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Posts from the ‘home and blankets’ Category

New Blankets for 2016

The new blanket introductions are always a a highlight here at Pendleton. We work on these designs for a full year before we ever see a sample roll off the loom. Something magical happens when flat, fine-edged designs are woven in wool. The patterns we thought we knew are that much more breathtaking when translated into textile form. It is always exciting and a little mysterious.

If you’ve pored over out website or catalog, then come into a store to see a blanket in person, you know exactly what we’re talking about. There is a depth and beauty to a blanket that’s truly breathtaking. Well, wait no more! The new blankets are up at pendleton-usa.com. We have some beautiful new room settings to inspire you. The blanket names are linked, you can click for more information at our website.

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Do you like warm colors and sinuous lines? Topeka Plains might be your pattern.

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The Great Plains cover over 500,000 square miles of North America. Long ago, this vast expanse of steppe and grassland was covered by tall grasses that supported the Plains Bison. The Bison in turn supported the way of life of nomadic tribes that hunted and farmed the prairies, including Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Pawnee, Crow, Comanche, Arapaho and many more. Topeka Plains pays tribute to the waving grasslands of the Great Plains with a harmonious pattern of sinuous lines. The balance of this banded design reflects the balance of life among the Nations of the Great Plains.

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Cactus Trail is another colorful pattern, with primaries set off by a background of Oxford grey. It’s a tribute to the Cactus to Clouds Trail in California.

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Jagged white peaks rise beside rows of Saltillo diamonds representing desert flora–Cholla and Barrel cactus, Banana Leaf yucca, Ribbonwood trees, Pinyon pines, Manzanita and scrub oak. Steps and hooks symbolize a path travelled partly in darkness.  This is the Cactus to Clouds Trail, an 18-mile hike rising 10,300 feet from Palm Springs, California, to San Jacinto Peak. Built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression, it is privately maintained by local hikers who install markers and maintain water caches along a challenging trail with the greatest elevation increase in the United States.

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Infinite Steps (on the wall) is part of our new contemporary collection.

Infinite Steps

Through careful arrangement of color and shape, Infinite Steps creates a three-dimensional staircase on a two-dimensional plane.  This is an optical illusion–an illustration that tricks the brain into seeing what is not actually there. The traditional craft of quilting uses many optical illusions in its patterns, such as Carpenter’s Color Wheel, Tumbling Blocks, Pinwheels and variations of the Log Cabin pattern. Infinite Steps pays tribute to the precision and planning quilters use when creating these dazzling effects.

 

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Boro Patchwork is also part of the contemporary collection.

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Boro patchwork reflects the value of ‘mottainai’ or ‘too good to waste.’ The word Boro, meaning ‘rags,’ describes items of clothing and bedding that have been patched and repaired many times. Boro clothing was worn by peasants, merchants and artisans in Japan from the Edo period through the early Showa period. Patches are often worked in hishizashi, personal stitching patterns developed by menders. Some Boro items are sewn through generations. The beautiful indigo shades of repaired cotton and rough-spun hemp work together in a subtle patchwork that reflects a culture’s devotion to preservation.

That is just a taste of what you will be seeing at pendleton-usa.com . Visit us often to see what’s rolling off the loom at our USA mills!

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Happy Birthday, Yellowstone National Park

March marks the birthday month of Yellowstone National Park. Covering 2,219,791 acres in Wyoming, Montana & Idaho, Yellowstone is recognized as the oldest National Park in America.

It was President Ulysses S. Grant who signed legislation to preserve the Yellowstone Wilderness for future generations, and his words are forever emblazoned on the north gate into the park: “FOR THE BENEFIT AND ENJOYMENT OF THE PEOPLE.”

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Yellowstone is enjoyed by nearly four million visitors each year. Many are drawn by the unique  hydrothermal attractions of the geyser basins.

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Others are drawn to the hiking and camping.

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And many are drawn to fishing the pristine waterways.

OurFreeWays_Yellowstone031What follows are some of the beautiful words of Teddy Roosevelt, the “conservationist president.” These words capture his reverence and for and devotion to the wilderness. The beautiful photos were taken by a #Pendle10Parks explorers who brought the Yellowstone National Park blanket home to Yellowstone.

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“The extermination of the buffalo has been a veritable tragedy of the animal world.”

Even during times when the buffalo was considered to be extinct, small remnant herds grazed the Yellowstone wilderness, making it the only place in the United States where bison have continuously grazed since prehistoric times. Yellowstone is currently home to two of the largest buffalo herds on federally protected land.

