Warriors Circle of Honor, by Harvey Pratt

Veterans’ Day 2020

For Veterans’ Day, we’d like to feature the Warriors Circle of Honor blanket, designed by artist Harvey Pratt.

The Warriors Circle of Honor blanket by Harvey Pratt.

The Artist & Memorial

Harvey Pratt (Cheyenne/Arapaho) is an Oklahoma artist who works in painting, sculpting, wood carving, bronze, and graphic design. He served with the 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion in Vietnam. He has worked in law enforcement for fifty years and is one of the foremost forensic artists in America. He currently serves as the chairperson of the Interior Indian Arts and Crafts Board, and as a traditional Southern Cheyenne Peace Chief.

Mr. Pratt designed the National Native American Veterans Memorial, at Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC. This memorial commemorates the service and sacrifice of Native American, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native Veterans—past, current, and future. The memorial is a place of honor, recognition, reflection and healing for all Native veterans and their families.

For a deeper look at Mr. Pratt and his work on the memorial, please enjoy this film.

The Blanket

Pendleton is proud to present Mr. Pratt’s “Warriors’ Circle of Honor” blanket design, based on the memorial.

Warriors Circle of Honor blanket, front.

The Sacred Fire burns at the center of bands of color representing Air, Fire, Water, and Earth. A border of stars and stripes has openings to allow spirits to enter. Four hands wearing feathers of bravery and triumph mark the cardinal directions. Oval shapes echo the museum’s Grandfather Rocks.

Warriors Circle of Honor, reverse view.

More Information

For more information on Mr. Pratt’s work, please visit his website:  harveypratt.com.

To learn more about the blanket, visit our website: Warriors’ Circle of Honor

Pendleton label with bald eagle

A Horse Called Paint by Judd Thompson

A Horse Called Paint

The Horse Called Paint blanket comes off the loom.

As beautiful as this blanket looks coming off the loom, you’ll love it even more in finished form.

Judd Thompson

Born in 1983, Thompson grew up on the Crow Indian Reservation, surrounded by art in his family’s business, The Custer Battlefield Trading Post. After graduating from the University of Wyoming with a degree in Art & Art History, he moved to Billings, Montana, where he uses his passion for color theory in a variety of media, including painting and sculpture.

The Blanket

A Horse Called Paint, a blanket for Pendleton Woolen Mills designed by artist Judd Thompson.

A dark horse gallops, silhouetted against a snowy night in “A Horse Named Paint,” by Montana artist Judd Thompson. The reverse is beautiful in a dramatic photo-negative way, too (does anyone remember photo negatives? we have to wonder…).

The reverse side of A Horse Called Paint.

Made in the USA

Photo technology has changed, but Pendleton blankets are timeless. This blanket, like all of our traditional wool blankets and throws, is woven, finished, and packed by hand in the USA in our Pacific Northwest mills. See it here: A Horse Called Paint

Made in USA label with eagle for Pendleton

2020 Blankets with Stories to Tell

New Blankets Have Arrived

This year will be one that generates many stories, and 2020 is not over yet. In this very unusual year, we will keep bringing you beautiful wool blankets that have their own stories to tell. Here are some of our favorites, along with their legends.

The Alamosa blanket by Pendleton - red, beige, blue

Alamosa

“Of a time long ago, these things are said.” The Navajo language is spoken like a poem, and tells of the first beings, the Air-Spirit People, who emerged in the First World. There, a red island held the Insect People; ants, dragonflies, beetles, and a dwelling called House of Red Rock. To the east, a stepped pattern shows the Place Where the Waters Crossed, home to the sunrise. In the center, blue streams converge, then flow toward each of the sacred Four Directions. 

This is one of our most popular introductions this year. See it here: Alamosa

Juniper Mesa blanket by Pendleton - beige diamond designs

Juniper Mesa

Thanks to deep taproots, western junipers thrive where other trees fail, scattered across mesa tops in the deserts of the Southwest. Known for their twisting, mystical shapes and long life—some live over a thousand years—junipers produce aromatic berries used by Puebloans since ancient times as an herbal remedy. In this design, western junipers offer shade, sustenance and habitat to desert wildlife, shown as arrows that pass below, through and over branches.

