Nike N7 and The College Fund blanket for 2019 – 7 Generations

7 Generations

7 Generations wool blanket by Pendleton for the College Fund.

We are proud to present “7 Generations,” the latest blanket in the American Indian College Fund Collection which helps fund scholarships for Native American students. “7 Generations” is also our newest partnership with Nike’s N7 Fund, a trust whose mission is to bring sports to Native American and Aboriginal communities in the US and Canada.

Decoding the Symbols

Front and back views of the new N7/College Fund blanket by Pendleton

This USA-made wool blanket illustrates the past, present and future of Native peoples. The central N7 motif represents the impact of each person (the diamond) on the three generations before and after (arrows). A storm pattern with zigzags of lightning honors heritage, while steps show the path to overcoming life’s challenges. The rich colors were inspired by traditional dyes, and reflect the beauty of the southwestern landscape.

The Designer

Designer Tracie Jackson sits on a stage wearing Nike N7 gear she designed.

This blanket was designed by Tracie Jackson, a Diné artist and designer from Star Mountain in the Navajo Nation. She is a 4th generation artisan. Her grandparents and mother are silversmiths, and both her maternal great grandmothers are rug weavers. Her family encouraged her to study the traditional art forms of her tribe, and with their support she became a painter, jeweler, beader, and graphic designer.

Tracie studied design at the University of Oregon and currently works in Portland, Oregon, designing for the Nike N7 program. This has been her dream job since she was 14 years old, when she first saw N7 at a Native basketball tournament. “I was taught to get an education and use it to help our Native community, which pushed me to become a designer for N7.”

Photos and Models

7 Native American women on a raised platform dressed in Nike clothing and shoes.

The photos of this collection are fantastic. You’ll notice that the designer and her models–athletes, leaders and activists–are holding shutter buttons, and choosing how to represent themselves in these photographs by taking their own shots. We are proud to be part of this.

See and Learn More

Please go see the entire collection here: Nike N7 collection

See the “7 Generations” blanket here: 7 Generations

Pendleton label with bald eagle: "Pendleton since 1863 Highest Quality Made in the USA."

 

Let it Rain – with Pendleton

Seven waterproof rain boots with Pendleton national park designs.

Oregon Rain

We don’t let the rain slow us down in Oregon. Pendleton’s corporate headquarters is in Portland, Oregon, in the Pacific Temperate Rainforest Zone. (Learn about that here: the Pacific Temperate Rainforest zone.) We see an average of 43 inches of rainfall each year, so we know rain.

woman in Pendleton rain slicker and boots standing on a dock

Pendleton Rain Products

That’s why we’re super excited about our rain products, including the Pendleton rain boots (in two heights!) and our rainwear. We stay rain ready with waterproof jackets and ponchos that feature sealed seams and fun linings with Pendleton patterns and National Park Stripes.

See them here: Pendleton rain boots

You can see all the women’s rainwear here: Women’s rainwear by Pendleton

Our new women’s waterproof wool coats combine our expertise in wool AND rain! Enjoy the benefits of wool—warmth, beauty, breathability—with the added bonus of seam-seal technology and a waterproof finish. The clean, simple lines make this the perfect coat to throw on every day!

See them here:

Waterproof wool coat by Pendleton, hooded

Waterproof wool coat by Pendleton, stand collar

A man, a child, and a woman crossing a cobblestone street wearing Pendleton rain coats.

The entire family can be rain ready with a men’s jacket and a new kid-sized slicker.

See them here: Kid’s Long Beach Raincoat

Men’s Pacific Raincoat

Accessories

We have a fantastic line of waterproof Canopy Canvas accessories that are bright, practical, and oh-so-waterproof. These lightweight, durable bags are designed to protect whatever you carry–not only on rainy days.

See them here: Canopy Canvas- totes, bags & more

So don’t let raindrops slow you down. Get out there and enjoy the rain; after all, it keeps the world green.

A woman in a field wearing a red Pendleton rain poncho.

All About Shetland Wool

Shetland Sweaters

At Pendleton, we are mighty proud of our Shetland wool sweaters for men and women. Here are a few facts about Shetland wool, and why it makes our sweaters so special.