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“The farther one gets into the wilderness,

the greater is the attraction of its lonely freedom.”

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“Life is a great adventure…accept it in such a spirit.”

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Enjoy your explorations.

Thanks to Corey & Liz of @ourfreeways for #pendle10parks photography

See Pendleton’s Yellowstone blanket HERE

Morning in Acadia National Park

Bring your Pendleton blanket and find a spot while it’s still dark. Watch the sky turn from black to deep blue as you listen to the calls of waking birds. Hear the rustle of ocean air as it raises waves to lap against the shoreline and skims through the forests of this peaceful paradise. Look to the distance, where the sky meets the Atlantic, and wait for the first rosy rays to brighten the horizon.

This is how you welcome daylight at Acadia National Park.

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Acadia National Park is our easternmost national park. Its 47,000 acres reserve most of Mount Desert Island off the Atlantic Coast. Cadillac Mountain, named for French explorer Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac, rises on the eastern side of the island. Its granite summit catches the first daylight in the continental United States each New Year’s Day.

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Acadia National Park is part of the area known as the “Dawn land” by its original inhabitants, the Wabaniki people. A confederacy of five First Nations and Native American nations, the Wabaniki includes the Abenaki, Maliseet, Mi’maq, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot people. Ten thousand years before Mount Desert was sighted by Samuel de Champlain, these Algonquian-speaking natives lived in settlements along the Eastern seaboard.

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Acadia’s Atlantic coast is a wonderland of ancient, lichen-covered boulders and rugged shoreline. President Woodrow Wilson established it as Sieur de Monts National Monument on July 8, 1916. On February 26, 1919, it was named Lafayette National Park. The name was changed to Acadia on January 19, 1929, to honor the former French colony of Acadia.

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George W. Dorr is called the “father of Acadia National Park,” but its financial benefactor was definitely John D. Rockefeller, Jr. He paid to develop over 50 miles of gravel carriage trails, with features that include 17 granite bridges and two historic gate lodges that remain today.  Along the paths are many cut granite “coping stones,” which act as rustic guardrails, and are known as “Rockefeller’s teeth.” The Rockefellers helped greatly with the reconstruction of the park after the wildfires of 1947, which destroyed over 10,000 acres.

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Today, as one of the most-visited parks in the country, Acadia welcomes hikers and bicyclists to its trails. Forty different species of mammalian wildlife call Acadia home, including (from the small to the large) red and grey squirrels, chipmunks, white-tailed deer, beaver, porcupine, muskrat, foxes, coyotes, bobcats, black bear and moose. Acadia National Park is aided in preservation efforts by the Friends of Acadia, which has worked to create a private endowment that will maintain the current 44 mile carriage trail system in perpetuity.

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Acadia National Park is waiting to welcome you, and the dawn, every morning. And it’s open now.

Photos by our intrepid #pendle10parks explorers:

Nikolai Karlov – @nikarlov (shots 3, 4, 5 & 6)

David Okoniewski – @oakcanoeski (shots 1 & 2)

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See our Acadia National Park products here: SHOP

Timberline Lodge and a Happy Couple

Here in the midst of a cold and rainy Oregon winter, Oregonians are always looking for joy. We found it in these engagement photos of Sarah and Jeffrey, who were married in 2015.

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The happy couple had their photos taken on Mt. Hood. Fittingly, they are is wrapped in a Pendleton blanket woven for Friends of Timberline. This nonprofit group is dedicated to the preservation and conservation of the historic Timberline Lodge (you can read more about the lodge’s fascinating history–and it is fascinating–here).

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We want to say thank-you and congratulations to Sarah and Jeffrey, who were kind enough to share their photos with us. The blanket’s striking monogram was done by a friend of the bride’s mother to commemorate the day of their wedding.

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If you’re interested in the Friends of Timberline blanket, please call the gift shop at 503-272-4436. We are always happy to monogram your blankets through our Woolen Mill Store.

Would you like a blanket to be part of your wedding? Find beautiful ideas here and on our Pinterest Weddings board.

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For you: Dia de los Muertos and Sugar Skulls

Dia de los Muertos, or the Day of the Dead, is celebrated on October 31st and November 1st and 2nd.  In Mexico, celebrants build ofrendas, altars to the deceased, with photos, candles, and the favorite foods of those who have moved on. In Brazil, families visit churches, then visit cemeteries. In Spain, celebrants enjoy festivals and parades throughout certain neighborhoods. Wherever the holiday is observed, the spirits of the departed are welcomed back to this world with specific symbols; calaveras (sugar skulls), masses of stylized flowers, and dressed skeletons.

