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Posts tagged ‘pendleton blanket’

Five myths about wool, debunked

Ever decided not to buy a wool item because it was itchy or dry clean only? Good news: Thanks to fabric innovations, wool is better than ever, and some old myths about wool aren’t true anymore. Read on to learn the truth about wool.

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Myth #1: Wool is scratchy.

Admittedly, some wool is softer than others. Rough, scratchy wool exists, but so does silky, fluffy wool that feels wonderful next to your skin. It all depends on quality, the type of sheep, and how the wool is spun. Some of the nicest, softest wool is superfine merino.

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Merino wool (from merino sheep) is famous for being smooth and luxurious. The fibers are very fine—thinner than human hair! It is wonderful woven or in knitted accessories, like the mittens above.

But quality matters: The best merino is virgin wool (not recycled) from healthy, happy sheep (yes, that makes a difference!). Finally, wool is softer when it’s worsted. That means the fibers are long, smooth and parallel, rather than fibers of different sizes in different directions.

For Pendleton’s softest wool, try our 5th Avenue throws. They’re woven of superfine virgin merino and incredible to snuggle up with!

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And men should try our Sir Pendleton wool shirts, made of worsted merino for a refined feel. A mile of yarn goes into each one! These aren’t the itchy wool shirts of the past.

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Myth #2: Putting wool in the washing machine ruins it.

This is true of some wool, but not all. Many people have accidentally shrunk wool sweaters in the washer, not knowing that heat and agitation cause felting. The spin cycle mats the wool fibers together, bonding them. This video explains:

Thankfully, some wool can go in your washing machine! Our Eco-Wise Wool blankets and throws undergo an anti-felting treatment, so not only are they washable, but they get softer with every wash. This treatment prevents the fibers from locking together and felting. Now you don’t have to run to the dry cleaner whenever your wool blanket needs refreshing!

Myth #3: 100% pure wool is better than wool blends.

In some cases, it’s true—a sweater that’s 100% merino wool will be nicer than one that’s mostly acrylic or polyester with only 5% wool.

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Wool sweaters are cozy and comfortable and a lot less likely to pill or fuzz. And a high wool content makes for a wonderfully warm blanket that naturally keeps the heat in on cold nights. But sometimes 100% wool isn’t ideal. Wool socks are more comfortable with a little stretch, so nylon or spandex is often added.

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Pendleton baby blankets are mostly pure virgin wool with a bit of cotton to keep them soft and fluffy (they’re also napped for a cozy feel).

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Myth #4: Wool is heavy and bulky.

This depends on the breed of sheep. For example, wool from Icelandic sheep is rugged and coarse, often used to make carpet. In contrast, wool from the Rambouillet breed—a relative of merino sheep—is very fine, perfect for soft, silky clothing. Fabric innovations have made wool lighter, like Pendleton’s Wool-Lin fabric. It’s pure virgin wool that feels like linen but doesn’t wrinkle nearly as easily. (Perfect for spring suiting.)

Myth #5: Pendleton only makes wool blankets.

grace_adams_10_2015_home_f15-7While Pendleton is perhaps best known for our first product, wool blankets, we began to branch out into apparel in 1927 with our first men’s shirts. Our line has grown to include wool sweaters, shirts, blazers, skirts, accessories and much more. We also use other natural fibers, such as silk and cotton, for comfortable, quality clothing year-round.

So there you have it! Any other questions about wool? Ask us in the comments below!

Thanks to the wonderful Grace Adams for her Brand Ambassador photography.

See more of her work here: Grace Adams Photography   

And follow her on Instagram here: @grace_adams

 

 

Another adorable tiny home with Pendleton

We found some Pendleton touches in another tiny house, this one on Apartment Therapy.

We were intrigued by this particular structure because it’s a conversion. Most tiny homes are built to be tiny (like Tam and Sean’s, featured earlier this month), but this one is a converted outbuilding–a garage, to be exact. With its loft and 250 square feet of living space, it has much of the aesthetic of a home that was built small, but it’s charmingly square. The plank walls and rustic rafters give this home a real cabin feel, and the exposed lathe-and-plaster over the bed is another charming touch.