This Nine Element blanket is a favorite among our design teams. See it here: Juniper Mesa

Saddle Mountain blanket by Pendleton - gold, purple, blue and

Saddle Mountain

Saddle Mountain is a scenic peak in the Oregon Coast Range, and the tallest mountain in Oregon’s Clatsop County. It is also one of the most beautiful places in Oregon to watch the sunrise. Bold blocks of warm colors evoke the rising sun in a design derived from early strip quilt patterns. In the center, a row of stylized stars evoke the planets Mercury and Venus, sometimes called Morning Stars, as they rise on a new day.

With its bold colors and quilt-inspired design, this blanket makes a strong statement. See it here: Saddle Mountain

Thunderbird-mountain-front

Thunderbird Mountain

The Menominee of Northern Wisconsin tell of a great mountain that floats in the western sky. Here dwell the Thunderbirds, messengers of the Sun and controllers of the weather. These magnificent flying creatures delight in battles, and compete to accomplish deeds of greatness and heroism. They cause the rain and hail storms that can save crops, or ruin them. Their valor holds back the Misikinubik, giant horned snakes that might overrun the earth if not for the Thunderbirds.

See it here: Thunderbird Mountain

This blanket celebrates ancient legends with striking geometry. And because this one has such a striking reverse, here is the other side of Thunderbird Mountain. Which side do you like more? Reversibility is one of the benefits of blankets woven on jacquard looms; one blanket, two looks.

Thunderbird-mountain-back

You can get more information and see the reverses of all these blankets at http://www.pendleton-usa.com.

Made in USA label with eagle for Pendleton

Making Room on the Loom: Retiring blankets for 2020

Retiring blankets for 2020

Pendleton has been telling stories with our blankets since the first blanket mill opened in 1909. Each year, certain Pendleton blanket designs are retired. These designs are all available at pendleton-usa.com in limited quantities. Is one of these stories yours?

PAINTED HILLS

Pendleton Painted Hills blanket

Rising from the dry plains of Eastern Oregon, bare earth undulates in folds of scarlet, ochre, and yellow. These are the Painted Hills, whose brilliant stripes inspired this design and were created by oxidized mineral deposits in layers of volcanic ash. Adventurers who want to take a road trip into the past can see the hills, visit the nearby John Day Fossil beds and explore the ghost towns of this remote part of Oregon’s landscape.

Learn more here: Painted Hills Blanket

BIGHORN

Pendleton Bighorn blanket

Straddling the borders between Wyoming and Montana, Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area is home to spectacular canyons, clear blue waterways and countless wildlife. In 1825, the Bighorn River called famed mountain man Jim Bridger to build a raft of driftwood and ride it through the foaming rapids. Part of the river was dammed to create Bighorn Lake, but the spectacular canyon it carved remains, named for the Bighorn sheep that travel its rocky, treacherous paths. Located in Montana and Wyoming, about one third of the park unit is located on the Crow Indian Reservation. One quarter of the Pryor Mountains Wild Horse Range lies within the Bighorn Canyon Recreation Area.

Learn more here: Bighorn blanket

TURQUOISE RIDGE

Pendleton Turquoise Ridge blanket

Turquoise is known as the “fallen sky stone.” Prized for its beauty in colors that range from white to aqua to deepest green, turquoise has been used for amulets, beads, jewelry, carvings and more for ten thousand years. Legends of the Navajo, Hopi, Pueblo and Apache nations mention turquoise. In one legend, a tremendous drought brought great suffering to the People of the Earth. When the skies finally opened and shed rain on the People, they rose up to sing, dance and shed tears of joy. Their grateful tears mixed with the rain and seeped into Mother Earth to become Sky Stone.

Learn more here: Turquoise Ridge blanket

BUTTERFLY

Pendleton Butterfly blanket - front view

Sitting Bull challenged us all “to put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children.” Sitting Bull College and the American Indian College Fund memorialize his efforts and echo his belief that education can transform the future. We honor Sitting Bull’s legacy with flower and butterfly designs similar to those on his regalia.  A caterpillar’s transition to butterfly mirrors the transformative power of education—a fitting remembrance for such a visionary leader.  Created exclusively for the American Indian College Fund, a nonprofit organization that helps fund scholarships for Native American students and tribal colleges. Your purchase helps support their honorable mission.

Learn more here: Butterfly blanket

Pendleton Butterfly blanket-reverse view

 

Pendleton label with bald eagle: "Pendleton since 1863 Highest Quality Made in the USA."