Folded stack of Shetland wool sweaters by Pendleton

photo by Pendleton Woolen Mills

The Source: Shetland Sheep

Shetland wool comes from a special breed of Shetland sheep   https://www.shetland-sheep.org/about-shetlands/shetland-wool/  that originated on Scotland’s Shetland Islands. In November 2011, Shetland wool that is still produced in the Shetlands earned a designation of “Native Shetland Wool.”

a Shetland sheep

Photo by Claudiu Pusuc on Unsplash

Like everything else in this day and age, Shetland sheep have migrated. Pendleton’s Shetland wool is from New Zealand, a country known for humane treatment of sheep.

Shetland is spun to be lofty, so you get maximum insulation with minimum weight.

Shetland yarn doesn’t have guard hairs, like many other yarns, meaning it is surprisingly nice next to your skin.

Woman in blue Pendleton sweater stands in front of lake

photo by Pendleton Woolen Mills

Shetland sweaters wear well with little-to-no pilling. If you see a sweater with suede patches at the elbow, it’s probably a well-loved, well-worn Shetland.

Some Shetland yarns are solid colored, and some are heathered. We tend to choose heathers for our sweaters. With their flecks and blended tones, they are so visually interesting.

stack of folded men's Shetland sweaters by Pendleton

photo by Pendleton Woolen Mills

Pendleton Shetland

Pendleton has a variety of styles for men and women at our website. You can see them here:

Pendleton Shetland Sweaters for Women

Pendleton Shetland Sweaters for Men

Whether you’re feeling the Fall chill, or doing a little early holiday shopping, come see what we have to offer.

Man wearing green pendleton Shetland wool sweater stands in front of lake

photo by Pendleton Woolen Mills

 

 

Iconic Pendleton Patterns: Stripes

Pendleton Stripes

In our last post, we talked about Shelter Bay, a pattern that combines our camp stripes with the motif from one of our most popular blankets, San Miguel (read the post here: Shelter Bay). Part of that pattern’s beauty lies in its camp striped borders.

blonde man and brunette woman seated in front of a window, wrapped in a pendleton Camp Stripe blanket. Woman is holding a cup of coffee.

photo by Cassy Berry

Pendleton’s camp stripe blankets are popular, and not just for their utilitarian history. Camp stripes bring the spirit of the outdoors to whatever they grace, thanks to colors that reflect Western landscapes: forests, lakes, river gorges, coastal crags, and the rich colors of the high desert. These stripes find their way to home goods and apparel, especially outdoor shirts and warm outerwear.  See them here: Camp Stripes

But what about our other stripes?

Serape Stripes

With their bands of contrasting colors, serape stripes are designed to dazzle.

Pendleton serape stripe blankets hanging on pegs, next to a stack of folded Pendleton serape stripe blankets

 

photo by Pendleton Woolen Mills

Traditional serapes (called sarapes south of the border) are colorful, sturdy blanket shawls that were part of life in the Mexican home. A serape could serve as a tablecloth, bedding, impromptu hammock, or improvised tent. It could be worn as a shawl, or converted to a poncho. Clothing, bedding, shelter: the serape was versatile!

When southern California’s surfers made trips to Baja, Mexico, to ride the waves, they brought home serape blankets and Baja jackets. The serape stripe became part of the “Endless Summer” of American surf culture. Pendleton’s serape stripes are found on shirts, jackets, hoodies, and bold wool blankets that are perfect for the beach, the porch, or the park.

Man standing on beach wearing striped overshirt.

photo by Danielle Visco

In the Southwestern United States, Pendleton serapes are also known as “Goopesala,” or “Good Blankets.” They are often used in the Give-Away Ceremony, performed at honor dances, weddings and many other occasions. Hosts give gifts to their guests, with no expectation of return. “What is given away returns to the giver, in another form of good.”

