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The new Zagat Survey for Portland hit the inbox this week…

…and we are in it!

Portland_Zagats

The Zagat Survey was brainchild of Tim and Nina Zagat, who polled their friends and published the results in 1979 as a way to locate the best dining experiences in New York City. The survey quickly grew beyond their immediate circle of friends, and has come to include over 70 cities, including Portland.

Over a quarter of a million people have contributed their opinions and comments on restaurants, hotels, theaters, golf courses, and shopping. The bound guide is available by subscription, a handy and handsome publication to carry along to your favorite city. The Zagat.com site is free to the public.

So how did we do? Very well, thank you. The ratings are on a thirty-point scale, and the higher, the better. We are happy to say that the downtown Portland Pendleton store scored very highly. So did the flagship Pendleton Home store. And, now that we think of it, so did the Woolen Mill Store.

Yes, we had a trifecta of nice Zagat scores.  We got a kick out of the quotations from survey-answerers, which are set off in quotes. Our staff “goes above and beyond.” Our “incredible quality” is “hard to beat.”

Our favorite quote? “It’s a Pendleton…enough said.”

Six You Don’t Want to Miss

Here’s a list of six special Pendleton blankets that are retiring soon.

1. New Mexico Centennial

New Mexico Centennial

The New Mexico Centennial blanket is designed around the red Zia sun symbol, in which the Circle of Life binds together elements: four winds, four seasons, four directions and four sacred obligations. The blanket has a clean, graphic beauty. This is a limited edition, with very limited availability from Pendleton the Courtyard, located at 1100 San Mateo NE, Albuquerque, NM.  505.232.0088.

2. Keep My Fires Burning

Keep-MyFires

Keep My Fires Burning pays tribute to Native American storytellers, who fill an important cultural role in each tribe by passing on traditions of healing, song, ceremony, dance and most importantly, creation. Storytellers interpret tales taught to them by their elders, and adding their own experiences to create sacred and living narratives that span generations.

3. AICF 20th Anniversary by Maria MartinezMaria Martinez for AICF 20th Anniversary

This blanket, based on the work of the late ceramic artist Maria Martinez , pays tribute to her artistry with Pueblo Indian Pottery. Her black-on-black pottery reached new heights in artistic expression, skill and technique. This blanket honors the 20th Anniversary of the American Indian College Fund, and reminds us that we can only reach new heights together.

4. Sunrise Song HeritageSunrise Song

Sunrise Song uses the brilliant colors of daybreak to represent the Sunrise Ceremony that is common to many Native American tribes. The people gather, wrapped in blankets and facing the East, to greet the Morning Star with dance, prayer and song. Together, they give thanks for another day of life.

5. Sugpiaq Umaq

Sugpiaq Imaq

Sugpiaq Umaq, with a design based on ancestral art created by Kodiak craftsman and artist Jerry Laktonen, celebrates a rebirth of the Alutiiq people culture of Native Alaskans indigenous to Kodiak Island and parts of the mainland. Sugpiaq means “the real people,” and Imaq means “ocean.” The bold rising sun mask represents the Alutiq cultural resurgence and Alaska’s midnight sun. Sea life swims around the sun, while Alutiiq kayaks travel across the top and bottom of blanket.

6. Our Lady of Guadalupe

Our Lady Of Guadalupe

Our Lady of Guadalupe portrays the radiance and beauty of Mexico’s popular religious and cultural image. Since 1531, Our Lady’s icon has resided in the Basilica of Guadalupe, extending her promise of love, compassion and protection to all.

If you need help with tracking down any retired blanket, please call our Pendleton Home Store at 503.535.5444. Our expert associates can often help you when all else has failed!

Customized with Pendleton Plaid!

One of our customers, Jeremy Fisher, brought in his classic Volkswagen Squareback to show us how he’s customized the interior in Sea Mist Plaid fabric purchased from the Woolen Mill Store.

