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Posts tagged ‘wool blanket’

10 Cutest Pictures of Pendleton Pets

Fun fact: Pets love wool. If you have a wool blanket, your cat has probably “claimed” it as her own (and immediately covered it in fur). Cats and dogs are drawn to wool because it’s breathable and regulates heat, which keeps them cool in summer and warm in winter. An added plus for pet-lovers is that wool also naturally resists germs and dirt. Plus, it’s just plain cozy!

We’ve rounded up 10 of the absolute cutest photos of cats and dogs enjoying Pendleton gear, from wool blankets and throws to our new pet beds, leashes, collars and more. So take a few minutes for a cuteness break, and tell us which one is your favorite in the comments!

There’s nothing better than a puppy, except maybe a puppy asleep on a Pendleton throw. Lucy, an apricot goldendoodle in Washington, dozes off on a pure virgin wool motor robe. Sweet dreams of bagel crumbs and chin scratches, Lucy.

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Photo: @lucy_da_gooldendoodle

 A sleeping cat and kiddo? It’s almost too much to handle. They’re curled up on a Glacier Park knit throw in fuzzy cotton and merino wool. Ahh.

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Photo: @burtsbrisplease

We had to give some love to fellow Oregonian Thomas Guy, who took this photo of his significant other and their aptly named doodle, Laura Darling. The dog looks so soft and fluffy in our Glacier Park dog coat!

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Photo: @thomasguy

 Lauren Gordon was originally was fostering these two kitties, Peanut and Penelope, but she fell in love with them and adopted them. Here they are on an aqua Chief Joseph blanket. (We wouldn’t have been able to resist, either.)

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Photo: @laurenlucybean

Rooster, a Great Pyrenees, protectively cuddles newborn baby Poe as they nap on a Pendleton dog bed in Washington, D.C.

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Photo: @tallulahalexandra

 Why are sleeping animals so cute? Barcelona photographer Raquel Fialho captured the adorable Flor (Portuguese for “flower”) snoozing on our Chief Joseph pillows in aqua and turquoise.

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Photo: @raquelfialho

 Petee the Siberian husky, shown here with one of his humans, is an Ontario pup who loves outdoor adventures—and also Pendleton’s striped leash and travel bowl!

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Photo: @peteethehusky

Oreo the Biewer Yorkie peeks out from a Glacier stripe blanket. Clearly the tiny Bay Area pup has excellent taste.

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Photo: @oreo.bb

 You can’t help but smile at Cooper, a Pembroke Welsh Corgi in San Francisco who likes romping around in the snow while his national park dog coat keeps him toasty.

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Photo: @littlecooperbear

Streeeetch! Peanut relaxes on a Yakima camp blanket on a lazy sunny day. Excellent idea, Peanut.

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Photo: @babyconstellation

 OK, which furry friend is the cutest in your book?

And for more aww-worthy photos of pets and Pendleton, follow us on Instagram here or check out customer photos on our site.

Mill Tribute Blankets by Pendleton: The Buell Manufacturing Company of St. Joseph, Missouri

In 2010, Pendleton Woolen Mills introduced our Tribute Series, paying homage to the American mills that thrived during the Golden Age of Native American Trade blankets. 

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In the early part of the 20th century, Pendleton Woolen Mills was one of five major mills weaving Trade blankets. The Buell Manufacturing Company of St. Joseph, Missouri, incorporated in 1877. St. Joseph was the gateway to a booming Wild West, thanks to homesteading and the Gold Rush. The Buell mill, operated by Norman Buell, his son George, and another partner named John Lemon, was well-run and successful.

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According to the county records of 1904, the Buell Manufacturing employed 175 workers and used more than a million pounds of wool a year. Buell products were sold in every state of the Union (45, to be exact).  Buell products included far more than their Trade blankets. Their colorful designs were only a fraction of the products woven by Buell from 1877 to 1912. Since the Pendleton mill opened in 1909, we were only competitors for three seasons.

buellcoverAccording to our friend Barry Friedman in his book Chasing Rainbows, “The blankets produced by Buell Manufacturing are without question the truest copies of Navajo and Pueblo Indian designs.” The original Buell blanket designs were given tribal names in keeping with America’s romantic view of the west during those years. We’ve included the original names strictly for your information. Please keep in mind that the Buell designs often bore little-to-no resemblance to the weavings of that particular tribe.  Our re-weavings of these blankets are simply named for the original manufacturer, with the number of the blanket in the series.

Buell #6available here ) was originally called the “Choctaw” or the “Spider and Hawk” design.

