Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘pendletonwoolenmills’

Where the Mountains Meet the Sea: UGG and Pendleton Collaborate in 2015


Wool, meet wool. If there were ever a natural partnership, it’s this one. Our 2014 collaboration with UGG Australia was an immediate hit and a nearly immediate sell-through, so we’re excited to bring you another collaboration for this holiday season.

We talked about the shared heritage of UGG and Pendleton in a post last year, which you can read here: 2014 UGGs & PWM. Both companies have roots in Southern California’s surf culture, a point nicely illustrated by this display at the UGG Australia HQ..


Our new pattern, exclusive to this collection, reflects this shared history. Inspired by the place where the mountains meet the sea, this banded design has mountain peaks and rolling waves in natural hues. Here it is on the loom at our USA mill.


There’s something for everyone; scuffs, mocs, lace-ups, slip-ons, and the classic UGG in short and tall. There’s an exciting lace-up Adirondack waterproof boot that’s going wild on Pinterest for us. There’s even a baby bootie. JUST LOOK AT IT!!


(Sorry, but that’s one cute little bootie.)

We’re rounding out the offering with vests for both men and women, and assortment of well-crafted bags.


Most of the footwear and bags and both the vests are available at, including this beautifully constructed women’s vest.


Exclusive to are two pieces for the home; a fleece-backed throw and an oversized pillow. We have to show them to you, even though we aren’t carrying them; they are simply beautiful.


We’re garnering some nice recognition in the press, with more to come. You can read about us in GQ and Town & Country. Last year’s collection went fast, so don’t wait to make your choice. You don’t want this one to run away from you!


Rose City ‘Til I Die: Oregon Team, Oregon Blanket, Oregon Pride!

Pendleton Woolen Mills is proud to honor the Portland Timbers with a limited-edition blanket. The edition of 1,975 reflects the Timbers’ beginnings in 1975 as part of the North American Soccer League. Now part of Major League Soccer, the Timbers are cheered on by the Timbers Army, a European-style rooting section that sets the standard for team support in the MLS.

timbers blanket by pendleton

The blanket’s designer, Laura Jost, used her bird’s eye view from the Timbers Army section as inspiration for a stylized representation of the beautiful game. The goalkeepers hang back as two teams converge on the heart of the Rose City, while flags wave, drums pound, colored smoke is released for each goal, and Timber Joey brandishes his chainsaw. Above it all, chant leaders lead the Timbers Army in their battle cry: Rose City ‘Til I Die.


This hometown blanket will be available for preorder through our Pendleton Home Store and on our site starting today, October 8th. The actual blankets will arrive in plenty of time to be wrapped for gift-giving.


This is your blanket for your team, with a design chosen by Timbers fans. A portion of sales will support Fields for All, a nonprofit alliance between the Timbers, Pendleton Woolen Mills and many more, devoted to creating safe, healthy playing surfaces for underserved communities. You can read about the unveiling of a field here: Fields for All Unveiling in Gresham, Oregon.

We asked Laura Jost, the blanket’s designer, to tell us a little about herself, and to describe her inspiration for this beautiful blanket.

Laura, can you tell us a little about yourself?

I was born in Portland and lived all over rural Oregon. My birthday is 9/18, usually very close to Pendleton Round-Up, so my cake usually had a frosting cowgirl or the like. I still love riding horses and the kids love that I am excellent at catching frogs. I moved back to Portland in 1995.

What drew you to the idea of designing a Pendleton blanket?

Pendleton is a brand that is very near to my heart. I drive past the mill and/or stop in every time I visit my parents. My mother instilled my love of Pendleton wools. I received my first blanket in grade school and I still have it: the Glacier National Park blanket. There is Pendleton wool in most rooms of my home; the kids each have a blanket, the throws and pillows in my living room, the blanket on our bed, our beach towels. They are works of art to me.

What’s your design background?

I don’t have a formal design background, but I was raised learning to sew, knit, and garden and I was always artistic: drawing, writing, painting, singing, dancing. I am technically a stay-at-home mom, though I don’t do much staying at home. I volunteer in various capacities at school, and I’m a freelance writer, regularly published in NW Kids Magazine. I love to work with fabric, customizing and sewing clothing for my family. I’m what most people call a jack-of-all-trades.

And now we come to the Portland Timbers. Tell us what the Timbers mean to you.

