Happy 100th to the Grand Canyon – free admission on August 25th!

I don’t believe that anyone can see the Grand Canyon area for themselves and not know that we have to do everything we can to protect it for future generations.

–Nolan Gould

woman with ponytail wrapped in Pendleton Grand Canyon blanket stands on the rim of the Grand Canyon

On August 25, 2019, the Grand Canyon celebrates its centennial with free admission to one of the seven wonders of the natural world.

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Yes, that’s right, on August 25th, you can experience these wonders for free.

The wonders of the Grand Canyon cannot be adequately represented in symbols of speech, nor by speech itself. The resources of the graphic art are taxed beyond their powers in attempting to portray its features. Language and illustration combined must fail.

– John Wesley Powell

This marvel of geology is just one of the recipients of Pendleton’s national park fundraising efforts. Through sales of our own and collaborative projects, we have been raising money to help restore the Grand Canyon’s train depot.

 

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The Grand Canyon Depot in Grand Canyon Village is the Park’s “front door,” used as a meeting place for adventurers for over 100 years. This National Historic Landmark is the Park’s most-photographed man-made structure.  Pendleton’s contributions will help improve accessibility and preserve the character of this National Historic Landmark.

According to the National Park Service, “Nearly 230,000 visitors per year arrive at the Depot via the Grand Canyon Railway, which is an important component of the park’s transportation system. Currently the Grand Canyon Railway, owned and operated by Xanterra Parks and Resorts, runs up to two trains per day to the park from Williams, Arizona – saving approximately 300 daily vehicle trips during the peak visitor season.” That is approximately 50,000 cars, trucks and campers that will not add wear, tear and crowding to roads leading in and out of the park, thanks to the train.

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Before the railroad opened in 1901, tourists had to fork over $15.00 for a three-day stagecoach ride to see the Grand Canyon. Upon arrival, they were accommodated in tent camps, a situation that didn’t change until the Santa Fe Railroad hired architect Mary Elizabeth Jane Coulter to design six iconic buildings for the park, mostly on the South Rim.

Her work still stands today, having become an integral part of this vast, commanding landscape.

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So put on your boots, hop on the train, and go. The Grand Canyon is waiting.

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Grand Canyon Park Series: SHOP

Grand Canyon #pendle10park explorer: Kristian Irey  Instagram:  @kristianirey

Why We Do This – Running the Grand Canyon with Greg Hatten

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In honor of the Grand Canyon‘s 100th anniversary, we are rerunning some guest posts from our friend Greg Hatten this summer. Enjoy.

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March of 2014 was a deadly month in the Grand Canyon for river runners.   The water level was well below average and even the most experienced boatmen saw water dynamics they had never seen before.  Low water created new hazards – holes were deeper, drops were sharper, jagged rocks that rarely see sunlight punched holes in our boats and holes in our confidence.

An accomplished group of nine kayakers just a few miles ahead of us lost one of their team mates to the river below Lava Falls.  There was a another serious accident in the group two days behind us midway through the trip.

Some of our wood boats were damaged, a few of our rubber rafts flipped, oars and ribs and teeth were broken, a helicopter rescue was required for a member of our team on Day 4. After 280 miles and 24 days on the water, we reached the end of the Grand Canyon and all agreed we were ready to do it again…as soon as possible.

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Who are we and why do we do this???   

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We are a band of wood boat enthusiasts who came to the Grand Canyon in March to re-run a famous trip from 1964 with our wood dory replicas, our canvas tents and bedrolls, our Pendleton wool blankets, and a couple of great photographers to capture the adventure.

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Fifty years ago, that trip played a crucial role in saving the Grand Canyon from two proposed dams that were already under construction.  If THAT trip had not happened, THIS trip would not have been possible and our campsites would be at the bottom of a reservoir instead of beside the river.  River running on the Colorado through the Grand Canyon would’ve been replaced by “Reservoir Running in Pontoons,” as most of the Grand Canyon would’ve been hundreds of feet under water.

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We are celebrating the success of the trip of  ‘64 and paying tribute to those men who left a legacy for future river runners like us to run the big water of the Colorado through the Grand Canyon in river boats.  We are brought together by Dave Mortenson, whose dad was one of those pioneers.