Heroic Blankets for Independence Day

A young woman stands in front of a mountain, wrapped in a Pendleton Brave Star blanket. Her long blond hair and the blanket are blowing in the wind.

Happy Fourth of July!

Today is the day to celebrate America and her heroes, especially those who proudly served to defend our country. Here are some of our patriotic made-in-the-USA blankets. Click the names to see more information.

Brave Star

Pendleton Brave Star wool blanket in red white and blue

This contemporary interpretation of the American flag is a celebration of the patriotism of Native Americans. In 1875 Indian scouts carried messages from fort to fort in the West. Native American soldiers saw action with Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders in Cuba. And soldiers from many tribes battled in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf and Iraq. Five Native Americans have been awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery “above and beyond the call of duty.” The design marries modern asymmetry and vintage Americana. The unique striations, using pulled out yarns, reflect an era when dyes were made from plants.

 

Wildland Heroes

The Pendleton Wildland Heroes blanket.

The scent of smoke fills the air. An orange glow lights the horizon. Mother Nature is on alert, and Wildland Firefighters stand ready to defend her. These brave men and women hold the line against fire’s destruction with team effort; digging lines, running hoses, saving structures when they can. In Pendleton’s tribute to Wildland Firefighting, bands of deep forest alternate with lines of flame, lighting trees endangered by flame. A portion of this blanket’s sales help the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, which supports families and injured firefighters in times of need.

 

Grateful Nation

The Pendleton Grateful Nation blanket.

The Grateful Nation blanket  honors the sacrifice of brave men and women who have defended freedom throughout the history of the United States of America. Each authentically colored stripe represents a service ribbon awarded to veterans of historical conflicts in which our country has engaged:

  • World War II Asiatic Pacific Campaign
  • World War II Europe-Africa-Middle East Campaign
  • Korean Service
  • US Vietnam Service
  • Southwest Asia Service (Gulf War)
  • War on Terrorism

A portion of every blanket’s sale goes to support the Fisher House Foundation and its mission to support the families of veterans. As their website states:

Fisher House Foundation is best known for the network of comfort homes built on the grounds of major military and VA medical centers nationwide and in Europe.   Fisher Houses are beautiful homes, donated to the military and Department of Veterans Affairs.  These homes enable family members to be close to a loved one at the most stressful time – during the hospitalization for a combat injury, illness or disease… Since 1990, the foundation has saved military, veterans and their families an estimated $200 million in out of pocket costs for lodging and transportation.

 

The Few, The Proud

Pendleton Marines blanket featuring the logo of the USMC, red white and blue

The official emblem of the United States Marine Corps, woven in a wool blanket to honor the valor and loyalty of the Marines. The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. Each element signifies the Marine Corps mission and legacy. The anchor reflects the naval tradition of the Marines as part of the Department of the Navy. The globe represents readiness to serve in any part of the world. The bald eagle, symbol of America, holds a ribbon in its beak that reads “Semper Fidelis,” or “Always Faithful,” a reference to the unending valor and loyalty of the Corps. Dyed, woven and hand-finished in America for quality that’s second to none.

 

Bighorn

The Pendleton Bighorn blanket.

Straddling the borders between Wyoming and Montana, Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area is home to spectacular canyons, clear blue waterways and countless wildlife. This woven-in-USA pattern was inspired by the colors, history and vast landscape of this special region. In 1825, the Bighorn River called famed mountain man Jim Bridger to build a raft of driftwood and ride it through the foaming rapids. Part of the river was dammed to create Bighorn Lake, but the spectacular canyon it carved remains, named for the Bighorn sheep that travel its rocky, treacherous paths. Located in Montana and Wyoming, about one third of the park unit is located on the Crow Indian Reservation. One quarter of the Pryor Mountains Wild Horse Range lies within the Bighorn Canyon Recreation Area.

 

PWM_USA_label

 

 

 

The Weavers Series by Pendleton

Collections and Series Blankets

If you collect Pendleton blankets, you are probably aware of our blanket series releases. From the College Fund blankets to the Legendary Collection to the Heritage Collection, we seek out designs that tell a story, both as individual blankets and as grouped collections. Heritage blankets are recreations from our archives. Legendary blankets often showcase designs by contemporary Native American artists. And in the past, we have had the Mill Tribute Series and the Vintage Blanket collection (both retired).