I have always been drawn to rooting for the “good guys” and that’s exactly what the Timbers feel like for me. The stadium experience just reinforces my love for the game. My husband teases me because I cheer for the players like I’m their mother. I love the camaraderie in the Army. I love the cheering to the very end, cheering even for the misses/good tries. I love the emotional high-fives and hugs when we score. I love watching the Timbers’ kids with their fathers out on the field at the end of the game. I love the celebration in it all. I love waking up the next morning a little hoarse. I just love it!

 When I saw the contest, I was at home sick for several days and did the preliminary layout and drawing to keep my mind busy while I was recovering. I wanted it to look like a Timbers match: the wild flags in the air, the sound of the drums, the colored goal smoke, the field, the players, the Army, the heart of the city and the love I have for Portland: even the little rosettes came to represent the chant leaders and Joey.

 When I looked at it, I saw a wild night of cheering on the home team at the top of your lungs, but it could never compare to innate beauty of a Pendleton, so my entry became just another paper on the counter. I almost didn’t send it in, but my son saw the drawing on the table just before the deadline and gasped, “Mommy, it’s so beautiful!” So, I had to send it in.

 I never thought in a million years I’d hear back from anyone! The fan voting was excruciating. I spent the last day hiding out with the kids as much as possible and when I saw the final numbers, I just couldn’t believe it. It’s still a little hard for me to believe. When I think about seeing a blanket in person, my stomach jumps!


Ours too, Laura, ours too.

Remember, order soon. We expect the edition to sell out quickly, so please don’t wait. Order here: Timbers Blanket


Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People

Tilikum_Crossing_Jan_2015_wiki_free use

September saw the opening of Portland’s Tilikum Crossing, the newest of Portland’s bridges. This one is special for a few reaasons. First, it’s a pedestrian/transit bridge that is only open to pedestrians, the MAX light rail line, buses, bicycles and emergency vehicles. Second, it is named in honor of the people who inhabited this area long before the Jacksons, Hawthornes and Morrisons. Tilikum is a Chinook jargon word that means “people, tribe or family.” It was chosen to honor the Multnomah, Cascade, Clackamas, and other Chinookan peoples who have been here as long as 14,000 years ago.

The name was chosen through an initial round of popular vote, with the final name being chosen by a Trimet committee. The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde were part of the bridge’s dedication, and donated artwork by Chinook artist Greg A. Robinson. The three pieces are collectively titled, “We Have Always Lived Here.”

Two basalt pillars stand at the east and west ends of the bridge. The bronze medallion, five feet in diameter, hangs at the eastern side of the bridge, facing north.  According to the tribe. “The basalt carvings depict Tayi, or headmen, with their people, and the medallion shows Morning Star and her children in the center, which is a reference to the heavens, and Coyote and the first humans on the outer ring, referencing the Earth.”

As part of the opening ceremony for the bridge, The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde commissioned a limited edition blanket from Pendleton Woolen Mills, incorporating the stunning artwork by Mr. Robinson.


Each blanket bore this special patch.


As we understand it, most of the commemorative blankets were given as gifts, and a small amount were sold on Tilikum Crossing’s opening day. We are so honored to have been asked to participate in this event.  Below, enjoy some shots from the bridge’s dedication, including those of the artist being wrapped in another Grand Ronde blanket, and some beautiful closeups of his work. Photos courtesy of Trimet.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Take a Pendleton Mill Tour: From Our Hands to Yours

Nearly every day, we hear from people who have toured our mills in Washougal, Washington, and Pendleton, Oregon. They are impressed by the complexity of the process and the unrelenting noise of a working woolen mill. We are (of course) proud to show off our state-of-the-art mills. That’s why we’re always throwing open our doors to the public. We are working constantly to meet the demand for our fabrics and our weaving capabilities.

You can find information on our tours here and here. Our mill in Pendleton gets quite a bit of press attention, but you can read a detailed history of the Washougal Mill here. But if the Pacific Northwest is not your neighborhood, we offer this virtual tour, filmed at both our mills. We wanted to offer a detailed look at just what it takes to weave a blanket from fleece to finish.


Join the fun with our National Parks Party: July 15th – 19th


Please join us for a great time to celebrate a great cause. See our Parks merchandise and learn how you can help us with the restoration of key landmarks in our National parks! Won’t you join us? Find a Pendleton retail store or Pendleton Outlet by clicking: HERE.