Archival photo from early 1900s of a Navajo family (father, mother, three young children) riding in a wagon with a Pendleton serape stripe blanket

photo: Pendleton Archives

In this photo from the Pendleton archives, a Pueblo family rides in one of the original wagons like those used by the Babbitt brothers, five shopkeepers who came west in 1886 to make their mark. They founded the CO Bar cattle ranch, in addition to opening a mercantile in Flagstaff, Arizona. In time, their success with commerce equaled their success with cattle. Over the next 100 years, the Babbitts owned and operated over twenty trading posts, doing business with the Navajo, Hopi and Apache peoples. Babbitt’s is still active and thriving—and working with Pendleton.

See our serapes here: Serape Stripe Blankets

Park Stripes

Some are bold, some are busy, but every National Park stripe blanket celebrates America’s Treasures, with a portion of sales supporting the work of the National Park Foundation.

Kyle_Houck_NP_CraterLake_Home (2)

photo by Kyle Houck

Here are a few fun facts about Pendleton National Park blankets:

  • The oldest design, Glacier Park, originally had “points” to give it the feel of an old-time “candy stripe” blanket traded by fur trappers, but the fur trade had ceased long before Pendleton began weaving blankets.
  • Any Pendleton National Park blanket with points was made before 1938. These marks referred to blanket size, and as the blankets grew in length and width, the points became inaccurate.
  • Pendleton has made blankets for 17 different parks. Two blankets, Crater Park and Shasta, are mysteries. They are listed but not pictured in archival sales materials, and there are no surviving examples.
  • Pendleton introduced plaid National Park throws after World War II. There were four different Grand Canyon plaid throws in those days, plus a newer one introduced in 2009.
  • Part of a National Park blanket’s appeal is its striped simplicity, but some older blankets featured mountains, pine trees, flowers—even a stylized Thunderbird.

Photo taken in Glacier National Park of a man and woman in front of a glacier, wrapped in a Pendleton Glacier National Park blanket

Photo by Kristen Irey

Park stripes are not just for blankets anymore. Their bold colors and happy associations make them a natural to wear and use each and every day. Park stripes prove their versatility in farmhouses, industrial spaces, ranch homes, tiny houses, lake cabins, tents, yurts and trailers! Wherever you live, park stripes are right at home.

See them here: Park Blankets

Which stripe is your favorite?

PWM_USA_label

Shelter Bay – Where it All Comes Together

Bed with Shelter bay Pendleton blanket. Blanket is brown with navy, tan and red stripes, and large tan central cross, with smaller crossed in corners.

Introducing Shelter Bay

One of our more popular 2019 blanket introductions is Shelter Bay (see more information here: Shelter Bay).

Shelter Bay

Shelter Bay sits in the upper corner of the Pacific Northwest, where the North Fork of the Skagit River empties into Washington State’s Puget Sound. This place of teeming waters and temperate weather invites wanderers to experience the great outdoors; camping by the shore, paddling a kayak, sitting by a campfire telling stories that drift up into the starry night sky. An earthtone background lit by luminous directional crosses represents the balanced, harmonious meeting of ocean, bay, land and sky in Shelter Bay.

This blanket is a unique combination of two popular designs. The first is the motif adapted from our San Miguel blanket (click to see it here: San Miguel). We enlarged the cross, and used it on a heathered ground that’s a derived from our popular Yakima Camp Blankets (see them here: Camp blankets). These attractive utilitarian blankets were based on the ombre-striped bedrolls used by cattle hands and shepherds. During the day, they were rolled tightly and fastened to saddles or packs. At night, they were unrolled for sleeping under the stars.

two beds in a log building by a window. Beds are covered with Pendleton Yakima Camp blankets, one green with stripes, one red with stripes.

Camp Blankets

Our camp blankets were originally woven from spare mill goods, and their heathered beauty was almost accidental, as it was derived from mill waste–yarn leftovers. Now, the blankets are part of the regular mill production schedule, and are woven according to an exacting weaver’s recipe. What’s that? A recipe is a specific combinations of yarns that produces a specific textile. Everything about the yarn, down to the sheep from which it originates, factors into the final result.