Weavers Series Blankets

The Pendleton Weavers Series is a unique new group of collectible blankets based on weavings by contemporary Native American fiber artists. The original weavings are found in markets or trading posts in the American Southwest by our design team, which selects beautiful examples of handwoven art to translate into Pendleton blankets. The weavers have been excited by this opportunity, which celebrates the tremendous talent, skill and creativity of Native American artists. The series will continue in 2019.

Pendleton Weavers Series blanket number one, from a work by Rosalyn Begay.

Roselyn Begay

The inspiration for this series came from an original work by Roselyn Begay, a Navajo/Dine weaver who lives near Chinle, Arizona. She has been weaving for over fifty years. Her work is available at trading posts and markets in Sedona, Teec Nos Pos, and Ganado. Some of her earliest memories are of watching her mother at the loom. At age five, her mother began teaching Roselyn the art of Navajo weaving.

It began as a 12 x 12 inch table piece, but this design made a gorgeous blanket with unique and subtle colors. It was featured in a VOGUE magazine fashion editorial in 2017.

The Weavers Series blanket in a VOGUE editorial feature.

Mary Henderson

Mary Henderson is a Navajo weaver from Sanostee, New Mexico. Mary has spent 43 years weaving with her mother, aunt, sister-in-law and cousin-sister, teaching and inspiring each other as they work. Her original weavings can be found at the Toadlena Trading Post in New Mexico. She is proud to carry on the traditions of her mother and grandmother, who taught Mary to weave when she was twelve years old.

Pendleton Weavers Series #2, by mary Henderson, a black and white blanket.

Black & White simplicity

Black and white blankets are some of Pendleton’s strongest and most popular designs. They are faithful to their traditional design roots while looking sophisticated in modern decor settings.

Six black and white Pendleton blankets, displayed on a wall mounted rack.

See the Weavers Blankets here: Pendleton Weavers Series

All blankets shown in this post are woven and manufactured in the USA.

PWM_USA_label

New Blankets for Spring

Celebrating the Coast

This Spring, we have two new wool blankets that honor two beautiful coastal spots; Falcon Cove and Point Reyes.

A picnic set up on Pendleton blankets

Point Reyes

Point Reyes is a magnificent stretch of coast in California.

Chimeny Rock on Point Reyes, Californiaphoto by King of Hearts (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0] https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

The first inhabitants of California’s Point Reyes were the peaceful Coast Miwok, who lived in harmony with the seasons through gathering, fishing and hunting. Spring brought roots, bulbs, nettles, clover and lettuce, and beaches full of kelp. In summer, grasses and flowers surrendered their ripe seeds. Fall brought nuts, buckeye, bay and hazel. Trapping and arrow hunting brought in forest birds, rabbits and deer. Dip net fishing and shellfish harvest provided food year round. The Coast Miwok also used Nature’s gifts as builders and artisans. They fashioned highly sought-after trade beads from empty shells, and elaborate crown-style headdresses made from flicker, the long, narrow flight feathers of a birdwing.

To see one of these beautiful headdresses, we suggest you visit the site of photographer Lee Rentz: Miwok headdress

Point_Reyes_flat

See the blanket here: POINT REYES

Falcon Cove

Falcon Cove is a hidden beach on Oregon’s coastline.

"Magic Rocks Beach" at Falcon Cove on the Oregon coastline

This secluded spot is home to “Magic Rocks Beach,” where ocean-tumbled stones make a rumbling music when washed by the tides. The natural hues of sand, grasses and seaside bluffs are arranged in a balanced pattern that represents the harmony of this beautiful stretch of coastline, where thousands of birds nest each year. This misty, rain-washed country is the traditional home of the Clatsop peoples, one of the many coastal tribes that lived where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean.

To hear the magic rocks (starts at about :43), click here: Falcon Cove video

Front and back views of the Falcon Cove blanket by Pendleton

Made in the USA

Both blankets are completely woven and finished in our Pacific Northwest mills. They are ready to accompany you on all your spring and summer adventures, so get to planning. Spring is coming!

Pendleton_Spring_Blankets

Sky Stories: Pendleton Blankets for the 2017 Eclipse 

The Eclipse is Coming!

If a beautiful Pendleton blanket is part of your plan to celebrate and commemorate the upcoming full solar eclipse, we are here with some suggestions! We’ve been weaving blankets that tell stories for over a century, and some of our most beautiful designs celebrate the night skies. All of these wool blankets are made in the USA.

Here are our Sky Stories.