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(source-Apartment Therapy)

img_8984Name: Coralie Hews
Location: Northeast Portland, Oregon
Size: 250 square feet, including loft
Years Lived In: 7 months; Rented

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img_8785-3Though she was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, Coralie Hews has always possessed a Southwestern sensibility, especially when it comes to matters of interior design. Her beloved New Mexican textiles, cacti, and earth tones have always had a prominent place in her design palette, so it’s no surprise that all of those tasteful elements come into play in her dreamy, 250-square-foot cabin.

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img_9031Because Coralie downsized from a spacious one-bedroom apartment to a much smaller, lofted, one-room garage-turned-cabin, she was forced to edit all of her furniture and decor down to only her personal must-haves; she loaned a few pieces to friends, got rid of things that she had no use for, and put some bulkier odds and ends into storage. What she was left with is a charming juxtaposition: a bohemian blend of desert-inspired textiles and ceramics with a well-loved collection of Pacific Northwest relics.

img_9038-3Coralie rents the space from Emily Christensen, the Portland-based clothing designer behind Filly and Beeek, who lives in the main house. Three years ago, Christensen turned the garage on the property into a cabin which was originally listed on Airbnb, but eventually became home to year-round renters. Coralie was lucky enough to hear about the space through a good friend who was a previous tenant and was able to settle into the cabin in the spring of this year.

Though it does take effort for Coralie to keep such a small space simultaneously functional and aesthetically pleasing (i.e., keeping the place clutter-free), it is a challenge that she gladly tackles each day. The contentment she finds in living in her cozy, tiny cabin is a worthy payoff. Thanks for sharing your lovely space with us, Coralie!

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For virgin wool Pendleton fabrics woven in our own USA mills, see us at our Woolen Mill Store, or shop here: FABRICS

If you love the vintage Harding blanket on Coralie’s sofa, check out some of our beautiful black & white Pendleton blankets here and here. Oh, and here, too!

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Native American Inspiration: The Peaceful Ones and Gift of the Earth

Two of our 2017 blankets are inspired by Hopi culture.

“Hopi” is a shortened form of Hopituh Shi-nu-mu, or, “The Peaceful Ones.” The Hopi reservation covers almost 2.5 million acres of northeastern Arizona, near the Four Corners area east of the Grand Canyon. The Hopi reservation is completely surrounded by the Navajo reservation. Its 14 villages sit on three rocky mesas; First Mesa, Second Mesa, and Third Mesa. The Hopis have lived here for over a thousand years. They follow a yearlong calendar of rituals and ceremonies, and carefully maintain their traditions.

The first blanket is our newest American Indian College Fund blankets, Gift of the Earth, which celebrates Hopi pottery.

Gift of the Earth

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The Hopi have a sacred relationship with the ancient caretaker of the earth, Masaw, and respect every gift given to them. The clay they and their ancestors have sourced from the land for centuries is treated with the utmost regard. Because of this, the Hopi people maintain a beautiful and unique pottery tradition on the mesas in Arizona. Craftsmanship and creativity drawn from generations of knowledge flow through the potters today as they work. This blanket draws on the design elements from these brilliant pieces as a testament to learning from the past while moving into the future.

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(source – photo by Holly Chervnsik)

Interesting facts about Hopi pottery:

  • The golden hues of early Hopi pottery might have sparked the tales of fantastic wealth that lured early Spaniards to the Seven Cities of Cibola.
  • Smooth, symmetrical vessels might appear to be wheel-thrown, but are formed by hand through “coil and scrape.”
  • The most common shapes are shallow bowls and flat-shouldered jars.
  • Paints are made from natural materials, such as tansy mustard and beeweed.
  • Hopi pottery is open-fired with sheep dung and cedar.
  • Today, most pottery is made on First Mesa.

Like all our College Fund blankets, sales of Gift of the Earth help support scholarships to Native American Scholars. Learn more here: The College Fund

Our second Hopi-inspired blanket for 2017 is The Peaceful Ones.