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The roots of the holiday go back more than 3,000 years ago, to the age of the Aztecs and a ritual that celebrated the goddess Mictecacihuatl.  The skulls and flowers symbolized death and rebirth. In the 15th century, Spanish conquistadores were aghast at a ritual that seemed to mock death. In an attempt to make the ceremony more Christian, the Spaniards moved the event to All Saints’ Day, but the symbology remained, growing more fanciful and varied through the generations.

The central figure of our Day of the Dead blanket represents the colorful wooden skull masks or calacas that celebrants wear as they dance to honor their dead relatives. The wooden skulls, decorated sugar skulls and marigolds are placed at gravesites and altars for the departed. The blanket’s bright colors and festive images of flowers and mariachi musicians capture the spirit of the celebration. This blanket inspired a collaboration with GNU and Barrett Christie, which you can see and read about here: Women Who Shred 

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We have a related pattern called Sugar Skulls based on one of the elements in the Day of the Dead blanket. It’s used in fabric, an array of bags and Diego the bear. Our patterns capture the spirit of joyful welcome as celebrated by people all over the world during Dia de los Muertos.

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Rose City ‘Til I Die: Oregon Team, Oregon Blanket, Oregon Pride!

Pendleton Woolen Mills is proud to honor the Portland Timbers with a limited-edition blanket. The edition of 1,975 reflects the Timbers’ beginnings in 1975 as part of the North American Soccer League. Now part of Major League Soccer, the Timbers are cheered on by the Timbers Army, a European-style rooting section that sets the standard for team support in the MLS.

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The blanket’s designer, Laura Jost, used her bird’s eye view from the Timbers Army section as inspiration for a stylized representation of the beautiful game. The goalkeepers hang back as two teams converge on the heart of the Rose City, while flags wave, drums pound, colored smoke is released for each goal, and Timber Joey brandishes his chainsaw. Above it all, chant leaders lead the Timbers Army in their battle cry: Rose City ‘Til I Die.

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This hometown blanket will be available for preorder through our Pendleton Home Store and on our site starting today, October 8th. The actual blankets will arrive in plenty of time to be wrapped for gift-giving.

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This is your blanket for your team, with a design chosen by Timbers fans. A portion of sales will support Fields for All, a nonprofit alliance between the Timbers, Pendleton Woolen Mills and many more, devoted to creating safe, healthy playing surfaces for underserved communities. You can read about the unveiling of a field here: Fields for All Unveiling in Gresham, Oregon.

We asked Laura Jost, the blanket’s designer, to tell us a little about herself, and to describe her inspiration for this beautiful blanket.

Laura, can you tell us a little about yourself?

I was born in Portland and lived all over rural Oregon. My birthday is 9/18, usually very close to Pendleton Round-Up, so my cake usually had a frosting cowgirl or the like. I still love riding horses and the kids love that I am excellent at catching frogs. I moved back to Portland in 1995.

What drew you to the idea of designing a Pendleton blanket?

Pendleton is a brand that is very near to my heart. I drive past the mill and/or stop in every time I visit my parents. My mother instilled my love of Pendleton wools. I received my first blanket in grade school and I still have it: the Glacier National Park blanket. There is Pendleton wool in most rooms of my home; the kids each have a blanket, the throws and pillows in my living room, the blanket on our bed, our beach towels. They are works of art to me.

What’s your design background?

I don’t have a formal design background, but I was raised learning to sew, knit, and garden and I was always artistic: drawing, writing, painting, singing, dancing. I am technically a stay-at-home mom, though I don’t do much staying at home. I volunteer in various capacities at school, and I’m a freelance writer, regularly published in NW Kids Magazine. I love to work with fabric, customizing and sewing clothing for my family. I’m what most people call a jack-of-all-trades.

And now we come to the Portland Timbers. Tell us what the Timbers mean to you.

I have always been drawn to rooting for the “good guys” and that’s exactly what the Timbers feel like for me. The stadium experience just reinforces my love for the game. My husband teases me because I cheer for the players like I’m their mother. I love the camaraderie in the Army. I love the cheering to the very end, cheering even for the misses/good tries. I love the emotional high-fives and hugs when we score. I love watching the Timbers’ kids with their fathers out on the field at the end of the game. I love the celebration in it all. I love waking up the next morning a little hoarse. I just love it!