Night Dance

Night-Dance-blanket by PendletonNight falls as dancers gather on the Square Ground for the Stomp Dance, performed by many tribes: Caddo, Seneca, Muskogee, Cherokee, Shawnee, Seminole and more.  Against the dark blue of the night sky, the bright flames of the ceremonial fire rise.  Mother Fire is considered a sacred being who watches over the dancers and receives their songs and prayers. The Chief calls upon his medicine man and speaker to help him lead this sacred gathering. Men take their places in arbors built facing each of the Four Directions. With traditional and treasured turtle-shell rattles fastened to their legs, dancers begin their shuffle and stomp. Strong medicine and the repetitive steps of the Stomp Dance lead them to an inspirited, meditative state. The night echoes with the haunting call and response of their special songs. The Stomp Dance lasts until morning arrives to fill the sky with colors of Dawn.

Full Moon Lodge

Full Moon Lodge blanket by PendletonThis design was created in partnership with Muscogee Creek artist Starr Hardridge, and is part of our Legendary Collection. This design illustrates the relationship between humankind, Mother Nature and the creator of the universe, whose medicine is love. It acknowledges our place between the sun and the full moon. Full Moon Lodge is part of our Legendary Collection, which honors stories and symbols of Native American cultures.

Pueblo Dwelling

Pueblo Dwelling blanket by PendletonThis is a vintage design from 1923, the heyday of trade blanket production. Dazzling colors and geometric designs tell a story. Arrows symbolize the paths of life and power. Stars centered in squares echo the bright Morning Star, a spirit honored by many pueblo dwellers. This blanket is part of our Heritage Collection.

Star Wheels

Star Wheels blanket by PendletonHigh atop the Big Horn Range in Wyoming sits one of the best-known medicine wheels or sacred hoops. This spoked circle of stones was created by Plains Indians between 300 and 800 years ago. Astronomers have noted that during the summer solstice, the spokes of the wheel point to the rising and setting of the sun, and four bright stars, a discovery celebrated by astronomers.

Northern Lights

Northern Lights blanket by PendletonThe Northern Lights are as mysterious as they are glorious. Native legends offer intriguing explanations for these shining bands of transparent color that dance across the night skies. To the Fox tribe of Wisconsin, the lights were an omen of war, spirits of enemies rising up to do battle again. To their neighbors, the Menominee tribe, the lights belonged to torches carried by the manabai’wok, giant spirits of hunters and fishermen that were out spearing fish.  Northern lights are most visible at midnight in the extreme north, and occasionally seen as far south as America’s Gulf Coast.

Gatekeeper

Gatekeeper blanket by PendletonThe Gatekeeper is an original Pendleton design from 1935. This USA-made wool blanket is a beautiful example of a Center Point pattern, which contains a primary design element that falls within a band through the center of the blanket. The eight-point star is a common motif in Sioux culture and often represents the morning star, signifying a new beginning with the break of dawn. As gatekeeper of the morning, it shows the way to the light and knowledge of the day.

Stella Maris

Stella-Maris blanket by PendletonStar of the sea, or Stella Maris, represents the guiding presence of the North Star. As a ‘pole star,’ it shines an abiding light by which sailors have navigated for as long as man has traveled the sea. The graduated palette of indigo, lapis, turquoise and ivory unfolds in a dynamic chevron pattern that evokes the emanation of starlight in the night sky, recalling the traditional craft of Star Quilts. Designer Alyssa Pheobus Mumtaz is an American artist known for her multimedia drawing practice, inspired by iconography of traditional textiles. Her work is exhibited worldwide and recognized by numerous fellowships and grants.

Journey West

Journey West blanket by PendletonThis dynamic blanket celebrates the pioneering spirit of our founder, weaver Thomas Kay, who journeyed to America from England, arriving in Oregon in 1863. Its design was inspired by a blanket discovered in a 19th-century European mill which included the designer’s notes and calculations handwritten neatly along the sides. The pattern highlights the universal appeal of geometric shapes and lines. The hooked patterns inside the large diamonds are common symbols of luck and prosperity. Its quality and beauty is a tribute to the generations of weavers that have continued Thomas Kay’s legacy of quality and excellence.

A young woman wrapped in a Journey West blanket stares at the horizon, with the words "Solar Eclipse Giveaway"

We’re having a gift card giveaway on Instagram over the weekend–starting tomorrow. If you win, which blanket would you choose?