Running Wild and Scenic with Greg Hatten and OPB

Editor’s note: Our friend and brand ambassador, Greg Hatten, will be featured on Oregon Field Guide this Thursday, March 7th. Greg was part of a wild and scenic river trip led by Jeremy Starr. Enjoy his words about what’s behind the episode, and be sure to tune in! “Oregon Field Guide” airs Thursday evenings at 8:30 p.m. and repeats Sundays at 1:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. In the Mountain Time zone of Eastern Oregon, the program airs at 9:30 p.m. Thursdays, and at 7:30 p.m. Sundays. Enjoy!

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There are 209 rivers in the United States protected by the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. Oregon has 58 of those which, when added together, equal almost 2,000 miles of protected, scenic river.

The Rogue River was one of the original eight rivers inducted into the program and is one of my favorites in the state of Oregon. We run it at least once a year – me and the band of rowers I run with. Our group of river runners is diverse and highly skilled in the arts of rowing, problem solving, outdoor adventure, camping, knot tying, open-fire cooking, fly fishing, river rescue and other handy skills.

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(see blanket here)

A few months ago, on the 50th Anniversary of that legislation, we invited Oregon Public Broadcasting to join us on a tribute trip as we tipped our hats and raised our glasses to the river runners who came before us on the Rogue and charted a course we are privileged to follow every Fall.

For this trip I was privileged to row a replica boat with a design that originated in the early 1940’s – on loan from Roger Fletcher who helped build the boat that’s a perfect twin of the original double-ender on display under the shelter behind Paradise Lodge on the Wild and Scenic Rogue. Rowing a boat with such a history on this tribute trip was pretty amazing.  (I returned it to Roger after the trip in the same shape as when I picked it up – whew).

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 As we wrapped our hands around the worn handles of our oars and pushed off from Graves Creek on an early morning last October, we were immediately swept into that “other” world of white water, jagged rocks, technical rapids, steep green mountains, and a connection with history. Our boats became time machines once again and took us back to an era where the boats were wood, the bears patrolled the river banks and otters barked at intruders. These wild and scenic rivers plunge us into a wilderness which seems as untouched and raw today as I imagine them one hundred years ago.

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Since the winds of the west blew us together fifteen years ago, our group has rowed thousands of river miles and several thousands rapids. There is a rhythm to our routine which is second nature and familiar even though it can be months between trips.

The Oregon Field Guide crew of three had their own rhythm, having shot thousands of hours of outdoor footage together. Their heavy cameras and assorted gear was as weathered as our own river gear and showed the signs of being dragged up mountains, down rivers, and through forests all over the Pacific Northwest.

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Both groups meshed well together from the very beginning. We shared a mission on this trip to connect people to the Rogue River and celebrate its history. We wanted to pay homage to the river runners of the Rogue even before there was a Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. We hoped to take viewers back to a time of wood boats and wilderness where they could smell the campfires and feel the dew at first light on the river.

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(see blanket here)

So when I was asked the question, with a microphone in my face and the camera’s rolling, “Why is it so important to keep these wild places wild?” imagine my disappointment when I opened my mouth and nothing came out. I froze. In my big moment to drive the point home and talk about why these rivers should be protected I stumbled and stuttered and could not form a complete sentence with all the points rattling around in my head.

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photo by Dave Zielinski

I wanted to talk about how small and vulnerable we all feel when faced with the challenge of rowing a difficult rapid in such a wild and remote place. I meant to compare the vulnerability of our boats to our wild rivers and remind people that if you take your eye off the ball for even a second when rowing a boat you will lose it. Same with these wild rivers. Take your eye off the river and someone will be there to exploit it with a casino, a helicopter, a dam, a tram, mining rights, and any number of things that would compromise its character and make it less wild.

