Heroic Blankets for Independence Day

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Happy Fourth of July!Today is the day to celebrate America and her heroes, especially those who proudly served to defend our country. Here are some of our patriotic made-in-the-USA blankets. Click the names to see more information.

Brave Star

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This contemporary interpretation of the American flag is a celebration of the patriotism of Native Americans. In 1875 Indian scouts carried messages from fort to fort in the West. Native American soldiers saw action with Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders in Cuba. And soldiers from many tribes battled in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf and Iraq. Five Native Americans have been awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery “above and beyond the call of duty.” The design marries modern asymmetry and vintage Americana. The unique striations, using pulled out yarns, reflect an era when dyes were made from plants.

 

Wildland Heroes

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The scent of smoke fills the air. An orange glow lights the horizon. Mother Nature is on alert, and Wildland Firefighters stand ready to defend her. These brave men and women hold the line against fire’s destruction with team effort; digging lines, running hoses, saving structures when they can. In Pendleton’s tribute to Wildland Firefighting, bands of deep forest alternate with lines of flame, lighting trees endangered by flame. A portion of this blanket’s sales help the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, which supports families and injured firefighters in times of need.

 

Grateful Nation

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The Grateful Nation blanket  honors the sacrifice of brave men and women who have defended freedom throughout the history of the United States of America. Each authentically colored stripe represents a service ribbon awarded to veterans of historical conflicts in which our country has engaged:

  • World War II Asiatic Pacific Campaign
  • World War II Europe-Africa-Middle East Campaign
  • Korean Service
  • US Vietnam Service
  • Southwest Asia Service (Gulf War)
  • War on Terrorism

A portion of every blanket’s sale goes to support the Fisher House Foundation and its mission to support the families of veterans. As their website states:

Fisher House Foundation is best known for the network of comfort homes built on the grounds of major military and VA medical centers nationwide and in Europe.   Fisher Houses are beautiful homes, donated to the military and Department of Veterans Affairs.  These homes enable family members to be close to a loved one at the most stressful time – during the hospitalization for a combat injury, illness or disease… Since 1990, the foundation has saved military, veterans and their families an estimated $200 million in out of pocket costs for lodging and transportation.

 

The Few, The Proud

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The official emblem of the United States Marine Corps, woven in a wool blanket to honor the valor and loyalty of the Marines. The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. Each element signifies the Marine Corps mission and legacy. The anchor reflects the naval tradition of the Marines as part of the Department of the Navy. The globe represents readiness to serve in any part of the world. The bald eagle, symbol of America, holds a ribbon in its beak that reads “Semper Fidelis,” or “Always Faithful,” a reference to the unending valor and loyalty of the Corps. Dyed, woven and hand-finished in America for quality that’s second to none.

 

Bighorn

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Straddling the borders between Wyoming and Montana, Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area is home to spectacular canyons, clear blue waterways and countless wildlife. This woven-in-USA pattern was inspired by the colors, history and vast landscape of this special region. In 1825, the Bighorn River called famed mountain man Jim Bridger to build a raft of driftwood and ride it through the foaming rapids. Part of the river was dammed to create Bighorn Lake, but the spectacular canyon it carved remains, named for the Bighorn sheep that travel its rocky, treacherous paths. Located in Montana and Wyoming, about one third of the park unit is located on the Crow Indian Reservation. One quarter of the Pryor Mountains Wild Horse Range lies within the Bighorn Canyon Recreation Area.

 

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Happy Earth Day with Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool®: Sustainable, Beautiful, Responsible

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Monday, April 22nd is Earth Day. We’re celebrating with an Instagram giveaway here: @pendletonwm  Check it out, and you might win a Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® throw!

There are many, many products out there claiming to be green. From the sheep to the shelf, Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® passes strict standards of sustainability and stewardship, verified and certified. This means that if you were to take a Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® blanket and bury it, it would leave the earth better, not worse, for the addition.

That’s a nice way to explain it, but we make blankets for you to use, not to bury. Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® products are designed to be delightful to touch, easy to care for and beautifully colored. And they are woven in the USA of 100% virgin wool.

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Blankets come in solids (see them here) and stripes, checks, plaids (click here to see those); and be sure to see the new Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® striped throws with whipstitch binding. These are just begging to be thrown over the arm of your sofa.