The Peaceful Ones

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They call themselves Hopi, a shortened version of their true name: Hopituh Shi-nu-mu, the Peaceful Ones. Members of this Southwest nation follow the Hopi Way, based on the instructions of Maasaw, the Creator and Caretaker of Earth. The Peaceful Ones strive to be mannered, polite, and peaceable in all interactions. Their path will eventually lead to a state of complete reverence for all things. This design is based on an embroidered Manta, the garment worn by Hopi women in ceremonies that follow the lunar calendar. Through their traditional ceremonies, the Peaceful Ones hope to bring tranquility and harmony to the entire world.

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Interesting facts about the manta:

  • The manta is a rectangular cloth, fastened at the right shoulder and held by a sash.
  • Mantas were originally woven of undyed cotton. Over time, dyed threads and geometric patterns added beauty to the garment’s simple shape.
  • The practice of wearing blouses or shift dresses under mantas came much later, under pressure from missionaries.
  • Once the everyday wear of Navajo, Pueblo and Hopi women, the manta is now worn during important ceremonies.

We are excited to be sharing these blankets soon at  www.pendleton-usa.com.

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Gifts that Give Back: The American Indian College Fund Blankets

2016_fall1_blankets_throws_aicfToday is #GivingTuesday. Each year, as you plan your holiday shopping, please remember gifts that give back. Since 1990, Pendleton Woolen Mills has been proud to support the work of the American Indian College Fund. Sales of these blankets fund scholarships to tribal colleges, and make a difference in the lives of students throughout the country.

We have already featured this year’s blanket, the Naskan, so we’re showing you some others. Go see them all here: The College Fund Blankets

Nike N7

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Innovation meets tradition with this collaboration between Nike N7 and Pendleton Woolen Mills. For inspiration, Nike designer Derek Roberts (the design genius behind our popular Star Wars blankets) looked to traditional Native American dress and how the patterns work together to create a garment.

Return of the Sun

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This graphic design was created in partnership with Native American artist Larry Ahvakana. The changing of the seasons plays a central role in many Iñupiat traditions and activities, and in Mr. Ahvakana’s sculpture work. This blanket celebrates the arrival of the sun back to the Arctic and the start of hunting season.

Raven and the Box of Knowledge

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Internationally renowned glass artist Preston Singletary grew up in the Pacific Northwest. His works explore traditional images and legends of his Tlingit heritage translated into glass. The image on this blanket represents Raven, a shape shifter and trickster who often employed crafty schemes to achieve his goals

Earth Blanket

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Inspired by a blanket in an Edward S. Curtis photograph, the Earth Blanket embodies the elements of earth and sky, with a grey triangular step pattern in the center called the mountain design. Each cross represents the four directions.

Water Blanket

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Also inspired by an early 20th-century photograph by Edward S. Curtis, this blanket is inspired by the peerless weaving of the American Southwest. It incorporates classic Navajo elements in an eye-dazzling pattern. The central dragonfly, an emblem of water, symbolizes life.

We’ve shown you only four of these beautiful blankets. See the other choices, including saddle blankets and two children’s sized blankets, at our website: The College Fund Blankets

Learn more about the work of the College Fund here:   www.collegefund.org

Pendleton Weaves New American Indian College Fund Blanket

shondina_yikasbaa_04_10_ww_home_acc_f16-17Photo courtesy of Shondina Lee Yikasbaa

We are proud of this year’s blanket to benefit the American Indian College Fund.  Naskan Saddle Blanket tells the story of Johano-ai, the Navajo sun god, who begins his day in the east and rides one of his five horses across the sky to his post in the west while dragging his shining, golden orb – the sun. As his horse gallops across the sky, gorgeous hides and ornately woven blankets, known as naskan, lie beneath its hooves.

aicf_naskan_saddleblanketNaskan Saddle Blanket derives its mountain pattern and name from sacred Navajo blankets. It joins a collection of ten blankets designed specifically for the American Indian College Fund, designed by Native artists. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of College Fund blankets provides scholarships for Native students to attend tribal colleges and universities. The College Fund has been the nation’s largest philanthropic effort supporting Native American higher education for more than 25 years.