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photo by Dave Zielinski

These wild and scenic rivers are beautiful, natural, rugged, and incredible reminders of how spectacular the wilderness can be when it is undeveloped. We need these wild places as sanctuaries to visit and connect with nature in a state of raw and wild beauty. Selfishly, we want these rivers to stay wild and scenic so we can challenge our skills as river runners and outdoor enthusiasts in an environment that is primitive and demanding.

photos by Jayson Hayes

We want to be able to pass this gift of unspoiled wilderness along to our children’s children – so we will continue to keep our eye on the ball to preserve our boats and our rivers just like the river stewards who came before us. When the Oregon Field Guide camera was rolling I was unable to find the words, but am quite sure the pictures and video will have a far greater impact than anything I could’ve said anyway.

You’ll have to watch the program to find out!

Greg Hatten

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Wild & Scenic Rivers Part One with Greg Hatten and Pendleton

Note: Please enjoy this guest post from Greg Hatten, of WoodenBoat adventure fame. He took some Pendleton blankets along on his latest river runs. Here’s his write-up!

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Wild and Scenic Rivers Act

“The great purpose of this act is to set aside a reasonable part of the vanishing wilderness, to make certain that generations of Americans yet unborn will know what it is to experience life on undeveloped, unoccupied land in the same form and character as the Creator fashioned it… It is a great spiritual experience. Unless we preserve some opportunity for future generations to have the same experience, we shall have dishonored our trust.”
Senator Frank Church (1957-1981)

In 1968, Congress passed the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act and President Johnson signed it into law. The primary goal was to “protect and preserve certain rivers with outstanding natural, cultural, and recreational values in a free-flowing condition for the enjoyment of present and future generations.”

Eight rivers were inducted in the original group and, now, fifty years later, there are over 200 rivers in the program. The state of Oregon has more protected rivers than any other state by far – with over 50 included in the program.

In honor of the 50th Anniversary of that legislation, I’m running several of the classic rivers that are under its protection in 2018.

Continue reading

Celebrating the Solstice and Summer

We are celebrating the Summer Solstice and the beginning of Summer with Kristen Frasca, one of our newest brand ambassadors. Kristen is a jewelry maker, graphic designer and photographer based in Nashville, TN. She has impeccable style, which shows in these summery shots.

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Nothing says summer like a picnic. It’s the perfect way to relax in nature; spread a blanket, unpack your feast and toast to the months ahead.

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Warrior Rock Wristlet

Our picnic is happening on one of our new blankets for 2017–the Compass Point throw, which coordinates with the Compass Point bedding collection. This USA-made wool throw features a contemporary design in neutral hues, anchored by a repeating pattern of crosses. Each arm of the Greek cross reaches toward one of earth’s four corners, pointing the way to adventure, wealth, knowledge and relaxation. The Compass Point bed blanket is beautiful, too!

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Compass Point wool throw

We’re always surprised when people say they’d never picnic on a Pendleton blanket. It takes some shaking out, but it’s actually good for your blanket to use it. It’s the best way there is to avoid moth damage. Wool blankets are thick, protective, insulating, and most spills bead up and shake right off, thanks to lanolin and the other amazing and natural properties of wool.

And for those of you who are worried about dampness, you can always check out our Pendleton roll-up blankets. These are backed with water-resistant materials.

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Yes, Pendleton Hats are a perfect way to keep the summer sun out of your eyes. We have some fabulous new hat styles at the link, in colors you’ll love.

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Escondido Tote

Hey there, goofy girl. This is Kristen’s Siberian Husky, Winter. It’s fine to crash the picnic when you’re this friendly and cute. And the Escondido Tote is a sophisticated and roomy tote that will hold everything but the dog, of course.

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Acadia Park Featherweight Scarf

And now, let’s talk about that beautiful wrap. It’s the perfect summer layer; a Featherweight Scarf, generously sized, light-as-air in soft, silky mercerized wool in our Acadia National Park stripe. It is sizable enough to wrap you head-to-foot with the softest layer of smooth, airy wool. It’s also completely easy to wear around your neck, due to the whisper-thin fabric. It’s also available in Yosemite National Park Stripe–giving you a stripe for each coast.

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So, welcome Summer! We wish you months of adventures.

