated themselves to the hard labor of providing for their families.

This is a 7-day giveaway, and the entry period runs from Thursday, September 26th  2019 at 9:00 AM PST, to Monday, September 30th 2019 at 11:59 PM PST.  The rest of the rules are after the jump.

See our past posts about Ginew here: Pendleton and Ginew

Read more about Ginew here: Ginew Heritage Coat

Find our Instagram here: @pendletonwm on Instagram

Continue reading

It’s a Pendleton party! Come Join us this Friday!

Fall 2019 marks seven decades of style from Pendleton. And we are having a party!

The event details are here: Seven Decades of Style party

You can also register at Eventbrite: Pendleton party, Seven Decades of Style

08_2019_PAW_70th_Anniversary_V3.inddWe can’t wait to share the archive inspirations for this year – vintage clothes are encouraged, so put on your ’49er, bring a friend and have a blast.

 

See you there!

Why We Do This – Running the Grand Canyon with Greg Hatten

77055_1288_ALT1

In honor of the Grand Canyon‘s 100th anniversary, we are rerunning some guest posts from our friend Greg Hatten this summer. Enjoy.

7_Day-4-Izzy

March of 2014 was a deadly month in the Grand Canyon for river runners.   The water level was well below average and even the most experienced boatmen saw water dynamics they had never seen before.  Low water created new hazards – holes were deeper, drops were sharper, jagged rocks that rarely see sunlight punched holes in our boats and holes in our confidence.

An accomplished group of nine kayakers just a few miles ahead of us lost one of their team mates to the river below Lava Falls.  There was a another serious accident in the group two days behind us midway through the trip.

Some of our wood boats were damaged, a few of our rubber rafts flipped, oars and ribs and teeth were broken, a helicopter rescue was required for a member of our team on Day 4. After 280 miles and 24 days on the water, we reached the end of the Grand Canyon and all agreed we were ready to do it again…as soon as possible.

8_River-Rats

 

Who are we and why do we do this???   

6_the-line

 

We are a band of wood boat enthusiasts who came to the Grand Canyon in March to re-run a famous trip from 1964 with our wood dory replicas, our canvas tents and bedrolls, our Pendleton wool blankets, and a couple of great photographers to capture the adventure.

5_camaraderie

Fifty years ago, that trip played a crucial role in saving the Grand Canyon from two proposed dams that were already under construction.  If THAT trip had not happened, THIS trip would not have been possible and our campsites would be at the bottom of a reservoir instead of beside the river.  River running on the Colorado through the Grand Canyon would’ve been replaced by “Reservoir Running in Pontoons,” as most of the Grand Canyon would’ve been hundreds of feet under water.

2_shallows

We are celebrating the success of the trip of  ‘64 and paying tribute to those men who left a legacy for future river runners like us to run the big water of the Colorado through the Grand Canyon in river boats.  We are brought together by Dave Mortenson, whose dad was one of those pioneers.

“Who we are” is easier to answer than “Why we do this.” There are moments on trips like these, when we are at the crossroads of chaos – where adventure and wonder intersect with danger and consequence – and the outcome is uncertain. THAT’s what makes it an adventure.  I can only speak for myself – but here’s my shot at answering “why…”

I do this because the Grand Canyon takes my breath away.  The first time I saw it from the bottom looking up, I fell in love with this place and was absolutely amazed by the size and beauty of the canyon.  Everything is bigger, deeper, taller, more colorful, more powerful, more everything than anyplace I have ever been.

3_sensawunda

I do this because the Colorado River tests my physical ability as a boatman like no other river I have ever boated.  This is one of the most powerful rivers in North America and when that strong current bends the oars I’m rowing and I feel the raw force shooting up my aching arms and across my tired back, I’m electrified and anxious at the same time.

I do this because the rapids on this river test my mental ability as a boatman.  My friend and veteran Canyoneer Craig Wolfson calls it “Nerve.”  Scouting severe rapids and seeing the safest “line” to run is one thing – having the nerve to put your boat on that line is another.  Most of the difficult rapids require a run that puts your boat inches from disaster at the entry point in order to avoid calamity at the bottom.  Everything in your “experience” tells you to avoid the danger at the top – but you mustn’t.  Overriding those instincts and pulling off a successful run is a mental tug of war that is challenging beyond belief.

I do this because of the bonds we form as a team of 16 individuals working and cooking and rowing and eating and drinking and laughing together for 280 miles.  We problem-solve together, we celebrate together, we look out for each other, and we find a way to get along when every once-in-awhile the stress of the trip makes “some” of us a little “cranky.”   Sometimes, we experience the most vulnerable moments of our lives together.  These people are lifetime friends as a result of this adventure.

 

And finally – I do this because it brings out the best in me.  My senses are better, my mind is clearer, my body is stronger and I like to think I’m friendlier, funnier, more generous, and more helpful down in the Canyon.  It makes me want to be this open with people up on Rim when I get back to my regular routine.  It’s hard to articulate but for me, the place is magic.

Greg Hatten

4_crew

 

See the Grand Canyon Pendleton blanket and throw here: PARK BLANKETS

PWM_USA_label

The Board Shirt by Pendleton, for an Endless Summer

Beach-Boys-Woody-Wagon

As we head into the lazy days of summer, it’s time to celebrate the Pendleton Board Shirt.

In the early 1960s, a group called The Pendletones adopted their name in honor of the surf uniform of the day. When surfing came to California in the late 1950s, surfers devised performance wear: swim trunks and plaid Pendleton shirts over a layer of Vaseline. Surfers wore the same shirts over light pants on the shore, and a fashion trend was born.