shondina_yikasbaa_04_10_ww_home_acc_f16-3Photo courtesy of Shondina Lee Yikasbaa

Cheryl Crazy Bull (Sicangu Lakota), American Indian College Fund President and CEO, said “The American Indian College Fund is delighted with the  Naskan saddle blanket, the newest design in our collaboration with Pendleton Woolen Mills. Just as this blanket represents a path taken by a sacred being across the sky, our students also take a journey toward realizing their dreams by walking a sacred path toward success. We honor and celebrate both our students’ journey and our longtime successful partnership with Pendleton Woolen Mills as they work alongside us to make our students’ visions for success a reality.”

shondina_yikasbaa_04_10_ww_home_acc_f16-2Photo courtesy of Shondina Lee Yikasbaa

Today, slightly more than 13% of American Indians age 25 and older have a college degree, less than half the U.S. national average. What’s more, 40% of the American Indian population is under the age of 18.  The College Fund is helping more American Indians of college age to start and complete their college degree through scholarship support.  The College Fund also provides program support for students once they are in school to help them succeed both academically and in their careers.

shondina_yikasbaa_04_10_ww_home_acc_f16-1Photo courtesy of Shondina Lee Yikasbaa

“Pendleton is proud to be a part of the American Indian College Fund’s mission, and its purpose to transform Indian higher education,” said Mort Bishop, Pendleton President.  “By creating an awareness of the unique, community-based accredited Tribal Colleges and Universities and offering students access to knowledge, skills and cultural values, the College Fund enhances their communities and the country as a whole.”

 

About the American Indian College Fund – Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for more than 25 years.  The College Fund has provided more than 100,000 scholarships since its inception and an average of 6,000 scholarships per year to American Indian students and a variety of programs to support their academic efforts ensuring they have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers.  The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators.  For more information, please visit www.collegefund.org.

 

Our gorgeous model is photographer Shondina Lee Yikasbaa of New Mexico. See more of her work on Instagram: @shondinalee

See the blanket here: NASKAN SADDLE BLANKET

A Special Blanket Supports Native Women’s Health

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and we thought that would be a terrific time to tell you about a special version of our Chief Joseph blanket.

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A purchase of this beautiful cherry-pink blanket benefits the women’s health program of NARA, the Native American Rehabilitation Association of the Northwest, INC.  NARA is a Native American-owned, Native American-operated, nonprofit agency.

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NARA is an Urban Indian Health Program that provides integrated healthcare in the Portland Metropolitan area.  They offer a broad array of services including medical, dental, mental health, addiction treatment, and culturally based services.  Culture is a critical and integral part of everything they do.

We had a conversation with Yolanda Moisa, most current director of the newest clinic run by NARA and the BCCP Director (Breast and Cervical Cancer Program), to learn about NARA’s women’s health program.

PWM: Can you tell me about your organization’s mission?

YM: Our mission at NARA is to provide education, physical and mental health services and substance abuse treatment that is culturally appropriate to American Indians, Alaska Natives and anyone in need. Our purpose is to achieve the highest level of physical, mental and spiritual well being for American Indians and Alaska Native people.

Our women’s health program is a critical part of our larger physical health outreach.  It’s the women who make this program so rewarding.  Throughout the 20 years of this program, we have helped women from all backgrounds. Each person is unique and has a story to tell. We save lives daily.  Our hope and goal is prevention and no cases of cancer ever, however, the reality is that catching cancer sooner than later makes for a much better prognosis.

PWM: Can you tell us about some of your more rewarding moments?

YM: There are so many stories of success and how we help women, we are helping generations of women.  A story that comes to mind is that we had a woman who had just moved to the Portland area and came in for another visit and our staff noticed she was due for her yearly women’s exams.  When she received her results from her mammogram a small lump in her breast was detected. She did find out that it was cancerous, it was caught at Stage 1.  We walked her through her options and our team was there to answer all her questions.  Just having someone listen to her and help manage the many appointments that come with cancer treatment was a comfort.  More importantly, she brought her daughter in and sisters in to be tested, again changing lives.

PWM: When did NARA form and how many people have you served?