 When I saw the contest, I was at home sick for several days and did the preliminary layout and drawing to keep my mind busy while I was recovering. I wanted it to look like a Timbers match: the wild flags in the air, the sound of the drums, the colored goal smoke, the field, the players, the Army, the heart of the city and the love I have for Portland: even the little rosettes came to represent the chant leaders and Joey.

 When I looked at it, I saw a wild night of cheering on the home team at the top of your lungs, but it could never compare to innate beauty of a Pendleton, so my entry became just another paper on the counter. I almost didn’t send it in, but my son saw the drawing on the table just before the deadline and gasped, “Mommy, it’s so beautiful!” So, I had to send it in.

 I never thought in a million years I’d hear back from anyone! The fan voting was excruciating. I spent the last day hiding out with the kids as much as possible and when I saw the final numbers, I just couldn’t believe it. It’s still a little hard for me to believe. When I think about seeing a blanket in person, my stomach jumps!

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Ours too, Laura, ours too.

Remember, order soon. We expect the edition to sell out quickly, so please don’t wait. Order here: Timbers Blanket

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Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People

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September saw the opening of Portland’s Tilikum Crossing, the newest of Portland’s bridges. This one is special for a few reaasons. First, it’s a pedestrian/transit bridge that is only open to pedestrians, the MAX light rail line, buses, bicycles and emergency vehicles. Second, it is named in honor of the people who inhabited this area long before the Jacksons, Hawthornes and Morrisons. Tilikum is a Chinook jargon word that means “people, tribe or family.” It was chosen to honor the Multnomah, Cascade, Clackamas, and other Chinookan peoples who have been here as long as 14,000 years ago.

The name was chosen through an initial round of popular vote, with the final name being chosen by a Trimet committee. The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde were part of the bridge’s dedication, and donated artwork by Chinook artist Greg A. Robinson. The three pieces are collectively titled, “We Have Always Lived Here.”

Two basalt pillars stand at the east and west ends of the bridge. The bronze medallion, five feet in diameter, hangs at the eastern side of the bridge, facing north.  According to the tribe. “The basalt carvings depict Tayi, or headmen, with their people, and the medallion shows Morning Star and her children in the center, which is a reference to the heavens, and Coyote and the first humans on the outer ring, referencing the Earth.”

As part of the opening ceremony for the bridge, The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde commissioned a limited edition blanket from Pendleton Woolen Mills, incorporating the stunning artwork by Mr. Robinson.

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Each blanket bore this special patch.

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As we understand it, most of the commemorative blankets were given as gifts, and a small amount were sold on Tilikum Crossing’s opening day. We are so honored to have been asked to participate in this event.  Below, enjoy some shots from the bridge’s dedication, including those of the artist being wrapped in another Grand Ronde blanket, and some beautiful closeups of his work. Photos courtesy of Trimet.

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Greg Hatten’s Woodenboat Adventures: Rainier National Park’s Waterways

As we’ve mentioned before on this blog, our friend Greg Hatten, the WoodenBoat adventurer, is floating some of our country’s National Parks as part of the centennial celebration of the National Park Service. For this trip, he invited along Seth Patterson, an avid sportsman and photographer who happens to work at Pendleton.

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Greg is an accomplished guide and fisherman who splits his time between Missouri and Oregon. He is happiest on the river in his wooden drift boat, the Portola, built to the exact specs of the original Portola piloted by conservationist Martin Litton down the Colorado River in 1964 as part of a historic journey that helped save the Grand Canyon. Greg’s 2014 recreation of this journey is part of his larger commitment to our National Parks.

But this trip to Rainier National Park did not involve the Portola, as Greg explains his his blog post:

This park is special to me. I’ve admired it from a distance and experienced it up close.  I’ve hiked the trails, skied the slopes, climbed the mountain, slept up at cold Camp Muir, and enjoyed the cozy warmth of Paradise Lodge.  As familiar as I am with Rainier, I’ve never explored the waterways. Since it’s impossible to put a handcrafted wood drift boat into the trickling streams of the park in the early stages of their life cycles, I did my initial exploring by boot instead of by boat.

I picked the Cowlitz for my river experience. It’s the largest river of the six and named for the Native American Indian tribe that still calls this area “home.” I hiked up the path to the glacier that gives it life and then, just outside the park boundary, I fished it – with a favorite fly-fishing friend on his favorite stretch of that river.