Jeremy Fisher

Jeremy is a golf pro (see his gearshift), and wanted his car to reflect his lifestyle & love of golf.

jeremys car

interior

front seats

Great work, Jeremy! Come see us at the Woolen Mill Store whenever you’re struck with inspiration.

Pendleton & Weddings

Here at Pendleton, we are so moved when people take the time to let us know the special ways they incorporate Pendleton into their lives. And that includes weddings!

Heather Bayles Photography

Quite a few editorial shoots use us for wedding or engagement photos.  But when we’re used as part of an actual wedding, as we were in the wedding of Zoe Fisher and Matt Johnson (photos by Heather Bayles Photography), we are incredibly proud.

Pendleton played a part in the engagement of Bob and Melba Stork. They were shopping in Pasadena, California on a spring day in 1951 when a store window with Pendleton shirts caught their attention. They looked at several patterns and decided on a red and green plaid as an engagement gift to each other.

Bob and Melba wore traditional bridal attire when they were married on October 27th, 1951, at St. Luke’s Catholic Church in Temple City, California.

Storks Wedding, 10/27/1951

After the wedding, they left for a honeymoon trip to the Grand Canyon, where they stayed in a cabin near El Tovar. Bob set up a tripod to capture a picture of them wearing their shirts as a newly married couple.

Fifty years later, their twin daughters and their husbands organized a golden wedding anniversary celebration for the Storks, their family and friends at the Grand Canyon. This photo was taken near the spot where the first photo was taken; a short distance from their honeymoon cabin.

Storks Anniversary, 10/2001

The Storks have worn their shirts as jackets many times over the 61 years of their marriage. They have been part of travels throughout the United States, and Melba says, “(they) are as bright, fashionable and warm as they were when we purchased them 61 years ago.”

Bob and Melba Stork were married 61 years on October 27, 2012. Bob is 93, and Melba is a bit younger. They still travel, but they won’t be taking their Pendleton shirts with them anymore. They are passing them down to their granddaughter, Lauren, and her fiance, Drew, who will be married this coming February. We will count ourselves lucky to get a photo of the “kids” in these shirts.

The next wedding we’re going to show you took place last winter, when Celeste Grewe and Joshua Bond said “I do” at Camp Creek Campground in the Mt Hood National Forest. After the bridal party wended its way through a snow-carpeted forest, the ceremony took place in front of the camp kitchen for the CCC workers in 1936.

Bond wedding photography by Mike at Powers Studios.

Josh and Celeste met while working at a local snowboard shop called Exit Real World (with whom we did a collaboration some years back). The mountain has played an important part in their relationship, so it was fitting that they were married at 2200 ft elevation.

Celeste had this to say; “We wanted our wedding to really reflect Oregon, and especially to give our out-of-town guests a great feel for the history of the state. Both our families raised us with Pendleton products. Pendleton has a longstanding history with Oregon and the Northwest. It was important to incorporate a traditional element into our wedding, which is where we got the blanket ceremony (plus it was really cold last February). It was also a wonderful way to ask our parents to be involved with the ceremony.”

First, the bride and groom were wrapped in Crater Lake National Park blankets by their fathers. This symbolized their separate lives. These blankets were removed and held by their maid of honor and best man. Then the mothers of the bride and groom wrapped them in a white Glacier National Park blanket to symbolize their shared future.

The Crater Lake blankets were presented to the mothers as gifts.  Celeste said of the Glacier blanket, “It’s a show piece in our home.” She is happy with how the national park blankets hearken back to “…the early part of the 1900s, the national parks, and the CCC and WPA, and the 1940s time frame of the ring I inherited from my paternal grandmother.” As you watch the slideshow (photos by Mike at Powers Studios), watch for other Pendleton items on the guests and bridal party.

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To all of our friends who have made Pendleton part of their weddings, we say, best wishes for the future. May your beginnings be sweet, and may your lives together be wonderful. Thanks for letting us be a part of both.

Happy New Year!