Our heathered blankets are popular, and we’ve been using them as inspiration in more than just the camp blanket line. Last year, we debuted the Olympic National Park Blanket in a grey heather with stripes. Like the Camp blankets, this one is the same on both sides.

But as the upper right corner of the photo below shows you, Shelter Bay is a little fancier. It’s woven on a jacquard loom, and the reverse is tan with earth-tone crosses. This gives you two dramatically different looks in one beautiful blanket.

Shelter_Bay_Blanket

Accessories and more

Shelter Bay is more than just a beautiful bedding group. We adapted the design for an accessories group. Some of the pieces use the stripe, others use the cross, and some use both. See what’s available at our website: Shelter Bay Accessories

Pendleton bag, scar and hat sitting on a wooden table against a shiplap background.

And if that’s still not enough Shelter Bay for you, check out this beautiful cardigan sweater. It’s a lambswool blend, and has cool forearm patches.

man wearing brown pendleton cardigan standing in front of lake

See it here: Shelter Bay Cardigan

The weather has changed, and you’re ready for wool. That’s a favorite time of year around here, so we want to wish you a happy Fall from Pendleton.

 

Gifts of Honor for Public Servants

Madeline Albright onstage at Portland's Arlene Schnitzer Center for the Performing arts, receiving a Pendleton Brave Star blanket

Honoring Madeline Albright

Pendleton’s Brave Star blanket was presented to Madeleine Albright on Tuesday, September 10, 2019, when Madame Secretary kicked off the Hatfield Lecture Series for the Oregon Historical Society. She spoke to a sold-out crowd at the Arlene Schnitzer Auditorium in Portland, Oregon.

Pendleton Brave Star wool blanket in red white and blue

BRAVE STAR

This contemporary interpretation of the American flag is a celebration of the patriotism of Native Americans. In 1875 Indian scouts carried messages from fort to fort in the West. Native American soldiers saw action with Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders in Cuba. And soldiers from many tribes battled in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf and Iraq. Five Native Americans have been awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery “above and beyond the call of duty.” The design marries modern asymmetry and vintage Americana. The unique striations, using pulled out yarns, reflect an era when dyes were made from plants.

See it here: Brave Star Blanket

Honoring Ted Kulongoski

Former Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski received “The Few, the Proud” Marine Corps blanket at the Madeleine Albright dinner at Oregon Historical Society from State Senators Betsy Johnson and Elizabeth Steiner Hayward.

Former Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski receiving a Pendleton Marines blanket at the Oregon Historical Society

This blanket features the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps, woven in a wool blanket to honor the valor and loyalty of the Marines.

Pendleton Marines blanket feaaturing the logo of the USMC, red white and blue

The Few, The Proud

The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. Each element signifies the Marine Corps mission and legacy. The anchor reflects the naval tradition of the Marines as part of the Department of the Navy. The globe represents readiness to serve in any part of the world. The bald eagle, symbol of America, holds a ribbon in its beak that reads “Semper Fidelis,” or “Always Faithful,” a reference to the unending valor and loyalty of the Corps. Dyed, woven and hand-finished in America for quality that’s second to none.

See it here: Marines blanket

PWM_USA_label

Fall 2019: Win a Ginew Heritage Coat on Instagram!

A Native American model stands facing the camera, with his denim Ginew jacket held open to show the Pendleton patterned wool lining.

A Native American model stands in profile, wearing a Ginew jacket with the collar turned up to show that the under-collar is lined in Pendleton patterned wool.

Ginew x Pendleton

This Ginew Heritage Coat (lined in Pendleton wool) can be yours! We are proud to partner with GINEW, a Native-owned premium denim brand, on a giveaway over at our Instagram.

To quote Ginew’s site:

In designing the Ginew Heritage Coat, we recreated a meaningful garment as it was worn by our grandfathers and great-grandfathers in daily life. By exploring our Anishinaabe and Oneida heritages, we came to appreciate their rich history of work and dedication. When we wrap ourselves in this coat, we wrap ourselves in the ways of our ancestors. The premium, American-made materials of our Heritage Coat are not just wool, cotton and brass; they are oral histories, old photographs, and traditional lore. Coats such as these were more than mere garments: they were work tools, worn in the machine shops, forests, and fields by relatives who dedicated themselves to the hard labor of providing for their families.

