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Posts tagged ‘pendleton blanket’

#pendletonpups on Instagram: Connie the Corgie needs his own post.

Connie the Corgi is a blue-eyed charmer with his own Instagram account.

Good morning Instagram! What are you all up to this weekend?

A photo posted by Connie the Corgi (@conniethecorgi) on

 

He has a true love of Pendleton.

Saturday mornings with Connie. He always wakes me up nice and early.

A photo posted by Connie the Corgi (@conniethecorgi) on

 

He is a playful fellow.

Happy Movember! 😛 This is my entry to @ichaity and @pitterpatterfurryfeet's Movember contest #Movember2014Contest.

A photo posted by Connie the Corgi (@conniethecorgi) on

 

And quite well-dressed in his flannel plaid.

On Fridays we wear flannel. #flannelfriday

A photo posted by Connie the Corgi (@conniethecorgi) on

 

When he is worn out, he appears to appreciate relaxing on Pendleton’s Made in the USA wool blankets.

Enough photos, it's time for bed. Goodnight everyone! 💤

A photo posted by Connie the Corgi (@conniethecorgi) on

Home sweet home and quite content to spend the evening snuggling on the couch, catching up on our favorite TV shows. #lazycorgi

A photo posted by Connie the Corgi (@conniethecorgi) on

 

Especially if Dad is around.

Thanksgiving, part two. #after @conniethecorgi #pendleton #YakimaCampBlanket #pendledog #pendletonblankets #madeinUSA

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on

 

We think Connie looks like he’s a lot of fun.

Leaving this li'l guy in the morning on work days is the pits. Thank goodness it's Friday!

A photo posted by Connie the Corgi (@conniethecorgi) on

 

Connie, thanks for your brand support. And go fetch that ball.

"What do you MEAN we can't play fetch in bed?"🎾

A photo posted by Connie the Corgi (@conniethecorgi) on

 

 

Pendleton’s Tamiami Trail Blanket and Seminole Patchwork

Tamiami_Trail_FrntPendleton’s Tamiami Trail blanket has been making some noise this year, showing up on the pages of Lucky:

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InStyle:

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And DOMINO:

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The most exciting appearance was on Blake Lively, wearing a Lindsey Thornburg cloak that you can find on preserve.us.

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That’s quite a bit of press for one blanket. People are responding to the intricate, colorful pattern, but there is a story behind the Tamiami Trail blanket. And it isn’t just a good story. It’s an amazing story about resourcefulness and creativity thriving in diaspora.

Tamiami Trail’s design is based on Seminole patchwork designs used in quilts and clothing. By the end of the Seminole Wars in 1858, the Seminole population of Florida was reduced from thousands to a few hundred. By the late 1800s, most had been driven out of Florida, but small bands remained in the Everglades and Big Cypress Swamp. Seminoles quietly retained their culture — farming, hunting alligators and visiting trading posts along the Miami River with pelts and egret plumes to trade for supplies. Their thatch-roofed homes were called chickees, and they traveled in dugout canoes made from cypress logs.

It was a long canoe trip from the Everglades to trade for cotton cloth. Seminole women began sewing with whatever materials and scraps they could find, including survey pennants, fabric selvedges and end-bolts. The patterns themselves tell stories. Click here to read about  the symbology of these patterns. “Strip clothing” became the traditional dress for Seminole men and women.

Below is a Seminole strip dress from the permanent collection of the Met.

Dress

The sewing machine became available to Seminole seamstresses around the end of the 19th century. “A sewing machine in every chickee” was the rallying cry. Seminole quilting evolved using ever-smaller and more intricate piecing.

In 1928 the Tamiami Trail, the highway from Tampa to Miami, opened. The Seminole saw new trade opportunities in the tourist market for crafts such as patchwork and palmetto dolls.

So yes, This is a beautiful blanket. But its design tells a larger story about a beautiful Seminole artistic tradition. Their entrepreneurial success along the Tamiami Trail is a testimony to Seminole resilience. Strip clothing is still made and worn today, and it’s every bit as beautiful.

Additional information here:

http://www.colliermuseums.com/history/seminole_patchwork

http://www.semtribe.com/

http://funandsun.com/1tocf/seminole/semart2.html

Happy Halloween from Pendleton and Voodoo Doughnuts!

Editor’s note: Today’s blog post is brought to you by guest blogger Mark Poltorak, who manages the Pendleton employee store. Enjoy it!

Everyone who works at Pendleton’s corporate office has smelled it; that delicious odor of deep-fried donut batter as we leave the building and walk toward Burnside.

A line of patient patrons congests the sidewalks for what seems like 24 hours a day.  We see the iconic pink boxes all over town, in the airport and on TV.

Established in 2003, Voodoo Doughnuts has become an iconic, must-see/eat in the “Keep Portland Weird” tourist scene.  Now, Voodoo has asked Pendleton to create a Voodoo Doughnut blanket that will keep you as warm as those fresh out-of-the-fryer sugary treats.