“Who we are” is easier to answer than “Why we do this.” There are moments on trips like these, when we are at the crossroads of chaos – where adventure and wonder intersect with danger and consequence – and the outcome is uncertain. THAT’s what makes it an adventure.  I can only speak for myself – but here’s my shot at answering “why…”

I do this because the Grand Canyon takes my breath away.  The first time I saw it from the bottom looking up, I fell in love with this place and was absolutely amazed by the size and beauty of the canyon.  Everything is bigger, deeper, taller, more colorful, more powerful, more everything than anyplace I have ever been.

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I do this because the Colorado River tests my physical ability as a boatman like no other river I have ever boated.  This is one of the most powerful rivers in North America and when that strong current bends the oars I’m rowing and I feel the raw force shooting up my aching arms and across my tired back, I’m electrified and anxious at the same time.

I do this because the rapids on this river test my mental ability as a boatman.  My friend and veteran Canyoneer Craig Wolfson calls it “Nerve.”  Scouting severe rapids and seeing the safest “line” to run is one thing – having the nerve to put your boat on that line is another.  Most of the difficult rapids require a run that puts your boat inches from disaster at the entry point in order to avoid calamity at the bottom.  Everything in your “experience” tells you to avoid the danger at the top – but you mustn’t.  Overriding those instincts and pulling off a successful run is a mental tug of war that is challenging beyond belief.

I do this because of the bonds we form as a team of 16 individuals working and cooking and rowing and eating and drinking and laughing together for 280 miles.  We problem-solve together, we celebrate together, we look out for each other, and we find a way to get along when every once-in-awhile the stress of the trip makes “some” of us a little “cranky.”   Sometimes, we experience the most vulnerable moments of our lives together.  These people are lifetime friends as a result of this adventure.

 

And finally – I do this because it brings out the best in me.  My senses are better, my mind is clearer, my body is stronger and I like to think I’m friendlier, funnier, more generous, and more helpful down in the Canyon.  It makes me want to be this open with people up on Rim when I get back to my regular routine.  It’s hard to articulate but for me, the place is magic.

Greg Hatten

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See the Grand Canyon Pendleton blanket and throw here: PARK BLANKETS

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Pendleton Towels, ready for Summer Fun

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Customer photo used with permission; all rights reserved

Summer is here, and it’s time to put your Pendleton towels to work. We are making that a little easier for you with a sale that runs through Monday, July 15th, 2019. All our beach/spa towels are on sale for only 39.99 – check it out at your local Pendleton store, or at our website: www.pendleton-usa.com

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Photo by Max Mueller; all rights reserved

The reviews on these towels tell the story:

“These towels are dense, luxurious and beautifully designed. I bought two at the Grand Canyon gift shop and since then have a growing collection of these cool designs. I love Pendleton so much that I recently gave their hoodie towel as a baby gift.” – Austin T X

“I buy one a year and have also received 2 as gifts. Love these towels. They’re like art pieces hanging in my bathroom and they double as a blanket for outdoor concerts.” – Pacific NW

“It’s almost embarrassing how much I absolutely love these towels. I wanted something beautifully made, luxuriously big and super absorbent to have ready for sunny days by the pool. The hanging loop is a nice extra touch–though I keep them rolled in a big wire basket by the door because they are gorgeous enough to keep out on display.” – Scottsdale AZ

“I bought one of these towels for my husband for Christmas and we loved it so much we bought three more for ourselves and two as gifts. They are so absorbent and yet thin enough to dry out quickly, even in a city as humid as Houston.” – Houston TX

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Photo by Joe Goger; all rights reserved

But wait, there’s more! These towels are more than beautiful. With cotton production and manufacture under scrutiny today, we are extremely proud of our OEKO-TEX® Made in Green certification.

What exactly does this mean? These towels are made following environmentally-friendly standards and under safe, socially responsible working conditions as certified by OEKO-TEX®. OEKO-TEX® Made in Green is an independent textile label that ensures products are made without harmful substances, using environmentally friendly processes under safe and socially responsible working conditions.

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Customer photo used with permission; all rights reserved

See the full selection here: Pendleton Spa/Beach Towels 

And wherever you take your Pendleton towels–pool, spa, lakeside, beach or backyard–have a fantastic summer!