This is a 7-day giveaway, and the entry period runs from Thursday, September 26th  2019 at 9:00 AM PST, to Monday, September 30th 2019 at 11:59 PM PST.  The rest of the rules are after the jump.

Learn More

See our past posts about Ginew here: Pendleton and Ginew

Read more about Ginew here: Ginew Heritage Coat

Find our Instagram here: @pendletonwm on Instagram

Continue reading

Seven Decades of Women’s Style with Pendleton

A Seven Decade Celebration

We celebrated seventy years of classic Pendleton style for women on September 9, 2019 at our downtown Portland store. A fantastic time was had by all.

Interior of Pendleton store with row of mannequins wearing vintage Pendleton women's clothing

This Fall’s women’s line has a capsule of archive-inspired pieces, so we brought out the original garments and some other favorites to show how good design is timeless–and a lot of fun.

People were transfixed by the details.

customer in Pendleton store reading placard describing pendleton vintage clothing

customer in Pendleton store wearing white gloves as she inspects the hem of a Pendleton vintage skirt

Special Treats

The catering was excellent! We want to thank Delilah’s Catering for getting into the spirit of the party and helping us design a menu that reflected the best of decades past. We also hope guests enjoyed the special cocktail developed just for us–“The 49’er”, of course!

refreshments at party in Pendleton store: deviled eggs, petit fours, fruit skewers, paper plates, serving tongs

vintage pendleton ad of woman on bicycle placard with hole in face area where customers can put their own faces

We were delighted to see people wearing vintage Pendleton pieces and caught photos of a few, including this beautiful reversible skirt in tartan red and cream.

woman in red Pendleton skirt studies vintage pendleton clothing at pendleton store party, including 2009 Opening Ceremony coat

Lindy Dancers Cut Loose

This plaid wool western shirt on one of the Lindy Society Dancers is a classic. And we think the navy plaid skirt is Pendleton, too!

Linday Hop dancers dancing on sidewalk in front of pendleton store, one woman, two men

The Portland Lindy Society dancers set the tone of the evening. Their swing music put everyone in the mood to celebrate.

Lindy Hop dancers on sidewalk in front of Pendleton store, dancing, one woman, one man

crowd of people inside Pendleton store at party

customers studying Pendleton vintage clothing at pendleton store

Food, gifts, dancers, cocktails and music. What more could you ask for? Thank you to everyone who joined in the fun and made this a success.

Here’s to seventy more!

round seal that marks celebration of pendleton womenswear's 70th anniversay, includes "celebrating pendleton womenswear 70 years of style - 1949 - 2019

We’ve got New Pendleton Shoes for Fall 2019- would you like a pair?

Women's Pendleton shoes in black, white and grey wool, on a grey plaid blanket.

Who doesn’t like new shoes?

We are SO EXCITED about our new shoe line, and we hope you are, too. You can see some styles here: Pendleton Shoes

Man and woman sitting at table wearing Pendleton shoes/boots.These beautiful styles for men and women are everything you could hope for, for style, comfort, quality and authentic Pendleton wool.

Man's feet wearing Pendleton boots in suede and wool..

A Giveaway

To celebrate, we’re having a giveaway on our Instagram. Giveaway starts Thursday 9/12 and runs through Thursday 9/19. Click here to learn more, and to enter starting THURSDAY 9/12/19.

Pendleton Instagram

Rules are after the jump.

Continue reading

It’s a Pendleton party! Come Join us this Friday, 9/6/19!

Seven Decades

Fall 2019 marks seven decades of style from Pendleton. And we are having a party!

The event details are here: Seven Decades of Style party

You can also register at Eventbrite: Pendleton party, Seven Decades of Style

08_2019_PAW_70th_Anniversary_V3.inddWe can’t wait to share the archive inspirations for this year – vintage clothes are encouraged, so put on your ’49er, bring a friend and have a blast.

 

See you there!