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See the new throws here: Striped Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® Throws

There are also fringed throws (here) and shams (here) to complete your bedding ensemble. And in addition to being eco-friendly, all these products are woven and made in the USA.

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The Weavers Series by Pendleton

Collections and Series Blankets

If you collect Pendleton blankets, you are probably aware of our blanket series releases. From the College Fund blankets to the Legendary Collection to the Heritage Collection, we seek out designs that tell a story, both as individual blankets and as grouped collections. Heritage blankets are recreations from our archives. Legendary blankets often showcase designs by contemporary Native American artists. And in the past, we have had the Mill Tribute Series and the Vintage Blanket collection (both retired).

Weavers Series Blankets

The Pendleton Weavers Series is a unique new group of collectible blankets based on weavings by contemporary Native American fiber artists. The original weavings are found in markets or trading posts in the American Southwest by our design team, which selects beautiful examples of handwoven art to translate into Pendleton blankets. The weavers have been excited by this opportunity, which celebrates the tremendous talent, skill and creativity of Native American artists. The series will continue in 2019.

Roselyn Begay

Roselyn Begay

The inspiration for this series came from an original work by Roselyn Begay, a Navajo/Dine weaver who lives near Chinle, Arizona. She has been weaving for over fifty years. Her work is available at trading posts and markets in Sedona, Teec Nos Pos, and Ganado. Some of her earliest memories are of watching her mother at the loom. At age five, her mother began teaching Roselyn the art of Navajo weaving.

It began as a 12 x 12 inch table piece, but this design made a gorgeous blanket with unique and subtle colors. It was featured in a VOGUE magazine fashion editorial in 2017.

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Mary Henderson

Mary Henderson is a Navajo weaver from Sanostee, New Mexico. Mary has spent 43 years weaving with her mother, aunt, sister-in-law and cousin-sister, teaching and inspiring each other as they work. Her original weavings can be found at the Toadlena Trading Post in New Mexico. She is proud to carry on the traditions of her mother and grandmother, who taught Mary to weave when she was twelve years old.

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Black and white blankets are some of Pendleton’s strongest and most popular designs. They are faithful to their traditional design roots while looking sophisticated in modern decor settings.

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See the Weavers Blankets here: Pendleton Weavers Series

All blankets shown are woven and manufactured in the USA.

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Sky Stories: Pendleton Blankets for the 2017 Eclipse 

If a beautiful Pendleton blanket is part of your plan to celebrate and commemorate the upcoming full solar eclipse, we are here with some suggestions! We’ve been weaving blankets that tell stories for over a century, and some of our most beautiful designs celebrate the night skies. All of these wool blankets are made in the USA.

Here are our Sky Stories.

Night Dance

ZE493-53339-Night-Dance-RobeNight falls as dancers gather on the Square Ground for the Stomp Dance, performed by many tribes: Caddo, Seneca, Muskogee, Cherokee, Shawnee, Seminole and more.  Against the dark blue of the night sky, the bright flames of the ceremonial fire rise.  Mother Fire is considered a sacred being who watches over the dancers and receives their songs and prayers. The Chief calls upon his medicine man and speaker to help him lead this sacred gathering. Men take their places in arbors built facing each of the Four Directions. With traditional and treasured turtle-shell rattles fastened to their legs, dancers begin their shuffle and stomp. Strong medicine and the repetitive steps of the Stomp Dance lead them to an inspirited, meditative state. The night echoes with the haunting call and response of their special songs. The Stomp Dance lasts until morning arrives to fill the sky with colors of Dawn.

Full Moon Lodge

ZL494-53137_legendary_full_moon_lodgeThis design was created in partnership with Muscogee Creek artist Starr Hardridge, and is part of our Legendary Collection. This design illustrates the relationship between humankind, Mother Nature and the creator of the universe, whose medicine is love. It acknowledges our place between the sun and the full moon. Full Moon Lodge is part of our Legendary Collection, which honors stories and symbols of Native American cultures.