Even though only one member of the group had ever been up on a surfboard, the Pendletones sang about the simple summer pleasures of the SoCal surf scene; waves, sunshine, cars and girls. Under the unique artistic leadership of Brian Wilson, layered instrumentation and soaring harmonies made these songs anything but simple.

The Pendletones changed their name to the Beach Boys in 1962. And though their name changed, their uniform didn’t. The band wore this blue and charcoal plaid shirt on the covers of 45s and LPs throughout the early 1960s. The Board Shirt remains our bestselling men’s wool shirt to this day. It’s a simple style with a straight hem, signature flap pockets and that easy sport collar with the telltale thread loop, just in case you’re buttoning all the way up. We know, it’s your favorite.

It’s a wonderful time to shop the board shirt. See them here: BOARD SHIRTS

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Jackson Sundown, the Bishop Brothers, and the Pendleton Round-Up. Let’er Buck!

Note: In honor of the Pendleton Round-Up, we’re sharing an older post about Jackson Sundown, who is one of the great riders of the American West. It explains our company’s long and rich connection with the Pendleton Round-Up. And you might want to read our earlier post about an exhibit of Jackson Sundown’s personal effects, with photos of modern-day volunteers raising the actual teepee in the historic shot below: see it here.  Let’er Buck!

The Pendleton Round-up  starts this week—an amazing rodeo adventure in Pendleton, Oregon, celebrating its 102nd year. Our designers travel there for inspiration, entertainment, and to watch our westernwear in action on rodeo competitors and fans. Oregon Public Broadcasting has a video titled “Pendleton Round-Up: The Wild West Way”  that’s well worth watching, and Cowboys & Indians magazine has some great background.

Among the historic images, you’ll see this shot:

This is Roy Bishop and Jackson Sundown posing at the Pendleton Round-Up. This image actually made the fashion blogs in 2009, when recreations of Roy Bishop’s fringed coat and Jackson Sundown’s oval-print shirt were part of Pendleton’s Centennial offering. But the story is about more than fashion history. This photo is about rodeo history.

Continue reading

Happy National Donut Day!

Editor’s note: Today’s blog post is a FLASHBACK to a project that is ALL SOLD OUT–but it’s a fun one. This post was written by guest blogger Mark Poltorak, who manages the Pendleton employee store. Enjoy it!

Everyone who works at Pendleton’s corporate office has smelled it; that delicious odor of deep-fried donut batter as we leave the building and walk toward Burnside.

amway-nutrilite-42

A line of patient patrons congests the sidewalks for what seems like 24 hours a day.  We see the iconic pink boxes all over town, in the airport and on TV.

Established in 2003, Voodoo Doughnuts has become an iconic, must-see/eat in the “Keep Portland Weird” tourist scene.  Now, Voodoo has asked Pendleton to create a Voodoo Doughnut blanket that will keep you as warm as those fresh out-of-the-fryer sugary treats.

voodoo-blanket

The blanket features a detailed display of Voodoo icons.  In the center, emerging from the center of the blanket (and a doughnut, of course), we are greeted by none other than Baron Samedi.  Baron Samedi waits at the crossroads between the worlds of the living and the deceased.  He is armed with a shovel and eager to dig the graves and greet the souls of the newly departed.  It is rumored that Baron Samedi can be brought to a swoon with treats (such as doughnuts!).

A comforting sight to balance the grim aura of Baron is the impressive spread of Voodoo’s bread and butter: the doughnuts! Fans of Voodoo will find all their bizarre but delicious favorites: the McMinnville Cream, Neapolitan, Diablos Rex, Sprinkle, Bacon Maple Bar, Portland Cream and Triple Chocolate.

Of course, the blanket wouldn’t be complete without a representation of the most iconic Voodoo doughnut of all! The Voodoo Doll doughnut is featured multiple times.

Long after Baron has claimed us all for his own keeping, this eerie blanket will keep you warm.  And remember, “The Magic is in the Hole.”

May the Fourth be With You

starwarsday_01May the Fourth is the fan-driven celebration of all things STAR WARS. Pendleton is doing our part with a STAR WARS blanket giveaway on Instagram. This giveaway will run Friday through Monday. Entering is easy!

(1) Follow @pendletonwm on Instagram.

(2) Tag 2 friends in the comment section of this post: INSTAGRAM GIVEAWAY POST

(3) You’re entered, easy as that!

Entry period ends on Monday, May 7th, 2018 at midnight PST. Winner will be announced on Wednesday May 9th. For complete rules visit: www.pendleton-usa.com/rules

And to help you celebrate even more, all Star Wars blankets are 20% off today. Check them out!  STAR WARS BLANKETS

Mea Alford, 1945 Pendleton Round-Up Princess

When Mary Esther Brock (or Mea, as she’s been called most of her life) was appointed to the Court, there hadn’t been a Pendleton Round-Up for two years. World War II was still going on, but the community missed their annual tradition so much that they decided to hold it anyway. And an important part of the Round-Up is the Round-Up Court.

Mea-Alford-RoundUpPrinces-1945

Pioneer Heritage

Round-Up royalty was chosen based on family history, age and ability to ride a horse. Mea, reminiscing, stressed that a family’s pioneer background was one of the most important criteria. Her father’s grandparents had come from Missouri on the Oregon Trail in 1848 or 1849, settling first in Heppner, where her father, Wilson E. Brock, was born. Her grandfather was treasurer of the first Pendleton Round-Up. So her pioneer pedigree was impeccable on her father’s side.

Continue reading