NARA has been in the community since 1970, and offering medical care since 1993. Since 1996 we have helped Women receive 5,160 MAMS and 6,391 PAPS.  We have two clinics, one at North Morris Street and our new Wellness Center on East Burnside. The women’s health program is housed in our clinic at 12360 E Burnside, Portland, OR 97233. The program offers women’s services at both clinics where screenings, and references for mammograms to low income, uninsured Native women. We want to provide early detection for breast and cervical cancer. As an urban facility, we’ve been able to serve members from over 250 tribes, nations, bands, who are all able to access any of the services here.

PWM: That’s fantastic. What drew you to this program, Yolanda?

YM: I came to NARA after many years in the corporate legal field. I’m a member of the Tule River Tribe in Porterville CA, and it was always my intention to return to working with Native Americans–to give back. Throughout my career I have volunteered and advocated for women and children.  Coming to NARA was like finding a family that truly “got it”, understanding what it means to help our community.  I see my family in the many faces in our waiting rooms: my grandmother, aunties, uncles, mother and siblings. I came in as a grants manager and was here for almost two years. I became clinic director  two years ago, and was pleased when we received a HRSA grant that helped set up the pharmacy and pediatric program at the site. I’ve been here close to five years and have continued to appreciate all that NARA does. It’s pretty amazing!

PWM: Are there special challenges within the Native American community?

YM: For Native women, there is a history of trauma around medical services. Along with assault, abuse and harassment, there is a documented history of forced sterilization. This painful history plays into fear and mistrust of medicine.

Our CDC (Center for Disease and Control)  grant  allows us to do something special for Native American and Alaska Native women—weekend clinic sessions that we call the Well Women’s Event. These events are designed as a safe place for women.  It’s not uncommon to have generations of women from families come together. The grandmother, mother and daughter will all come for the daughter’s first mammogram for support.  We open the clinic to women only. Our guests are welcomed to a Native crafts night, and a women-only talking circle. The nurse on staff gives one-on-one advice and education.  We offer cervical cancer screens here, and transport woman safely to and from an off-site mammogram facility.

Any woman who gets a screening receives culturally specific books about women’s health, including  “Journey Woman: A Native Woman’s Guide to Wellness”. Through the generosity of Pendleton we were allowed to use  Pendleton art forms in the books.

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When women see themselves in health materials, it builds trust and adds warmth to what can be a very cold environment. Some women come just for the community events, and that’s fine. Our goal is to make women’s healthcare safe and communal, almost a celebration of womanhood.

PWM: How does the Pendleton blanket help?

YM: Each purchase of the blanket generates a donation to NARA. The money will go into the women’s health program, helping us expand our outreach to various underserved and marginalized communities within Portland.  We hope to start momentum that leads to continuing healthcare. If we can save one life, we’re proud.  Hopefully with these added donations we will continue to help many more women.  Thank you Pendleton!

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If you would like to help NARA through direct donation, feel free to contact Yolanda Moisa at [email protected] or 503-224-1044.

If you would like to help through the purchase of the special edition Chief Joseph blanket, see it HERE: Chief Joseph.

A new blanket for Jackson Sundown, Pendleton Round-Up Champion

Note: In honor of the new blanket honoring Jackson Sundown, we’re sharing an older post about one of the great riders of the American West. It explains our company’s long and rich connection with the Pendleton Round-Up, and tells the story of Jackson Sundown, a real-life hero and icon of the west.

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Sundown was the first Native American to win the World Saddle Bronc Championship and crowned the All-Around Cowboy at the Pendleton Round Up in 1916…at the age of 53! He was the nephew of Chief Joseph and his life spanned from the Indian Wars to frontier settlement. Pendleton has created a Jackson Sundown blanket that is only available at two locations:

Tamastslikt Cultural Institute
47106 Wildhorse Blvd.
Pendleton, Oregon 97801
541.966.974

Pendleton Mill Store
1307 SE Court
Pendleton, Oregon 97801
541.276.6911

Let’er Buck!

The Pendleton Round-up  is going on this week—an amazing rodeo adventure in Pendleton, Oregon. Our designers travel there for inspiration, entertainment, and to watch our westernwear in action on rodeo competitors and fans. Oregon Public Broadcasting has a video titled “Pendleton Round-Up: The Wild West Way”  that’s well worth watching, and Cowboys & Indians magazine has some great background.