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The blanket features a detailed display of Voodoo icons.  In the center, emerging from the center of the blanket (and a doughnut, of course), we are greeted by none other than Baron Samedi.  Baron Samedi waits at the crossroads between the worlds of the living and the deceased.  He is armed with a shovel and eager to dig the graves and greet the souls of the newly departed.  It is rumored that Baron Samedi can be brought to a swoon with treats (such as doughnuts!).

A comforting sight to balance the grim aura of Baron is the impressive spread of Voodoo’s bread and butter: the doughnuts! Fans of Voodoo will find all their bizarre but delicious favorites: the McMinnville Cream, Neapolitan, Diablos Rex, Sprinkle, Bacon Maple Bar, Portland Cream and Triple Chocolate.

Of course, the blanket wouldn’t be complete without a representation of the most iconic Voodoo doughnut of all! The Voodoo Doll doughnut is featured multiple times.

Long after Baron has claimed us all for his own keeping, this eerie blanket will keep you warm.  Be on the lookout for one at the Voodoo Doughnut site. And remember, “The Magic is in the Hole.”

Pendleton Pets: Dog Day Afternoon

It’s true that cats rule the Internet. It’s also clear that cats rule Instagram, if you compare the ‘likes’ on a cat Instagram to the ‘likes’ on a dog Instagram. But Man’s Best Friend is long-suffering and waits his turn. Today, we bring you a collection of Pendleton Dogs from Instagram. All photos used with permission.

 

Lovely morning sunshine and #Pendleton #coffee #lazysunday photo by @laicie #glacierpark #pendledog #dogsofinstagram #homedecor

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on

A little terrier, a Glacier National Park Blanket, a cup of coffee. Life is officially complete.

 

An Irish wolfhound on location at a photoshoot for ROXY with our Bright River blanket.

 

With a Pendleton wool shirt and a wolf hybrid dog, you’d feel pretty safe in the wilderness.

 

Dogs like glamping, too.

Spaniels holding court on Heritage and Mill Tribute blankets.

 

#LazySunday Pendleton style. Thanks @hawthornegirl #Pendleton #staycation #woof #bostonterrier

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on

This Boston Terrier cuddles up to two garments from The Portland Collection. That’s one stylish dog.

 

#Dog naps with #Pendleton. #pendledog #woof #pendletonblankets regram from @collabfashion

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on

An elegant dog on one of our most popular and elegant designs, the Glacier National Park blanket.

 

Another great Pendleton wool shirt, another great dog ready to take on the day.

 

What to wear today? #Pendleton bandana. #woof #pendledog #wtw #dogsofinstagram #dog regram from @lifewithleroy

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on

A Norfolk terrier looking dashing, dapper, and dandy in a Pendleton bandana.

 

What better way for this big beauty to dry off than a  Pendleton Spa Towel?

 

Woof woof. #pendledog #woof #Pendleton #pendletonblankets #interiors #decorate #PendletonHome @markatthemuseum

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on

Quite a shot with a little Puggle (we think) and the Glacier National Park blanket.

 

Lola Jane samples some Dawg Grog on her custom blanket made from Sugar Skulls fabric.

 

…and now for a moment of #zen. #pendledog #woof #Pendleton #pendletontowels #color #dog #swimming #sleepy @thiswildidea

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on

This looks to be one enlightened pup in his Pendleton Spa Towel.

 

There you have it. You can follow the fun on Instagram @pendletonwm.

Greg Hatten and a Wooden Boat Proposal

Greg Hatten is our guest blogger today. Usually he writes about heart-stopping whitewater river journeys in his wooden boat, the Portola. Today’s post is about another kind of adventure, and it’s more heart-tugging than heart-stopping. We hope you enjoy it.

My youngest daughter and her serious boyfriend, Josh, took an Oregon river ride in my wooden boat one hot summer weekend last year. Despite the lack of fishing time, we all had a great time. This trip was about the water, the waves, and the old man checking out the young man in my daughter’s life. He checked out fine. I liked him much more than the others that had come and gone before him.

One year later, he was eager to come back to Oregon. He was ready to get back in the boat and maybe catch a steelhead on a fly. Understand, this is an accomplishment that requires thousands of casts and years of suffering broken rods, broken leaders, broken spirit. But he had a goal, so we saved the date. As it approached, his interest and questions about the details of the trip increased.

It was going to be a hot, sunny day. We started early. ‘0 dark 30 early, 4:30 AM early. Mentally making our offerings to the steelhead gods, we climbed in my FJ40, pulled the choke, turned on the headlights and headed up river, boat in-tow. We pulled into the boat launch. Judging by the lack of trucks and boats at the ramp, most fishermen had stayed in bed, conceding the day before it even began.

The most elusive of Pacific Northwestern fish proved to be just that. For two hours we fished some of the best pools and slots on the river and felt nothing – not a bite, not a hit, not a take-down, no sign of a steelhead. A familiar fishless ache in my gut prompted me to remind Josh of the degree of difficulty and disappointment associated with chasing steelhead on the fly. And then–WHAM! Josh felt “the tug” — a strong one – and suddenly line was peeling off the reel and the rod was doubled over in a rainbow arc. I heard him say, “WOW.”