Pueblo Dwelling

ZD435-53055_heritage_pueblo_dwellingThis is a vintage design from 1923, the heyday of trade blanket production. Dazzling colors and geometric designs tell a story. Arrows symbolize the paths of life and power. Stars centered in squares echo the bright Morning Star, a spirit honored by many pueblo dwellers. This blanket is part of our Heritage Collection.

Star Wheels

ZE493-53049_jacquard_star_wheelsHigh atop the Big Horn Range in Wyoming sits one of the best-known medicine wheels or sacred hoops. This spoked circle of stones was created by Plains Indians between 300 and 800 years ago. Astronomers have noted that during the summer solstice, the spokes of the wheel point to the rising and setting of the sun, and four bright stars, a discovery celebrated by astronomers.

Northern Lights

ZE494-53415-Northern-Lights-FThe Northern Lights are as mysterious as they are glorious. Native legends offer intriguing explanations for these shining bands of transparent color that dance across the night skies. To the Fox tribe of Wisconsin, the lights were an omen of war, spirits of enemies rising up to do battle again. To their neighbors, the Menominee tribe, the lights belonged to torches carried by the manabai’wok, giant spirits of hunters and fishermen that were out spearing fish.  Northern lights are most visible at midnight in the extreme north, and occasionally seen as far south as America’s Gulf Coast.

Gatekeeper

 

ZD485-51109_heritage_gatekeeperThe Gatekeeper is an original Pendleton design from 1935. This USA-made wool blanket is a beautiful example of a Center Point pattern, which contains a primary design element that falls within a band through the center of the blanket. The eight-point star is a common motif in Sioux culture and often represents the morning star, signifying a new beginning with the break of dawn. As gatekeeper of the morning, it shows the way to the light and knowledge of the day.

Stella Maris

ZE493-53247-Robe-Stella-MarisStar of the sea, or Stella Maris, represents the guiding presence of the North Star. As a ‘pole star,’ it shines an abiding light by which sailors have navigated for as long as man has traveled the sea. The graduated palette of indigo, lapis, turquoise and ivory unfolds in a dynamic chevron pattern that evokes the emanation of starlight in the night sky, recalling the traditional craft of Star Quilts. Designer Alyssa Pheobus Mumtaz is an American artist known for her multimedia drawing practice, inspired by iconography of traditional textiles. Her work is exhibited worldwide and recognized by numerous fellowships and grants.

 

Journey West

ZE493-52773_jacquard_journey_westThis dynamic blanket celebrates the pioneering spirit of our founder, weaver Thomas Kay, who journeyed to America from England, arriving in Oregon in 1863. Its design was inspired by a blanket discovered in a 19th-century European mill which included the designer’s notes and calculations handwritten neatly along the sides. The pattern highlights the universal appeal of geometric shapes and lines. The hooked patterns inside the large diamonds are common symbols of luck and prosperity. Its quality and beauty is a tribute to the generations of weavers that have continued Thomas Kay’s legacy of quality and excellence.

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We’re having a gift card giveaway on Instagram over the weekend–starting tomorrow. If you win, which blanket would you choose?

 

 

Pendleton x Kitsbow Icon Shirt for 2016

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We’re proud to show off our newest collaboration with Kitsbow: the Icon shirt for 2016. This shirt is a marriage of wool, Nature’s first technical fabric, with Schoeller 3X Dry panels.

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Icon shirt features include:

  • articulated sleeves and cuffs to create an adapted fit ready for riding
  • Classic menswear styling
  • Perforated stretch gussets at shoulders for increased mobility and ventilation both on and off the bike
  • Laser cut 3X Dry Schoeller panels strategically placed over shoulders and elbows for abrasion resistance
  • Pendleton Wool woven in Washougal, Washington
  • Leather label with hand-branded logo

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This shirt happens to be Men’s Journal‘s pick for best cycling shirt.

Here’s what they’re saying about it:
“This Pendleton wool flannel shirt has been in Kitsbow’s lineup for a few years now and during testing it’s proven rugged both while commuting and as an excellent piece for hiking and even as an apres-ski shirt. The USA-woven wool is naturally wind- and water-resistant, and a lot warmer than cotton flannel. Kitsbow adds venting and articulation at the backs of the shoulders, as well as subtle patching at the shoulders and elbows, the better to protect against abrasion if you decide to ride singletrack in the Icon. For us the best application though has been as an everyday piece that flows seamlessly between commuting, coffee shop runs, and weekends chopping wood to build a bonfire.”