Christmas at our Old Town corporate HQ

This week, it’s pretty quiet at our headquarters in Portland’s Old Town.  We thought we’d share a little of our holiday atmosphere.

These some shots were taken in our reception area, and in the three story atrium that is our main building lobby. You can see our heritage in the raw fleece, antique bobbins, and a child-sized Wolf form (a very vintage model from back when we offered boy’s shirts). There are Santas dressed in Pendleton plaid. Portraits of members of the Bishop family, who have steered Pendleton Woolen Mills for six generations, decorate the walls. And you can see the antique salesmen’s trunk we filled with items for local charities.  Six boxes worth!

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Finally, down in our main lobby, you can see the Thomas Kay lager. It has sold through, but looks quite festive in the window.

From all of us to all of you and yours, have a peaceful holiday and happy new year.

Father Winter

As the holiday nears, it’s time for a visit from Father Winter.

2012 Father Winter

 Father Winter is a distinctly American take on Father Christmas.  His robe is cut and sewn of Pendleton wool in the Evening Star jacquard , with natural fur and feather trims.  He carries a staff and bag with woodland accents and has an incredibly soft white beard.  We think that he has a little more rugged mystery than the standard Santa; a sense of dark  forests with snow underfoot and stars overhead.

2012’s Father Winter takes his place beside the 2011 Father Winter.

2011 Father Winter

Each and every Father Winter is handmade for Pendleton by Anita Baptiste, an artist in Chandler, Arizona.  Ms. Baptiste works with the rich colors of our wool to create a harmonious blend of natural elements.  She’s planning a beautiful Father Winter for next year, which we will introduce this summer.

So hang those stockings and light those candles.  And though Father Winter looks like he might prefer pemmican, go ahead and leave him some cookies.  Some traditions never need changing.

Jackson Sundown Exhibits

Bob Chenoweth, a curator, contacted us to see if he might acquire a Jackson Sundown Western shirt for some upcoming exhibits in Idaho. He also mentioned a tipi that had belonged to Mr. Sundown that he was hoping to include, as well.

The shirt in question was a special design we produced in 2009 based on a shirt worn by Mr. Sundown in one of the more iconic shots in Pendleton’s archives: Mr. Chenoweth found his Jackson Sundown shirt, and we also sent him a copy of the photo that inspired it.

Roy Bishop & Jackson Sundown

He replied as follows:

I thought you might like to know that after comparing contemporary photos of the tipi from when we set it up a few years ago to the photo you sent, it is the same tipi. 

Tipi 4


This particular tipi was made in about 1878 for Corbet Lawyer to use when he went to Oklahoma to advocate and help the 1877 war prisoners that were taken there after Chief Joseph surrendered at Bear Paw, Montana.

Read more

Join the Tartan Party at our Pendleton retail stores

Tartan Party

Pendleton loves tartan so much that we’re throwing a party!

More information here, and we hope to see you there!

Nancy Hales

It’s a busy week here at Pendleton Woolen Mills, but there is always time to share another photo of Nancy Hales looking terrific.

Nancy Hales

As the Portland Tribune says:

In her full-time work as director of First Stop Portland, Nancy Hales has been an unofficial ambassador to the city; now she’ll do so in another role as First Lady of Portland. She’s already started to make a fashion statement by supporting local companies. Here she wears Pendleton Woolen Mills’ Portland Collection, which she likes for its durability and classic appeal. ‘I’m trying very hard to wear Portland,’ she says.

Please check the Portland Collection blog for stores near you.

Welcome to the Lobby

This is Shelley, the Visual Director for our stores.  We are lucky to have her creative visual input around the corporate headquarters. While down in the archives, Shelley found some sepia-toned prints of people at work in the Pendleton mills. She brought them up, dusted them off, and let them inspire some beautiful lobby windows with blankets, and Fall 2012 apparel from Womenswear, Menswear and The Portland Collection.

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Hope you enjoyed this tour of Shelley’s creative work. We are thankful to enjoy it every day. From all of us at Pendleton, have a happy Thanksgiving.

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