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Photo by Rebecca Amber for Pendleton Canada; all rights reserved

Heroic Blankets for Independence Day

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Happy Fourth of July!Today is the day to celebrate America and her heroes, especially those who proudly served to defend our country. Here are some of our patriotic made-in-the-USA blankets. Click the names to see more information.

Brave Star

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This contemporary interpretation of the American flag is a celebration of the patriotism of Native Americans. In 1875 Indian scouts carried messages from fort to fort in the West. Native American soldiers saw action with Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders in Cuba. And soldiers from many tribes battled in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf and Iraq. Five Native Americans have been awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery “above and beyond the call of duty.” The design marries modern asymmetry and vintage Americana. The unique striations, using pulled out yarns, reflect an era when dyes were made from plants.

 

Wildland Heroes

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The scent of smoke fills the air. An orange glow lights the horizon. Mother Nature is on alert, and Wildland Firefighters stand ready to defend her. These brave men and women hold the line against fire’s destruction with team effort; digging lines, running hoses, saving structures when they can. In Pendleton’s tribute to Wildland Firefighting, bands of deep forest alternate with lines of flame, lighting trees endangered by flame. A portion of this blanket’s sales help the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, which supports families and injured firefighters in times of need.

 

Grateful Nation

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The Grateful Nation blanket  honors the sacrifice of brave men and women who have defended freedom throughout the history of the United States of America. Each authentically colored stripe represents a service ribbon awarded to veterans of historical conflicts in which our country has engaged:

  • World War II Asiatic Pacific Campaign
  • World War II Europe-Africa-Middle East Campaign
  • Korean Service
  • US Vietnam Service
  • Southwest Asia Service (Gulf War)
  • War on Terrorism

A portion of every blanket’s sale goes to support the Fisher House Foundation and its mission to support the families of veterans. As their website states:

Fisher House Foundation is best known for the network of comfort homes built on the grounds of major military and VA medical centers nationwide and in Europe.   Fisher Houses are beautiful homes, donated to the military and Department of Veterans Affairs.  These homes enable family members to be close to a loved one at the most stressful time – during the hospitalization for a combat injury, illness or disease… Since 1990, the foundation has saved military, veterans and their families an estimated $200 million in out of pocket costs for lodging and transportation.

 

The Few, The Proud

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The official emblem of the United States Marine Corps, woven in a wool blanket to honor the valor and loyalty of the Marines. The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. Each element signifies the Marine Corps mission and legacy. The anchor reflects the naval tradition of the Marines as part of the Department of the Navy. The globe represents readiness to serve in any part of the world. The bald eagle, symbol of America, holds a ribbon in its beak that reads “Semper Fidelis,” or “Always Faithful,” a reference to the unending valor and loyalty of the Corps. Dyed, woven and hand-finished in America for quality that’s second to none.

 

Bighorn

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Straddling the borders between Wyoming and Montana, Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area is home to spectacular canyons, clear blue waterways and countless wildlife. This woven-in-USA pattern was inspired by the colors, history and vast landscape of this special region. In 1825, the Bighorn River called famed mountain man Jim Bridger to build a raft of driftwood and ride it through the foaming rapids. Part of the river was dammed to create Bighorn Lake, but the spectacular canyon it carved remains, named for the Bighorn sheep that travel its rocky, treacherous paths. Located in Montana and Wyoming, about one third of the park unit is located on the Crow Indian Reservation. One quarter of the Pryor Mountains Wild Horse Range lies within the Bighorn Canyon Recreation Area.

 

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New Child-size/Crib-size Pendleton blankets for 2019

Enjoy a look at Pendleton’s newest child-sized blankets! These soft wool blankets are made in the USA, and are perfect for crib or cuddle. They also make wonderful wall hanging (click the name of each blanket to see more information at pwndleton-usa.com ).

Shared Paths

This beautiful blanket celebrates the path walked in life, from the helpless dependence of a newborn to the self-sufficiency that comes with growing up.

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Shared Paths legend:

The Navajo word for animals, Naaldlooshii, translates as “the-ones-who-trot-people.” The Navajo study an animal’s behavior to understand and learn from it, knowing that appearances say less than actions. Buffalo is mighty and fearsome, but lives gently by grazing on plants. Fox is supple and small, but lives fiercely by hunting. From Deer to Dove, all Earth’s animals move together on Earth’s shared paths in hózhó, the Navajo state of balance and order.