Just a note, here. Kitsbow chooses the fabrics for these shirts.  It never fails that when presented with the full array of our Umatilla wool plaids, they choose the very best of the classic Pendleton plaids. So go see the full selection.

16_icon_family_5060Shop the full selection of ICON shirts here: SHOP KITSBOW

Thanks to Kitsbow for all photography. Now get out there and ride!

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Rocky Mountain National Park: Taking a Blanket Home with a #pendle10parks Explorer

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The Rocky Mountain range stretches for over 3,000 miles, from New Mexico to the northernmost reaches of British Columbia.

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Rocky Mountain National Park is one of many national parks in the range; in Canada, Banff, Jasper, Kootenay and Yoho; on the US side, Yellowstone, Grand Teton, Glacier and more.

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Rocky Mountain National park was dedicated on September 4, 1915, and became America’s tenth national park. At 14,259, it was also America’s highest. That has changed in 101 years. Currently, it’s one of the five highest parks in the lower 48, because Denali beats everything, obviously.

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Rocky Mountain is still one of the America’s largest parks, at 416 square miles and 265,769 acres of wilderness. It hosts over three million visitors per year. Motorists enjoy the highest paved road in America.

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Hikers, campers and climbers are drawn by its 35 trailheads, 260 miles of horse trails, and the gorgeous waterfalls that tumble through the park’s almost 500 miles of streams and creeks, including the headwaters of the Colorado River.

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Those are some impressive numbers. But the park’s visual splendor is even more impressive.

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Since a quarter of the park’s land is above the treeline, it offers a rare chance to experience the alpine wilderness. Wildlife is abundant and varied, with 280 species of birds and 60 types of mammals, including moose, elk, black bears, mountain goats, mule deer, the ever-present coyote and the famed bighorn sheep. These massive (non-wool producing) sheep have become symbols of the park. That’s why they are featured on the Pendleton blanket label, shown here on the coffee cup.

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And here’s the blanket:

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Rocky Mountain National Park

Blanket: Colorado’s Rocky Mountain ecosystem rises from lush grassland and forests to sub-alpine, alpine and barren alpine tundra in blue, green, gold and grey stripes.

Label: Bighorn sheep bask in the sunny lowlands, reintroduced after near-extinction.

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Our #pendle10explorer Kate Rolston did a breathtaking job of taking our Rocky Mountain National Park blanket home to its park.

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You can see more of Kate’s work here: @kate_rolston

And remember, your purchase of our National Park Collection helps support preservation and restoration of America’s Treasures.

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Lindsey Thornburg and Pendleton team up again for artistic, beautiful capes.

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Lindsey Thornburg has done it again.

Our favorite New York-based, western USA-raised designer has once again taken beautiful Pendleton blankets and transformed them as only she can. With careful attention to the play of each blanket’s patterns, she’s created magic. We’ve linked to the blanket used in each cape so you can see them flat, and truly appreciate what she does. Above: Spirit Guide

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Above: J. Capps & Sons Tribute #7

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Above: Stella Maris by artist Alyssa Pheobus

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Above and below: Skywalker

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Worn by celebrities and fashion devotees across the world, Lindsey’s capes are available now at www.lindseythornburg.com .

Labor Day: Stories from Pendleton’s People

Ed. note–For Labor Day, we bring you stories by those who work for us day and and day out. Their employment with out company ranges from one to fifty years. The video above, filmed in one of our union mills, is by Jay Carroll (thanks, Jay). 

Amanda Coppa—Product Manager, Home Division—July 2007 through present

My career experience at Pendleton has been an excellent and unique one. In nearly nine years with the Home Division I have continually evolved my position. Starting as the Home Merchandise coordinator and today I manage all the in-line and custom/collaboration Product Development for the division. I feel very fortunate to have a role where every day I am doing something different. When I started I was told I would be wearing a lot of hats. I’ve always found this appealing in a job and wouldn’t have it any other way. I’m fortunate to work for a boss that has much confidence in our abilities and vision.