You can see more of Kristen’s work here:  www.kristenfrasca.com

Instagram –  @kristenfrasca    @winterthesiberian

 

Jessica Enjoys Pendleton Athleisure Wear–on sale May 1st & 2nd

Pendleton leisure/sleep/lounge wear is on sale today and tomorrow;  use code RELAX at checkout at www.pendleton-usa.com.

To show you our athleisure in action, here is Jessica Lindsey of Edge Movement Arts, posing near the St. Johns Bridge in Portland, Oregon. Along with the beautiful photos, Jessica talks about her path and her approach to teaching yoga. 

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I went through my initial yoga instructor certification and started teaching in 2008.  I had been practicing various forms yoga since 1999.  I initially started doing yoga after I tore my ACL in a dance performance and needed a gentle way to heal my body after I had surgery to repair it.  Yoga allowed me to slowly ease into finding movement and range of motion after months of limited mobility, muscle atrophy, and an abundance of scar tissue post-surgery.

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It was a slow process and I thought I was just doing it for the physical benefits at the time, but after each session I would feel so grounded and calm, like all the troubles of life and the world where somehow less significant or important.  That is what really convinced me that yoga was something that I needed to have in my life long-term. Yoga changed me physically – longer, leaner, and more flexible use of my muscles, but it was the changes in how I experienced the world in a more joyful and positive way that feel the most significant now.

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When I returned to my dance career I found that I had so much more awareness of what it meant to exist and be in my body, how to express with my body. As I went down the path of training to be a competitive ballroom dancer (or as we call it in the ballroom world, a “Dancesport Athlete”) I found yoga’s ability to create calm, centered energy helped to balance out the fire of being a competitive athlete.

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Dance is my expressing outwardly to the world – doing part, yoga is  my receiving, letting go and simply being part!  Or to put it more simply…. Dance is Doing, Yoga is Being!

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I draw from many different bodies of knowledge to influence what I offer to my students.  Sometimes a classic “yoga asana” or pose is in order, other times I draw from the Chinese energy meridian system, from fascial and kinesiological stretching techniques, and other times from my knowledge from years working in veterinary surgery and the biomechanics of mammalian injury and recovery.

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I am a body knowledge geek.  I can spend hours researched the interconnected relationships of why stretching your foot will make your shoulder feel better, or why that tender spot on your thigh could mean that your liver is out of balance.  The body is this beautiful puzzle and each person’s life experiences have shaped every inch of the person I see standing before me in a group class or a private session.

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I recognize that no two people are the same and that no single variation of a pose is going to work for everyone.  How could it? No one else has lived the life you have lived in the exact beautiful, crazy, messy way that you have.  I honor that, see that, and try to the best of my ability to create an environment and a practice that lets my students own their personal freedom to choose what is right for them.

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The most important aspects of how I decided what to wear when doing yoga are in no particular order:

Do I look good in it? By that I mean that when I look in the mirror I feel it is flattering  and makes me feel good about myself.

Does it move well with me? there is nothing worse then a pair of yoga pants that feel like they are falling down or do not give me full range of motion. So really good stretch and cut are important.

Is the fabric comfortable and breathable and odor-resistant? Since I am physically active all day long in my professional life, it is so important that my clothing feels nice to exist in, and that it stays fresh all day long.

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Great yoga clothing needs to be multipurpose. My favorite items are those that look good, feel good, and fit well not only during my practice, but when I greet new clients, and then go have a meal with friends.

Our men’s sleepwear and athleisure is available with the same discount: use the code RELAX at pendleton-usa.com.

Enjoy your week, and relax.

 

 

 

Brand Ambassador Profile: Brandon Burk

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(outerwear)

Brandon, tell us a little about where you live and what you do.

I reside in Salt Lake City, Utah with my beautiful wife Leia and two daughters, Ella (4) and Eden (2).  I specialize in wedding portraiture, family portraiture and product photography. Photography is my full time job. I enjoy creating everyday. I am extremely organized, meticulous and detail oriented.