 

Butterfly

This blanket originated as a robe-sized blanket in the American Indian College Fund collection. In the larger version, the pecan-brown side is the face of the blanket. For the child-sized version, we used the more colorful ombred side as the face of the blanket. Sales of both versions support the work of The College Fund, which provides scholarships to tribal colleges for deserving Native American scholars.

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Butterfly legend:

Lakota leader Sitting Bull worked tirelessly for Native American rights. Sitting Bull College on Standing Rock Reservation memorializes his efforts, and demonstrates the American Indian College Fund’s belief that education can transform the future. Sitting Bull’s legacy is honored with flower and butterfly designs similar to those on his regalia. A caterpillar’s transition to butterfly mirrors the transformative impact of education, a fitting remembrance of a man who lived life bravely for his people.

See the full-sized version of this blanket here: Butterfly

 

Morning Cradleboard by Wendy Ponca: Weavers Series

This blanket was designed by Wendy Ponca, a gifted designer and artist who has designed several blankets for Pendleton over the years. It is part of the Weavers Series, which celebrates the artistry of contemporary weavers by incorporating their one-of-a-kind designs into Pendleton blanket designs.

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Morning Cradleboard legend:

This child-sized blanket uses a pattern inspired by finger-woven straps used to secure a baby in a traditional Osage cradleboard. Ponca often creates designs that are tactical by intent, offering Nature’s protection. In Osage, the cradleboard is called o-olo-psha, or “follow-trail-of-animals.” The cradleboard was the beginning of the Road of Life as followed by animals to water and food. People take this same path, beginning life as completely dependent, and working step-by-step to self-sufficiency. As the cradleboard protects the baby, this blanket surrounds a child with warmth and safety on the path to growing up.

Big Medicine

Like the Butterfly blanket above, this blanket began its Pendleton history as a robe-sized blanket. The original Big Medicine blanket was a limited-edition custom run, and each blanket contained hair from a rare white buffalo named…Big Medicine. We wove more of the original coloration using only wool, in both the green version and this new re-color with a charcoal ground.

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Big Medicine legend:

The rare white bison occurs only once in every 10 million births. In 1933, a white buffalo was born in the wild on Flathead tribal lands. He was named “Big Medicine” to reflect his sacred power. Many Native American tribes consider the return of the white buffalo as the fulfillment of an ancient prophecy. Tradition spoke of the coming of a herd of white buffalo. The seven bison on this blanket represent the seven directions: North, South, East, West, Above, Below, and Within. Together, they symbolize wholeness for mankind and the earth. Prayer pipes signify mankind’s communication with the Creator. In the center of the blanket, four hands join within the Circle of Life, representing the joining together of the diverse people of the world and a new beginning. 

See the full-sized versions of this blanket here: Big Medicine

See all our child-sized blankets here: For Crib and Child Pendleton Blankets

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Shwood x Pendleton Instagram giveaway for 2019 – starts tomorrow!

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Our latest collaboration with Shwood is here, and we are celebrating with an Instagram giveaway that starts on Friday, June 28th at 9am PST! Rules are after the video.

The collaboration includes six frame styles and two patterns.

First, Chief Joseph in grey/turquoise. The pattern wraps the inner portions of the acetate sections. The exterior is a very cool grey.

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Next, a wire-rim aviator. The stripe accents are fantastic!

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There are awesome small elements on each of these frames; Shwood has done an incredible job on the details.

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(see all styles on faces below)

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The Shwood x Pendleton sunglasses are available at our website, so check them out and get ready for summer in style. See them here: Shwood and Pendleton for Summer 2019

Enter the giveaway at our Instagram: @pendletonwm

And go behind-the-scenes in this video.

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The Board Shirt by Pendleton, for an Endless Summer

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As we head into the lazy days of summer, it’s time to celebrate the Pendleton Board Shirt.

In the early 1960s, a group called The Pendletones adopted their name in honor of the surf uniform of the day. When surfing came to California in the late 1950s, surfers devised performance wear: swim trunks and plaid Pendleton shirts over a layer of Vaseline. Surfers wore the same shirts over light pants on the shore, and a fashion trend was born.