Buffalo and the National Parks: Pendleton’s New Buffalo Wilderness Blanket

BuffaloBlanketIn 2016, we will honor the centennial of our National Park Service. We will celebrate our National Parks, along with the employees and volunteers who work to hold the Parks in trust for generations to come. An important part of that trust includes preserving and managing each Park’s wildlife. The National Parks have played a key role in the preservation of the American bison, commonly known as the buffalo.

In the 16th century, North America was home to 25 to 30 million bison, making the American Plains Bison the most abundant single species of large mammal on Earth. The Plains Bison is a “keystone species.”  The trampling and grazing of these thundering herds actually shaped the ecology of America’s Great Plains. A bison can weigh over 2,500 pounds,  jump six feet vertically, and run 40 miles per hour when alarmed. This is an impressive animal.

The bison played a crucial part in the lives of Nomadic Native American peoples. One bison could provide 200 to 400 pounds of meat, as well as hides, robes, and sinew for bows. Hunting was accomplished on foot and on horseback through herded stampedes over buffalo jumps. For an accurate and detailed account of Native American hunting methods, along with art and photography, see this blog post at Hunters thanked the animals with rituals and prayers for the gift of their lives. The Natives, the herds and the habitat thrived.

Two hundred years later, the bison was hunted nearly to extinction.  Decimating factors included loss of habitat due to farming and ranching, and industrial-scale hunting by non-Natives.  The systematic destruction of the herds was promoted by the U.S. Army in order to strike an irrevocable blow to the way of life of the Plains Nations. The loss of the buffalo was an economic, cultural, and religious tragedy for the original inhabitants of North America. It was also a great loss to the natural ecology of the Great Plains.

Somehow, tiny “relict” herds survived. A few ranchers attempted restoration of the herds through private ventures in the late 1800s. Samuel Walking Coyote (Pen d’Oreille) started a small herd with seven orphaned calves he found west of the Rocky Mountain Divide. Another herd was formed from this initial group, and in the early 1900s, small herds were sent from this second herd to Canada’s Elk Island National Park, and the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma.

Left to graze in protected wilderness and park areas, the buffalo began to rebound. The Yellowstone Park Bison Herd formed naturally from a 23 bison that remained in the park after the massive slaughter at the end of the 19th century. This is the only continuously surviving herd in the Americas, and the largest at over 4,000 head. There are preservation efforts in many wilderness areas and National Parks, in part due to the beneficial effects of bison on regional ecology. Unlike domestic cattle, bison herds cultivate rather than deplete the native grasses through grazing.

Because of the close relationship between our national wilderness areas and the American bison, Pendleton commemorates this impressive land mammal as part of the Pendleton National Parks Collection. Our newest buffalo blanket, “Buffalo Wilderness” celebrates the resilience of a magnificent animal and its role in shaping the Great Plains.


The Buffalo Wilderness design recalls a time when millions of buffalo roamed grassy plains from Oregon to the Great Lakes, from Canada to Mexico. Today our National Parks protect the wilderness, and the buffalo herds can roam free. One of the largest herds (more than 4,000) of free-ranging wild buffalo lives in and around Yellowstone National Park. It is thought to be the only place in the United States where bison have lived continuously since prehistoric times. You can also see herds in Badlands, Grand Teton, Theodore Roosevelt and Wind Cave National Parks.

You can get more information on the blanket here. And remember, the purchase of items from our National Park Collection helps support the National Park Foundation. More information here.



Happy Father’s Day. Sometimes, a picture says it all.


This is a photo of Robert and Matt Raven, father and son, taken in 1963, and shared with Pendleton this last year. It was taken by Carl “Pete” Petersen, who was there along with his son Grant.

Here are some words about his father from Matt, who is a professor at Michigan State University.

My Dad (Robert D. Raven) was the epitome of what Tom Brokaw termed the Greatest Generation. He grew up on a farm in Michigan and was a gunner/mechanic on a B-24 in the South Pacific during WW II. This was one reason he was such a great wing shot. He went to Michigan State (then Michigan State College) on the GI Bill. My mom (Leslie Erickson Raven) was a Marine during WWII (an aircraft mechanic) and also went to Michigan State on the GI Bill. They moved to California after they graduated in 1949 with $200 in their pockets. My Mom help put my Dad through Law School at UC Berkeley (Boalt Hall) and he graduated in 1952. He practiced law for Morrison Foerster (home office in San Francisco) all of his professional career and help build them into one of the premier law firms anywhere. He was one of those men that helped the United States become the greatest nation on the planet after WWII. He died in 2004 and I miss him every day. I am proud to be his son.