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There was a time when Rick LeBlanc and I chased steelhead all over the Pacific Northwest – once even riding a historic old canyon train in the very Northeast corner of Oregon to catch wild winter steelhead as we struggled to keep the eyes of our fly rods from icing shut. Rick is a fisherman’s fisherman. Though it had been years since we were together on a river we wasted no time in picking up exactly where we left off – a brothers’ bond of rivers, fish, flimsy rods and fancy flies. 

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Yes, that’s our blanket under that fancy flyGreg’s Parks t-shirt is here and his Ranger Plaid Trail Shirt is here.

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And wouldn’t your camp coffee taste great from this mug?

You can read the rest of Greg’s post at his Woodenboat Adventure blog. It’s a thrilling ride with a satisfying conclusion, and wonderful photography of its own. We had so many terrific shots to choose from that we decided not to duplicate. Over at his blog, you can click on Greg’s photos to see the larger versions of each photo. It’s the next best thing to having your own fly fishing adventure in Rainier National Park.

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We’re looking forward to Greg’s next trip! Who knows where these wooden boats will take us?

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Read the full post: Greg Hatten at Rainier National Park

See Pendleton’s Rainier National Park gear: Rainier National Park

Photography: Many thanks to the mighty Seth Patterson

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Star Wars and Pendleton Blankets Unveiled for Force Friday

It was a wild party last night, as this shot from our friend Carrie shows.

10603789_10203657373675476_4087456737516796336_nOne of the highlights was the showing of our unveiling video. Give it a watch!

The unveiling that mattered was the blankets, of course. These works of art were designed by Derek Roberts, the gifted artist behind our incredibly popular NIKE N7 blanket. He’s a lifelong fan of Star Wars, and NIKE was kind enough to allow us to work with him on a project near and dear to his heart.

Here are the details. 1977 is a year that forever changed our perception of space, adventure and heroism. In commemoration, Pendleton has woven each blanket in a limited edition, hand-numbered series of 1,977. Each design is available as a single blanket, or as part of a matched-number set of four for the ultimate Star Wars collector.

1

A New Hope

Inspired by the iconic Star Wars poster. Luke Skywalker begins a journey that will change the galaxy, along with Han Solo, Princess Leia, and Darth Vader.

2

The Empire Strikes Back

Darth Vader and the storm troopers have regrouped after the destruction of the Death Star, with Darth Vader leading the hunt for Luke Skywalker.

3Return of the Jedi

Powering into light speed, Luke Skywalker heads a mission to rescue Han Solo from the clutches of Jabba the Hutt, and face Darth Vader one last time.

4The Force Awakens

If you dare, gaze upon a new Star Wars character from the dark side, with exclusive imagery from the newest chapter in the Star Wars saga.

All4The Ultimate Collector’s Set

Purchase a matched-number set of all four blankets. Available only through preorder and for a limited time.

You should preorder soon, as sets and singles are selling briskly for #ForceFriday. Single blankets will deliver 11/25/2015. Matched sets for the Ultimate Star Wars collector will deliver 10/31/2015.

Star Wars and Pendleton for #ForceFriday Fun. It’s on.

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Come to the party!

We’re closing down Portland’s NW Broadway on Thursday night to celebrate the preorder launch of our fantastic, amazing Star Wars Pendleton product. What’s this product, you ask? Well, we can’t even tell you until #ForceFriday officially begins, but here’s a hint: it’s limited-edition, iconically Pendleton and incredibly beautiful.

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No, this is not the product. You can’t see the product until #ForceFriday.

But don’t forget the party! We’re taking it to the streets!

On September 3rd , please join the #ForceFriday Block Party in front of our Home Store in Portland, Oregon’s Pearl District. The party will happen on Broadway between Davis and Everett streets. What to expect: food carts, costume party, street performers, classic cars, prizes, giveaways, music, movie clips and special appearances. Event goes from 10 P.M. to 1 A.M. Pre-orders for the special product start September 4th at 12:01 A.M.

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No, this is not the product, either. But it’s so cool that you have to come to the party, yes?

Best of all? If you come to the party, you enter for a chance to win an Ultimate Collector’s set of Pendleton Star Wars product, all yours.

If you want to see the product in person, you need to come to the party; or, you can see photos at our website at http://www.pendleton-usa.com . Preorder there, too!

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This is not the special product, either. This is your invitation. Use it.

Star Wars. Pendleton. Star Wars…Pendleton…Star Wars! Pendleton! YES!

Can you tell we’re excited? More information on Facebook.