It was a great fight with impressive runs and a few sharp jumps caught in vivid HD by the Go-Pro mounted on the bill of a fishing hat. A thirty minute tug-of-war brought a tired fish to the net and into the boat. He did it! On one of the hottest, sunniest days of the summer, Josh had hooked and LANDED his first steelhead on the fly.

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We took the required pictures. He sat there holding the big fish in my boat, looking very serious and clearing his throat. Then he asked my blessing to propose to my daughter. Then it was my turn to feel “the tug,” and Josh heard me say “WOW.” But this had nothing to do with a fish. I thought, are you kidding me? Who’s writing the script for this? He’s holding a trophy fish in my wooden boat and asks for my daughter’s hand in marriage. What could a fly fishing father say but, “Let me shake your slimy hand and welcome you to the family, Son.” Especially since fifteen minutes later, in the very next pool, Josh hooked up and landed a second steelhead in a battle that was even more dramatic than the first. That time, we both said, “WOW”.

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Greg&Josh_fishing

That evening, after a dinner of fresh steelhead on the grill, Josh pulled out a ring and proposed to my daughter Sarah by the light of the campfire over the sound of the McKenzie River flowing behind Eagle Rock Lodge. She said yes. And then I’m pretty sure she said, “WOW.”

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Quite a day.

 

Our congratulations to the happy couple. Be sure to read about Greg’s river adventures here, here and here.

Stana Katic from Castle in Pendleton! VIDEO

Stana Katic, a small-screen favorite on “Castle,” is lighting up the pages of Good Housekeeping this month with our womenswear. Below is a behind-the-scenes video. It looks like this was a fun shoot!

 

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Here she is in our Juneau Vest (this color will be arriving soon).

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Blake Lively and Pendleton

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Blake Lively in August’s VOGUE. The blanket is our Midnight Navy Stripe in Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool.  You can see Ms. Lively’s new American lifestyle blog, Preserve, here.

 

Patriotic Blankets for July 4th

We have woven many blankets that celebrate American patriotism over the years, from the Grateful Nation and Code Talker blankets that celebrate the contributions of our veterans, to retired blankets like Chief Eagle and Home of the Brave.

Here are two beautiful blankets that summon the patriotic spirit of this Independence Day.

Dawn’s Early Light:

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“O say can you see by the dawn’s early light.” These words were penned on the back of an envelope in 1814 by young lawyer and poet Francis Scott Key. Key was held captive on a Royal Navy ship as British ships in Chesapeake Bay bombarded Fort McHenry throughout the night. When dawn broke, the fort was still standing, the American flag still waving. It was a turning point in the war of 1812, and the birth of our national anthem, the “Star Spangled Banner.” This blanket, woven in our American mills, commemorates the Bicentennial of that momentous morning in U.S. history. Fifteen red and white stripes and stars represent those on the flag at that time. Each star is shaped like an aerial view of the fort, which was built in the shape of a five-pointed star. Striations and imprecise images give the design a vintage Americana look.

Brave Star:

Brave_StarThis contemporary interpretation of the American flag is a celebration of the patriotism of Native Americans. In 1875 Indian Scouts carried messages from fort to fort in the West. Native American soldiers saw action with Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders in Cuba. And soldiers from many tribes battled in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf and Iraq. Five Native Americans have been awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery “above and beyond the call of duty.” The design marries modern asymmetry and vintage Americana. The unique striations, using pulled out yarns, reflect an era when dyes were made from plants.

Have a great Fourth!

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Three Corn Maidens

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The Three Corn Maidens blanket is part of our series for the American Indian College Fund. The Three Corn Maidens design tells the story of the Pueblo people’s belief that just as the sun gives life to the corn, the Corn Maidens bring the power of life to the people. The blanket was designed by Isleta Pueblo artist Mary Beth Jiron as a celebration of her acceptance into the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Jiron attributes the concept to visions she had and the desire to tell a story from her own culture in which corn is the staff of life and often the center of ceremony. Three Corn Maidens is the second design in the American Indian College Fund’s series of student-designed blankets. The Three Corn Maidens design won first place in the student blanket contest.

If you’d like to support that AICF through a blanket, you can see all the designs here. Since 1995, Pendleton Woolen Mill’s support of the American Indian College Fund (the Fund) has helped more than 400 students pursue their dreams of obtaining a college degree through the Pendleton Woolen Mills Tribal College Scholarship Program, which provides scholarships to American Indian students attending tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) in Washington and Montana, and the Pendleton Endowment Tribal Scholars Program, which provides scholarships in perpetuity to Native students attending TCUs throughout the United States.

“We are always inspired by the individual stories of struggle and triumph of the students who receive the scholarships,” said Robert Christnacht, Pendleton Home Division Manager. “Pendleton is honored to be able to contribute to the long-term growth of the tribal college system through the American Indian College Fund.”

 

Lou Doillon via Garance Doré

Here’s Lou Doillon perched on her Chief Joseph blanket from fashion photographer, illustrator, and writer Garance Doré. Beautiful!

Lou courtesy Garance Doré

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