What a great American story. We love this image so much, we chose it for our Instagram #PendletonDad photo contest this year. It just says Father’s Day, and it’s a fitting way to wish Happy Father’s Day to all the admirable dads out there from Pendleton Woolen Mills.

Happy Father’s Day to “the officer in the Pendleton.”

We received a letter from Sharon Myers Knoph with some wonderful photos of her father, Fred Myers. We decided to save this post for Father’s Day, because it’s about a Pendleton dad.

Here are Sharon’s words about her father.

My dad, Fred Myers, was born in Parkdale, Oregon.  He joined the United States Marine Corps and served in Korea.  He married Margaret Hinrich of Hood River, Oregon, in 1956.  They eventually settled in southern California where he graduated from the Police Academy. He was an undercover narcotics officer during the 1970s. After retiring from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, my parents traveled the country in their motor home.

mom and dad 2013

My dad loved his Pendleton shirts. He bought his first one in 1957, a shirt that he actually wore for 57 years.  He was described more than once as “the officer in the Pendleton”.  He held his first grandchild wearing a Pendleton shirt.


When he passed away in May of 2014, my mother couldn’t bear to give away his Pendleton shirts. She decided to use them to make three quilts. They are very special to us, reminding us of the man that his friends and family loved very much. In the photo below, his first shirt from 1957 is circled.


Here at Pendleton, we have seen quite a few quilts made from our shirts. But we have not seen one made with the pockets, which is a charming touch. What a way to have your dad keeping you warm forever.


To all the admirable fathers out there, happy Father’s Day from Pendleton Woolen Mills.

Pendleton Pilsner by Rogue Ales


Pendleton, OR. May 11, 2015 – Rogue Ales and Pendleton Woolen Mills announce a collision of Oregon artisans with the unveiling of Rogue Pendleton Pilsner. Brewed at Rogue’s headquarters on the Oregon Coast in Newport, Pendleton Pilsner uses floor malted barley grown on Rogue’s Farm in Tygh Valley and Liberty hops grown at Rogue Farms in Independence, OR. Pendleton Pilsner features a serigraphed bottle design which reflects Pendleton’s iconic jacquard textiles.

“It has been an honor and a privilege to work alongside Mort Bishop and his team at Pendleton,” said Rogue President, Brett Joyce. “In the process of creating Pendleton Pilsner, we discovered that we have a lot of common DNA – we are both generational Oregon companies that come from small towns, we both focus on innovation and product excellence, and we share a passion for creating long lasting, enduring brands and products that we love to share with fellow Oregonians and true fans everywhere.”

“Pendleton is really excited to be working with Rogue,” said Mort Bishop, Pendleton President. “With our craft at Pendleton, weaving fabric in Oregon for 152 years and Rogue’ s deep roots in craft beer in Oregon using the finest ingredients from our region, this feels like a very natural relationship. The creativity around storytelling is also something we share and is a fun way to create wonderful new products. We enjoy working with the talented and committed team at Rogue.”

Pendleton Pilsner will make its worldwide debut during Pendleton Bike Week in Pendleton, OR, from July 22-26 and will also be available in Pendleton stores, Rogue pubs, and at select local retailers in Oregon. For more information on Pendleton Pilsner, please visit and


About Rogue Ale & Spirits
Rogue Ales & Spirits is an agri-fermenter founded in Oregon in 1988, as one of America’s first microbreweries. Since 2008, Rogue has remained committed to saving the terroir of Oregon hops, barley, rye, wheat, honey, jalapeños and pumpkins one acre at a time by  growing its own.

Pendleton on The Voice with Pharrell and Sawyer Fredericks

It was exciting to see our blankets on NBC’s The Voice, as stage dressing during a finale performance by Pharrell Williams and his protege Sawyer Fredericks.


Yes, there among the beanbag chairs and the super-chill tambourine girls swaying gently to the “Summer Breeze,” you can see our blankets; Heroic Chief, Mountain Majesty, and Compass Stripe.




Sawyer is an Americana musician. Our American-made blankets bring just the right American vibe for him. From what we understand, the blankets were given as gifts to the crew after filming wrapped.


You can watch the performance here:

And the big moment here:

Because, guess what? SAWYER WON! But that’s not even the most exciting part.

When our UK partners tweeted a link to this Instagram:

The man himself retweeted it!


Yes, a good day around Pendleton Woolen Mills. You can follow us on Twitter @pendletonwm. And as always, you can get your blankets at



Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 145 other followers