Among the historic images, you’ll see this shot:

This is Roy Bishop and Jackson Sundown posing at the Pendleton Round-Up. This image actually made the fashion blogs in 2009, when recreations of Roy Bishop’s fringed coat and Jackson Sundown’s oval-print shirt were part of Pendleton’s Centennial offering. But the story is about more than fashion history. This photo is about rodeo history.

The association of Pendleton Woolen Mills and the Round-Up goes back to the very beginning, when along with his brothers Clarence and Chauncey, Roy Bishop established the first mill at its current location in Pendleton, Oregon. The brothers combined their production and retailing expertise with an idled mill, a river, and fine fleece provided by local wool growers. Back then, PWM was a blanket company. Our first and most valued customer was the Native American, and the Bishop brothers worked hard to fill the strong demand (we still sell approximately 60% of our blankets to Native customers every year).

The Bishops were key to the conception of the first Round-Up. Rodeos are big business now, and they were big business then. It was an undertaking to get to a rodeo, especially for a working cowboy. The Round-Up needed something special to draw the crowd. It was unheard-of to include Native Americans to a Western rodeo, but Roy Bishop rode out to meet tribal leaders and invite their participation. He was politely received and quietly listened to, but he left without receiving a definite answer.

The rodeo’s starting date approached, and still he waited. On the morning before the rodeo began, Roy stepped out on the mill’s loading dock. In the distance, he had his answer when he saw the dust of the tribes as they made their way to the Indian campground. The cooperation between the Columbia Basin tribes and the Pendleton Round-up, unique among modern rodeos, continues to this day.

So what about the other person in this photo?

Jackson Sundown was born Waaya-Tonah-Toesits-Kahn in 1863 in Montana. During the Nez Perce war of 1877, he rode with Sitting Bull, retreating to Canada with the Sioux. He eventually returned to Washington, then to Idaho, then to Montana, supporting himself by working, breeding and breaking horses.

In 1912, at the age of 49, Waaya-Tonah-Toesits-Kahn began entering rodeo events in Canada and Idaho using the name Jackson Sundown. The crowds went wild when he tied his braids under his chin, lifted his sombrero and started the ride, his wooly angora chaps streaming.

He took so many prizes that other riders refused to challenge him. Stock owners pulled their animals when they saw his name on the list of possible riders, as after Jackson Sundown rode a horse, it might be so thoroughly mastered that it never bucked again.

Jackson Sundown entered the Pendleton Round-Up several times, placing but not winning. In 1915, in a controversial decision, he placed third and decided to retire from rodeo riding. But a sculptor named Alexander Phimister Proctor prevailed upon him to try one more time. In 1916, he did. Jackson Sundown came out of the gate on a horse named Angel, and the spectacular ride that followed has become legendary. The crowd went wild, and threatened to take down the grandstands board-by-board if Sundown wasn’t awarded the title he had so clearly won.

At twice the age of his competitors, the lanky six-foot tall Indian not only won the bucking championship, but the all-around title as well. He lived out his life on the Nez Perce reservation, raising horses and passing on his skills until his death in 1923. He’s been inducted into more rodeo and athletic halls-of-fame than we have space to list. He is a key character in a novel by Ken Kesey, The Last Go ‘Round.

Jackson Sundown is also featured in a terrific documentary called “American Cowboys.” This is a detailed look at the frustration of competitive riding for contestants of color. It was playing at the Tamastslikt Cultural Center just outside Pendleton, which is a fantastic place to learn about the history of the tribes of the Columbia Basin. It may or may not be part of their permanent installation, but this documentary includes footage of Sundown riding. Sadly, photographs of him riding rare; this may be the only one.

It is sad that a man who possessed such incredible skills in horsemanship isn’t shown during more of his competitive rides. But there are plenty of images of Jackson Sundown showing his deep understanding of a wardrobe’s role in a great performance. Chaps, hat, and that aloof expression. Jackson Sundown had it all, a fact well-illustrated by this logo for the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. Yes, that is Jackson Sundown.

