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The Heritage Collection; centuries of beautiful blankets.

With our Heritage Collection, Pendleton has brought many of our classic patterns back to life in our USA mills. Using designs from our archives as old as 1896, we’ve painstakingly rewoven blankets from the heyday of the Native Trade blanket. These blankets display a dizzying richness of color and geometry.

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Canyon Diablo:

This is the newest addition to the Heritage Collection. Fifty thousand years ago the Canyon Diablo meteorite made its mark on the Arizona landscape. Millennium later, pre-historic Native Americans discovered meteor fragments along the canyon rim. Many Southwest cultures since have considered these fragments to be gifts from the gods endowed with other worldly energy. Today the crater made by the meteorite sits on the Navajo Indian Reservation near Flagstaff. This is an Overall pattern blanket.

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Gatekeeper:

The Gatekeeper is an original Pendleton design from 1935. An eight-point star is the central figure. This common design element among the Sioux (Lakota, Dakota and Nakoda) often represents the morning star, gatekeeper of the day, shows the way to the light and knowledge. This blanket is a beautiful example of a Centerpoint pattern – one that contains a central design element that falls within a band through the center of the blanket.

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Evening Star:

The Evening Star design features a traditional star symbol emblazoned on the colors of the sunset. The outlined Venus symbols–representing both the morning and evening star–that inspired this blanket have been found on rock art throughout North and South America. Stories of the Evening Star (the planet Venus) are found in a number of Native American myths. This is a Nine Element blanket.

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Silver Bark:

The original Silver Bark blanket dates from the 1920s and was rediscovered in a private collection. The design features stylized arrow, star, diamond and waterbug motifs in colors inspired by the white and grey bark of Aspen trees against a blue sky. The original blanket was bound in satin, like a bed blanket. Our re-creation has a wool binding (twin sizes) or a suede trim (full, queen and king sizes). . It’s a stunning example of an Overall pattern.

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Turtle:

This has been a favorite in the Heritage Collection for almost a decade. The Turtle Blanket is a re-coloration of an early 1900s Pendleton design, and is one of the longest offerings in the heritage Collection. It pays tribute to the Iroquois Confederacy, one of the oldest participatory democracies on earth, consisting of the Oneida, Seneca, Mohawk, Cayuga, Onondaga (and later the Tuscarora) Nations. The Turtle design was inspired by Iroquois, primarily Mohawk, creation legend. This blanket is another example of Centerpoint design in which three major design elements fall in a row down the center of the blanket.

The Heritage Collection blankets are beautiful, but they don’t stay in the line forever. All are available at www.pendleton-usa.com.

Rick Steber signs RED WHITE BLACK at the Pendleton Round-Up

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If you’re heading to the Pendleton Round-Up, you will want to meet author Rick Steber. He will be signing copies of his book, Red White Black, at the Pendleton store in Pendleton, Oregon on Saturday, September 12th, 9 AM to 12 PM.

The story of the Pendleton Round-Up is inextricably linked to the story of Jackson Sundown, a rodeo champion from the Nez Perce tribe.  Red White Black tells the story of the 1911 Pendleton Round-Up, when three men of different skin colors – Jackson Sundown, John Spain, and George Fletcher – competed in the finals of the Northwest Saddle Bronc Championship. What happened that September day, the judges’ decision and the reaction of the crowd in the aftermath, forever changed the sport of rodeo.

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Rick Steber, who spent nearly four decades researching this story, has more than 30 titles under his belt and sales of over a million books. Rick is the only Oregon author to have won the prestigious Western Writers of America Spur Award – Best Western Novel. He is a keen observer of the changing American West and he articulates these changes in prose that are boldly descriptive, invigorating and creative. This is your chance to meet him and have him sign a piece of Round-Up history for you.

The Paddle to Quinault Journey

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We received a letter from Kathleen Praxel about the Paddle to Quinault, a water journey that takes place each summer in Canada and the Pacific Northwest.  Participants travel the Salish Sea, a network of waterways connecting  the Strait of Juan de Fuca to Puget Sound.

This year’s Paddle to Quinault Journey embarked from Squaxin Island and landed at Taholah, Quinault tribal headquarters on the mouth of the Quinault River.  From July 15th to August 1st, this year’s journey covered over 300 miles of waterways including Hood Canal, the Straits of Georgia and Juan de Fuca, and the Pacific Ocean from Neah Bay to Taholah.

Over 46,000 spectators watched the paddlers at different points on the journey, with visitors from New Zealand and Australia, as well as many tribes from Canada. Next year the event will start from Taholah and the paddle will be to Bella Bella in Canada – a distance of some 700 miles.

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This is Martha Boyer, Quinault tribal member and skipper of the “Chi? Swit”(pronounced Chee e Swite), a canoe named for Martha’s grandmother. She is posed before a Raven and the Box of Knowledge blanket. Martha’s photo and pictures of the Chi? Swit are in the Lake Quinault Museum, Quinault, Washington.  The museum was opened 10 years ago and includes history, photos and artifacts from the nearby communities of Quinault, Amanda Park, Queets, Clearwater, Neilton, Humptulips, and Taholah.  You can learn more about the museum on its Facebook page.