In addition to exploring new product categories, I love working on the custom and collaboration blanket and fabric developments. I am the liaison between the partner (Levis, UGG, Nike, Ace Hotel, Subaru and Poler for example) and our internal Pendleton teams – Fabric Design, Production and Sales. From a custom blanket or fabric to a hooded Poncho towel I handle the process from concept to production set-up. Another exciting part of my position is traveling to accounts for sales calls and tradeshows. This has taken me to many big cities, but also some places I never thought I would go… Dodgeville, WI – High Point, NC – Buffalo, NY.

One of the reasons I enjoy working here the most is my team I spend each and every day with. We not only do good work, we have fun doing it. I have quite a few great Pendleton memories, but the top three would be managing the Star Wars project, my first inspiration trip to the Southwest and the 2009 Sales Meeting in Pendleton, OR to celebrate our centennial. I know I’m in the right place and speak enthusiastically about my career when my 3 year old son already has a passion for what I do and had decided his first dog’s name is going to be “Pendleton”.

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Brooke Myers—Retail Store Associate, Lancaster, PA—2015 through present

When I was younger, I did not necessarily see myself working in retail. As most children do, I saw myself doing something big – something exciting, something that would keep me on my toes and intrigue me every day. These descriptions usually do not come to mind when one says they work in retail. Working for Pendleton Woolen Mills has been a completely different experience. Who would have thought that you could be not only a salesperson, a manager; but also a historian, an explorer, and lastly a valued member of a family – not just another employee? My experience working for Pendleton has not been an ordinary one and I mean that in the best way possible.

Rich in history and heritage, the story of this company has captivated me from the beginning. Every day that I come to work I am eager to find out more. From its origins in North American exploration, Native American trade and legend, to the evolution of men’s and women’s fashion and style, the Pendleton story is not one easily forgotten. It brings me so much fulfillment to learn about the roots of this company and share the many stories of our past with others.

Another component of the multi-faceted brand of Pendleton that continues to make every day of work rewarding is the emphasis and dedication to our National Parks. By creating excitement through product and educating others about our parks, we are not only contributing to our parks monetarily but cultivating an environment that stresses the importance of the preservation and protection of our beautiful country.

Since I have started working for Pendleton Woolen Mills a little over a year ago, I can confidently say that I am now intertwined and attached to the history, craftsmanship, and uniqueness of this company. It makes my job easier knowing that I am part of a family that is dedicated to not only their brand and product, but also their employees and customers.

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Lakshmi Sylvie Dady—2015 through 2016

Pendleton has been a part of my family since we migrated to this country from Guyana, South America two generations ago. It has been a great joy to continue the family tradition of working in textiles and fashion as a Pendleton employee. Although I am new to the company, the brand has a rich history that transcends corporate identity and is part of my family’s story.

Having owned her own accessory company in Guyana, South America, my German-born grandmother was immediately drawn to the Pendleton brand upon her arrival to Milwaukie, Oregon. She encouraged my mother to get an after school job in the Pendleton mill near their home. My mother, then a mere 16 years of age, quickly learned the hard work that goes into producing the high quality Pendleton products our family coveted. Mama went on to a career in nursing and eventually followed in her mother’s footsteps of owning her own company, manufacturing fashion forward scrubs called “It’s What’s on the Inside that Counts.” Surely her humble beginnings in the mill helped build the foundation for creating her own textile business years later.

Growing up in the Northwest, Pendleton is as much a part of being an Oregonian as is relishing the rain. From my Native best friend whose parents draped themselves and their home in the rich colors and patterns of Pendleton to receiving a full outfit from the company as a Rose Festival Princess in 2009, Pendleton patterns are the unofficial flag of this fine state. Going into the corporate office to get custom fitted for my Pendleton outfit as Cleveland High Schools Rose Festival Princess remains a highlight of my experience on the court. I still relish my sesquicentennial ‘Spirit of the People’ patterned skirt, glass case, notebook cover and purse gifted by the company. The company went so far as to sew custom labels with our title and name onto our skirts, I smile every time I see my “Princess Sylvie” tag.