So today, in honor of the Pendleton Round-Up, please enjoy these images of Jackson Sundown; Nez Perce warrior, compatriot of Sitting Bull, bronc rider, horse breeder, main character, documentary subject, fashion blog icon, Round-Up Champion and Inductee into the Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum.

And a true proponent of individual style.

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Rocky Mountain National Park: Taking a Blanket Home with a #pendle10parks Explorer

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The Rocky Mountain range stretches for over 3,000 miles, from New Mexico to the northernmost reaches of British Columbia.

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Rocky Mountain National Park is one of many national parks in the range; in Canada, Banff, Jasper, Kootenay and Yoho; on the US side, Yellowstone, Grand Teton, Glacier and more.

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Rocky Mountain National park was dedicated on September 4, 1915, and became America’s tenth national park. At 14,259, it was also America’s highest. That has changed in 101 years. Currently, it’s one of the five highest parks in the lower 48, because Denali beats everything, obviously.

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Rocky Mountain is still one of the America’s largest parks, at 416 square miles and 265,769 acres of wilderness. It hosts over three million visitors per year. Motorists enjoy the highest paved road in America.

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Hikers, campers and climbers are drawn by its 35 trailheads, 260 miles of horse trails, and the gorgeous waterfalls that tumble through the park’s almost 500 miles of streams and creeks, including the headwaters of the Colorado River.

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Those are some impressive numbers. But the park’s visual splendor is even more impressive.

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Since a quarter of the park’s land is above the treeline, it offers a rare chance to experience the alpine wilderness. Wildlife is abundant and varied, with 280 species of birds and 60 types of mammals, including moose, elk, black bears, mountain goats, mule deer, the ever-present coyote and the famed bighorn sheep. These massive (non-wool producing) sheep have become symbols of the park. That’s why they are featured on the Pendleton blanket label, shown here on the coffee cup.

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And here’s the blanket:

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Rocky Mountain National Park

Blanket: Colorado’s Rocky Mountain ecosystem rises from lush grassland and forests to sub-alpine, alpine and barren alpine tundra in blue, green, gold and grey stripes.

Label: Bighorn sheep bask in the sunny lowlands, reintroduced after near-extinction.

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Our #pendle10explorer Kate Rolston did a breathtaking job of taking our Rocky Mountain National Park blanket home to its park.

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You can see more of Kate’s work here: @kate_rolston

And remember, your purchase of our National Park Collection helps support preservation and restoration of America’s Treasures.

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Pendleton’s 10 best fall new arrivals to buy now

 

Happy fall! It’s Pendleton season: time for steaming mugs of tea, autumn leaves and curling up on the couch with a warm wool blanket. Wool may be breathable enough for spring and summer, especially in silky, light merino, but fall and winter are when we really shine. So chop the firewood, put on the kettle and check out 10 of our best new ways to stay cozy and stylish!

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  1. Neskowin Wrap Coat

This wool jacket is so striking! Our geometric Harding pattern, almost a century old, is modern in black and ivory (plus it’ll match almost anything). This one will get you admiring glances and compliments wherever you go.

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  1. 5th Avenue Throw in Auroral Plaid

New colors of our most luscious wool throw just arrived, including “auroral plaid,” a pattern named for the vivid greens and teals of the Northern Lights. I know I talked up this throw last time, but it’s seriously one of Pendleton’s best products—so soft and velvety, you just have to feel it to understand.

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  1. Sunset Cross Knee High Socks

Soft and warm merino wool? Check. Eye-catching pattern? Check. Perfect knee-high length to peek out of your favorite fall boots? Also check. These socks are the newest addition to our bestselling socks, so scoop ’em up while you can!

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  1. Journey Jacquard Shearling Collar Coat

This coat has gotten a lot of buzz already, and I can’t resist touching the soft shearling collar whenever I walk past it at work. It can just as easily be a hipster coat or an outdoorsy dad coat, don’t you think? The wool’s the same premium wool/cotton blend we use in our famous blankets (and woven in the Pacific Northwest). Definitely a winner!