I love exploring the great outdoors. I love hiking, A-frame cabins, leather goods, mountains, ranches, lakes, canoes and evergreen trees. I rarely go anywhere without my camera, tripod, and Toyota FJ Cruiser.

Photography Experience: 10 years

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(socks)

What drew you to photography? Was it always your passion?

Growing up I always loved to express my creativity. My junior year of high school I took a photography course where I learned to shoot and process film. After high school I served a two-year mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I was located in Atlanta, Georgia during that time. In Atlanta, I focused full-time on serving the Lord. After my return home I started doing photography as my occupation and the rest was history.

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(wool shirts)

How did you learn your craft?

 I started my photography career working at a upscale photography studio in my early twenties. No college – just hands on experience. The photographer I worked under had been in the business for some 25 years. While I was working at the studio, I was simultaneously building my own clientele on the side. Once I had enough clients, I left the studio to work my own photography business full-time.

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(socks)

Your photos have a refined sense of arrangement and composition. How long does it take you to set up a shot?

A set up for a product photo can take anywhere from 15 minutes to a full hour. Flat lay photography definitely takes longer. Over the last year I have also created pieces where the product and elements are built upward, vertically – I call them “Vertical Builds”. The key here is to build different visual levels: high, low and medium height levels. I did a flat lay photography job for my good friends over at Clif Bar where I spent around one hour setting up each photograph in addition to the 30 hours searching antique shops and Ebay for all the vintage items I used in my set up. You can view my Clif Bar photos here .

BrandonBurkPhotography.com

(wool shirts)

Do you have any advice for people who look up to you?

I would advise to work hard at your craft, pay attention to the smallest details, be original and create often.

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(blanket)

That is wonderful advice. What draws you to Heritage brands?

Heritage brands are classic and timeless. They never go out of style. Made in America manufacturing is important to me. I love the quality of workmanship that comes with a good Heritage brand.

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(outerwear)

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 What is the secret to the distinctive and warm look of your photography (or as much of the secret as you’d like to share)?

Some key items that make up my style of photography on my Instagram account. Lighting, attention to detail, warm brown tones, reclaimed wood and adventurous vibes.

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(blanket)

Are there other photographers you admire that we should check out?

One of my favorite photographers is Roberto Dutesco. He photographs wild horses. I love how it’s his sole focus. Website: dutescoart.com

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(blanket)

What do you love most about Instagram?

I have always loved creating. Instagram is the perfect way for sharing my creativity to the world. I also love being able to see what others are creating. Instagram has been a great way to improve and sharpen my photography skills. I am able to analyze which photographs my following like best and continue to create imagery based around that.

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(blanket)

 What made you decide to showcase your sense of fashion on Instagram?

I first started my account showcasing some of my scenic and portraiture work. As I continued to spend more time on Instagram, I started to network and follow other people posting their sense of style and threads. It slowly evolved into me starting to do the same.

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(blanket)

Where do you find inspiration?

One person who inspires me is Albert Einstein. He had the most incisive mind! I love his creativity and unique way of thinking. I am also inspired by a lot of what I see on Instagram. It’s amazing how much better of a photographer Instagram can make you. Every image you put out there is a open critique for the world to see, comment, like or dislike etc.

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(blanket)

What have you learned from creating your art?

There are people who do art to do art and then there are people who do art to make a living. As artists a lot of us are perfectionists. We want to hang onto our art and work on it for days and months making it perfect. We have a hard time letting go of it. To be a full time artist and make a living at doing so, you have to learn to let go of your art – get the job done and move onto the next one.

BrandonBurkPhotography.com

(pillows)

What are some of your favorite Pendleton pieces?

I love the Chief Joseph Blankets – I use these all the time on portrait session.

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I also love my Pendleton pillows and my Sky Stone Turquoise Gorge Jacket.

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(outerwear)

Website: BrandonBurkPhotography.com

Instagram:@BrandonBurkPhotography & @UtahWeddingPhotographer

Facebook: facebook.com/brandonburkphotography