My love for this brand has only grown over time and gifts from it continue to be highly valued amongst my family. Upon my return to Portland after 7 years away for undergrad and graduate school, I was thrilled to see a position open at the Pendleton store at the Portland International Airport. I’ve been with the company since March, 2016 and thoroughly enjoy continuing the family tradition of working for America’s greatest woolen mill.

It’s been a pleasure reflecting on my Pendleton story and I hope you feel inspired to continue creating yours.

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Verna J. Ashton—1966 through 2016 with assistance to:

Strategical Services Head, Ed Pedley

Fabric Design Dept. Head, John Jouret

Presidents C.M. Bishop, Jr. and C.M. Bishop III

 

Although the scrapbooks confirm a mid-60’s employment record with Pendleton Woolen Mills, my personal connection begins a few years earlier.  When I met my future husband, Richard Ashton, at High School, his father, Howard Ashton, worked for the Bureau of U.S. Customs and his office just happened to be located on the 2nd floor, NE corner of the old / former US. Custom’s Building directly across the street West of the current Pendleton Building (if he were still there, my office window would have looked directly into his!).  He often told us of his travels for the day and related several times when he was assigned to go to the docks to inspect bales of wool being brought into the country from Australia or New Zealand to be delivered to Pendleton’s Columbia Wool Scouring Plant – beginning the process of becoming fine woolen fabrics.  Additionally, my future Mother-in-law, Marion Ashton, worked as a spinner at Pendleton’s Foundation Factory Plant and it was there that she obtained fabrics for hand-sewn shirts for her son and gave me the remnants so I could make matching garments.  Our matching outfits were always commented on at school and especially the red/black plaids worn on “spirit day” as those were our school colors.

Connections first through the Ashton family, and yes, Richard too was employed summers and even refinished the wood floors in the Foundation Plant along with the Brot Bishop boys; but it was through my sister, Malinda Pfeifle Staples, that I became acquainted with Pendleton as my employer as she held the secretary position under Ed Pedley in Statistical Services. In April 1966 I had a choice to make – either continue studies at Portland State College or take the offer at Pendleton to work for Mr. Pedley – my sister was leaving to begin her family.  Thus began a life journey that though the formal career has now officially concluded with retirement on April 29th, I am in the finishing room. The friendships, relationships, business associations and memories are completing my life-story tapestry by attaching the binding edges.

My story begins with being honored to meet and know C. M. Bishop until his passing in 1969; a never-to-be forgotten innocent and embarrassing blunder voiced during a National Sales Meeting at Salishan Lodge (Coffee, Tea or… how does that go?!); Shorthand learned in High School proved invaluable when asked to take notes from the Ambassador to Romania (Alan Green) while vising with his friend C. M. Bishop,  Jr.; Sitting at the feet of Ms. Pat Mitchell (who had been secretary to C. M. Bishop) learning valuable history, skills and understanding.  Pat will celebrate 107 years of life this August; Letters and phone calls to our Nation’s President George Bush (the elder Bush) as well as many other US Representatives, State Governors and political figures who were friends to the Bishop family; Assisting Portland’s current First Lady, Nancy Hales, in her mission for Pendleton gifts to take abroad for government dignitaries on the Mayor’s travels, and garments to wear herself – a true Pendleton Ambassador; Relationships with Round-Up personalities, Queen Whitney White in 2007, Native American Elders…

But long before hearing Mr. B’s (C.M. Bishop, Jr.) 1993 corporate speech quoting  a 1941 inscription written to him by his Father, C. M. Bishop, on the flyleaf of his co-authored book “Pioneer Woolen Mills in Oregon,” I felt and experienced these words  “… the best inheritance to receive or to leave is a good name” lived out not only through the Bishop men and Management of the Company, but also every one of the women – wives, aunts, sisters, and daughters – in their consistent and constant sweet spirits, graciousness and courtesies. “ I subscribe to a belief that as Pendleton has been blessed with the ability to create through the woven thread beautiful fabrics and designs that many covet, cherish and last a lifetime, God is weaving our life-story through our relationships and responses to His shuttle.

Pendleton Woolen Mills and the Bishop family have and are leaving that good name and reputation for future generations.  Honesty, integrity, the Golden Rule standard are the legacy that keeps Pendleton great and America strong.  God bless America and God bless Pendleton Woolen Mills.  Cheers!

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