Even though only one member of the group had ever been up on a surfboard, the Pendletones sang about the simple summer pleasures of the SoCal surf scene; waves, sunshine, cars and girls. Under the unique artistic leadership of Brian Wilson, layered instrumentation and soaring harmonies made these songs anything but simple.

The Pendletones changed their name to the Beach Boys in 1962. And though their name changed, their uniform didn’t. The band wore this blue and charcoal plaid shirt on the covers of 45s and LPs throughout the early 1960s. The Board Shirt remains our bestselling men’s wool shirt to this day. It’s a simple style with a straight hem, signature flap pockets and that easy sport collar with the telltale thread loop, just in case you’re buttoning all the way up. We know, it’s your favorite.

It’s a wonderful time to shop the board shirt. See them here: BOARD SHIRTS

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Pendleton by Sunbrella Fabrics

The season for outdoor living is here, and Pendleton is ready with Pendleton by Sunbrella outdoor fabrics.

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Pendleton consistently searches out the best partners for collaborations and shared projects. We have been delighted with our partnership with Glenraven on a line of Pendleton-patterned outdoor fabrics. These Pendleton by Sunbrella fabrics are perfect for all outdoor uses, including awnings, furniture, umbrellas, and anything else you can think of.  They also work indoors, for ultra-durable upholstery.

Like Pendleton, Glenraven (the company that produces Sunbrella fabrics) is a multi-generational family business. Also like Pendleton, Glenraven is headquartered in the USA. And, again, like Pendleton, they have maintained a strong commitment to weaving in the USA. You can see the Glenraven mill in action in this video.

Pendleton by Sunbrella fabrics use dyed threads for weaving, which means vivid, lasting color. That’s a similiarity to wool, which also takes dye all the way to the core.

One key reason Pendleton has been so proud to work with Glenraven lies in the company’s commitment to sustainability. Any used Sunbrella fabric can be returned to the company for recycling and re-use through their Renaissance program. You can read all about that here: Sustainability and Sunbrella

Did you know you can set a Sunbrella fabric in a bucket of bleach, and it won’t change its color? These fabrics will not run, stain, or fade…ever. The world’s clumsiest person can’t ruin Sunbrella fabrics, though you can watch someone try in this video:

The “Indoor Durability Challenge” will give you an idea of what Sunbrella fabrics can withstand.

We use these fabrics in our store designs, and choose them when our stores need awnings, as in our Pendleton store in Eugene, Oregon. They make an impact indoors or out, as you can see in this adorable camping trailer interior by @stagecoachdetaildesign that artfully uses Pendleton by Sunbrella fabrics. 

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For information on their work and design services, contact information is here: STAGECOACH detail and design

You can purchase pillows at our website: Pendleton by Sunbrella

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We also stock Pendleton by Sunbrella fabrics at our Woolen Mill Store – call the store directly for availability and information. Info here: www.woolenmill.store

Happy summer!

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Graduation time!

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To all the graduates, congratulations. It’s a time to proudly honor your accomplishments, hard work, and success.

Dreams

© Kym Erickson

Published: September 21, 2018

You’re the driver of your destiny,
Passenger of none,
In control and looking forward
Of things that must be done.

You’re the captain of your ship,
Destination unknown,
Plans to help you get there
And freedom to bring you home.

You’re the pilot of your airplane;
Fly as high as you can.
Life is what you make it,
So follow your plan.

Hopes and dreams not yet reached,
Motivation on display.
A journey full of ups and downs,
Experience gained each day.

Direction is always forward;
Backwards remains the same.
Discover your authentic self,
And have a willingness to change.

Enhance each quality given.
Develop talents you were blessed.
Transform your heart into one of gold,
And believe in more than yourself.

Mistakes are made; we move on.
We get back on our feet.
I’m here to support you always
Should you ever need me.

For every start there is a finish.
For every beginning there is an end.
Hold onto your accomplishments,
And even tighter to your friends.

More By Kym Erickson

Source: https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/dreams-12

 

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We sincerely thank you for making us part of your traditions. It is an honor. 

Best regards, 

Pendleton Woolen Mills

photos courtesy: Indian Country Today, ASU news, Student Door, Kelsey Leonard, University of Colorado at Boulder, Glenn Asakawa, Pinterest,  Colorado State University Native American Cultural Center, 

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