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  1. Sunset Cross Mesquite Cape

The rainbow of fall colors woven into this cape is gorgeous but not loud, anchored by flattering tawny hues. Looking at it gets me excited for pumpkin spice lattes (yes, I’m basic) and crunching crispy leaves underfoot. This is one of those pieces you’ll have forever because it’s unique, high quality and just that beautiful.

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  1. Cedar Mountain Utility Tote

This ain’t no screenprinted cotton canvas tote you got free and use for veggies at the farmer’s market. This one is pure virgin wool in Southwestern colors and pretty diamonds with leather straps for added panache. There’s a sleeve for your laptop in there, too.

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  1. Hooded Blanket Shawl

Tis the season to wrap up in softly brushed wool! Shawls are the new hoodies, in my book: just as easy to throw on, yet leagues more stylish. In quintessential autumn colors, this shawl will have people asking, “Do I know you from Instagram? Aren’t you that famous style blogger?”

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  1. Boro Shirt

Guys can never have enough blue shirts (hey, they look great with jeans). But in a subtle patchwork pattern, this one is different enough to keep things interesting. Plus it’s pure virgin wool, so it won’t wrinkle and it’s naturally breathable. Also comes in a fitted version.

  1. National Park Motor Robe With Carrier

It’s still the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, and we’re celebrating with four new throws inspired by the Great Smoky Mountains, Badlands, the Grand Canyon and Acadia National Park. These each come with a leather carrier so you can bring yours along to a football game or keep it in the car in case you need it. (Watch out, though—dogs are quick to claim these!)

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  1. Reversible Chaparral Cape

Simply stunning. I can picture Blake Lively wearing this dramatic cape while breezing through Manhattan in some cute black ankle boots and leggings. Or, more importantly, you! A warm, fashion-forward alternative to a jacket that will have you turning heads all autumn.

 

What’s your favorite, and what will you be wearing this fall?

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Don’t forget; through December 9, 2016, we’re offering Free Shipping to try out your fall favorites. Details at www.pendleton-usa.com.

 

PENDLETON® RELEASES “BB-8” AND “Star Wars: Rogue One” LIMITED EDITION BLANKETS

Pendleton Woolen Mills is proud to announce two new Pendleton blankets as a tribute to “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” and “Star Wars: Rogue One.”

This is the droid you’re looking for. This limited edition Pendleton blanket depicts the lovable droid BB-8, an indisputable fan favorite and major scene-stealer who debuted in The Force Awakens. Ombré shading represents the blue and red lightsabers of Rey and Kylo Ren, the film’s hero and villain, while geometric shapes add a distinctly Pendleton touch.
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Dark silhouettes hint at the mysterious heroes at the heart of Star Wars: Rogue One, the latest chapter of the Star Wars saga. This limited edition Pendleton blanket gives you a sneak peek at new characters Jyn Erso and Captain Cassian Andor, as well as the droid K-2SO, the tropical planet of Scarif–and is that Darth Vader and the Death Star in the distance? Bands of green reflect the film’s muted palette.RogueOne_StarWars_MotorRobe_F

The edition size is limited to 1977 hand-numbered units for each of the full-size blankets. Each is presented in a commemorative box. The BB-8 box stacks with the previous four editions released in 2015.

 

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Each blanket also comes in a Padawan child-sized edition. We’re still waiting on our “Star Wars: Rogue One” sample, but here’s the BB-8 blanket. As you can see, it’s a slightly warmer/brighter palette, with a bright yellow whipstitched binding. And he’s a friendly droid for a child’s room!

 

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Every blanket is made in America, woven in Pendleton’s own Pacific Northwest Mill.

The blankets are scheduled to ship in early October. They are available for preorder on Friday, September 2nd. Preorder online here: SHOP STAR WARS BLANKETS

The blankets are also available for preorder at the Pendleton store locations listed below.

Pendleton retail stores:

Downtown Portland

Pendleton Woolen Mill

Reno

PDX

Seattle

Milwaukee

The Pendleton Home Store

Pendleton Outlet stores:

Centralia

Washougal

Columbia Gorge

Woodburn

Lake Arrowhead

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