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Buell #5 available here was called the “Winnebago.” Though Buell has a darker palette than many of the other mills producing blankets back in the day, this blanket is an eye-popper.

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Buell #4 (retired) was called the “Ojibwa.” Dale Chihuly has one of the originals in his incredible collection of Trade blankets. The banded design of diamonds, stripes, stars and that central sawtooth band is just gorgeous.

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Buell #3 (retired) features a rare pictorial element–bands of Thunderbirds. Buell blankets were generally without any type of representational figures. This banded pattern was known as the “Comanche.”

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Buell #2  (retired) is called the “Zuni” pattern in the Buell catalog, but is actually a copy of a Hopi manta according to Barry Friedman (who knows pretty much everything there is to know about Trade blankets).

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Buell #1 (retired) is named “Aztec” in the original Buell catalog. It was offered in at least four different color combinations. An example in this coloration is also part of the fabled Chihuly collection of Native American Trade blankets. This blanket was a bestseller in our first year of the Tribute series.

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Buell blankets are among the most rare and most sought after by collectors today. This mill actually accomplished a major commercial weaving innovation–the incorporation of a third color in a weaving line. This was beyond the capabilities of Pendleton Woolen Mills at the time, so we tip our hat to the Buell Manufacturing Company of St. Joseph, Missouri.

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Something Very Special for the Holidays: Batik Throws for Pendleton by Tricia Langman

This holiday season, Pendleton is proud to offer work by Tricia Langman, co-founder and design director of Spoogi, an international print design studio based on Portland, Oregon.

Tricia, a British textile designer with West African heritage, grew up in London surrounded by print and pattern. She’s a worldwide teacher of design and technique. She  has designed and produced a unique collection for Pendleton Woolen Mills using traditional Batik techniques from Java, Indonesia.

Trish-BatikTricia hand-draws her original design on a specially produced Pendleton blanket, and hand-paints the design with wax.

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She hand-dyes each blanket in her Portland, Oregon studio.

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Pendleton is proud to offer these works of art.

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Available here.

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Pendleton’s Tamiami Trail Blanket and Seminole Patchwork

Tamiami_Trail_FrntPendleton’s Tamiami Trail blanket has been making some noise this year, showing up on the pages of Lucky:

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InStyle:

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And DOMINO:

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The most exciting appearance was on Blake Lively, wearing a Lindsey Thornburg cloak that you can find on preserve.us.

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That’s quite a bit of press for one blanket. People are responding to the intricate, colorful pattern, but there is a story behind the Tamiami Trail blanket. And it isn’t just a good story. It’s an amazing story about resourcefulness and creativity thriving in diaspora.

Tamiami Trail’s design is based on Seminole patchwork designs used in quilts and clothing. By the end of the Seminole Wars in 1858, the Seminole population of Florida was reduced from thousands to a few hundred. By the late 1800s, most had been driven out of Florida, but small bands remained in the Everglades and Big Cypress Swamp. Seminoles quietly retained their culture — farming, hunting alligators and visiting trading posts along the Miami River with pelts and egret plumes to trade for supplies. Their thatch-roofed homes were called chickees, and they traveled in dugout canoes made from cypress logs.

It was a long canoe trip from the Everglades to trade for cotton cloth. Seminole women began sewing with whatever materials and scraps they could find, including survey pennants, fabric selvedges and end-bolts. The patterns themselves tell stories. Click here to read about  the symbology of these patterns. “Strip clothing” became the traditional dress for Seminole men and women.

Below is a Seminole strip dress from the permanent collection of the Met.

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The sewing machine became available to Seminole seamstresses around the end of the 19th century. “A sewing machine in every chickee” was the rallying cry. Seminole quilting evolved using ever-smaller and more intricate piecing.

In 1928 the Tamiami Trail, the highway from Tampa to Miami, opened. The Seminole saw new trade opportunities in the tourist market for crafts such as patchwork and palmetto dolls.

So yes, This is a beautiful blanket. But its design tells a larger story about a beautiful Seminole artistic tradition. Their entrepreneurial success along the Tamiami Trail is a testimony to Seminole resilience. Strip clothing is still made and worn today, and it’s every bit as beautiful.

Additional information here:

http://www.colliermuseums.com/history/seminole_patchwork

http://www.semtribe.com/

http://funandsun.com/1tocf/seminole/semart2.html

Blake Lively and Pendleton

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Blake Lively in August’s VOGUE. The blanket is our Midnight Navy Stripe in Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool.  You can see Ms. Lively’s new American lifestyle blog, Preserve, here.