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This is  group of  “pullers” with Kathleen’s husband, Ed, at their place on the North Shore of Lake Quinault.

The journey is designed to strengthen participants’ ties to their history and homeplace. To learn more about the Journey and the people involved, please enjoy this feature in the North Kitsap Herald, “Canoe Journey helps participants connect with who they are | Paddle to Quinault.” Thanks to Kathleen for telling us about this journey and sharing her wonderful photos. And for those of you who are interested in the blanket, here is the story:

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This intriguing blanket is based on a work by internationally renowned glass artist Preston Singletary. Mr. Singletary grew up in the Pacific Northwest – both of his great-grandparents were full-blooded Tlingit Indians. His works explore traditional images and legends of his Tlingit heritage translated into glass. The image on this blanket represents Raven, a shape shifter and trickster who often employed crafty schemes to achieve his goals. In the story, the old chief who lived at the head of the Nass River kept his precious treasures – the sun, the moon and the stars – in beautifully carved boxes. Raven steals the light, and making his escape carries the sun in his mouth. The sun is a metaphor for enlightenment or knowledge. The ombred background shades meet in the center in vibrant colors of sun and light. Mr. Singletary’s artworks are included in museum collections from the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC to the Handelsbanken in Stockholm, Sweden. He is a member of the Board of Trustees for the Seattle Art Museum. A portion of the proceeds from this blanket will be donated to the American Indian College Fund to help support tribal colleges.

Pendleton opening in Milwaukee WI’s Historic Third Ward

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We’re pleased to announce the opening of our newest store in Milwaukee, Winsconsin’s historic Third Ward.

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We will throw open the doors (or roll them up, this is a firehouse after all) on Labor Day weekend to welcome visitors into a flagship store that celebrates Pendleton’s history with special fixtures, visuals and merchandise. You’re going to love our mix of women’s casual, men’s heritage, blankets and special brands.

Grand opening details are below. We’ll celebrate our opening with a weaving demonstration by fiber artist Susan Buss. Susan is a fiber artist who has been featured on Martha Stewart. She’s been chronicling her prep for the demo, and will bring the process of weaving wool to life for you when you stop by. We have gifts, we have special offers, and we have our special lines, The Portland Collection and Thomas Kay.

Do we sound excited? We are excited. We can’t wait to invite you in. And what better doors to open than those of the Ward’s firehouse?

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The firehouse in which we’re located was restored to its former glory after the Third Ward fire.  The bronze statue out front captures a firefighter and his faithful companion waiting for the next bell. This is just one of the historic buildings in a fascinating American neighborhood that actually began as an urban swamp drained in the early 1900s by the Irish immigrant community.  They built homes, wharves, warehouses, rendering plants,  shipping house and more. The railroad came through in 1856, helping to form a trade route from Lake Michigan to the West.

The Ward was thriving in 1852 when a fire started in the Water Street Union Oil & Paint Company.  Fanned by 50 mph winds, the neighborhood ignited. Help came from as far away as Chicago and Oshkosh, but 440 buildings burned and 1900 people (mostly Irish families) were left homeless. This drastic fire accounts for the cohesive look of the Third Ward. Milwaukee’s leading architects came together to redesign the commercial buildings. Many stonemasons and bricklayers were needed during the 35 years of reconstruction. Italian immigrants skilled in these trades settled the neighborhood and by 1915, the neighborhood had transformed into a predominantly (and proudly) Italian community.

The Historic Third Ward was built on rail and water trade, and its fortunes rose and fell with those transport methods. The birth of the American freeway system and growth of the trucking industry led to the Ward’s decline.

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By the 1970s, the neighborhood was neglected and embattled, with an unclear future. Milwaukee rallied around this historic district, and began the long road to reclamation. In the 1990s, the Third Ward stepped up the renewal plan with streetscapes, parking structures and a riverwalk. Today, the neighborhood is a marriage of historic buildings and modern planning.

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With its public market, lofts, galleries, theaters and restaurants, the neighborhood’s renaissance is ongoing. Pendleton is proud to be part of it.

The grand opening starts 8/30/13. Come see for these special events:

- Discover The Portland Collection for Fall 2013

- Introducing The Thomas Kay Collection, celebrating our 150 years of weaving craftsmanship and English heritage

- See the new 2013 Pendleton Home Collection

- FREE Thomas Kay Muffler with purchase of Thomas Kay product

- Enter to win gift cards and Pendleton apparel and home goods

Route 66 on Route 66

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We got word of some happy Pendleton fans this last week when we received this photo of our Route 66 blanket on the front seat of a 1953 Hudson Hornet. Thanks to Anna and Dean for letting us share it, and from their friend Carolyn for letting us know about it. If you missed our post about this blanket and the route that inspired it, just click here.

The Westerley is back, Dude.

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Your favorite sweater is back.

 

The Westerley Cardigan, made famous by Jeff Bridge’s The Dude in The Big Lebowski, is back for fall. This is a different coloration, but as you can see by the vintage ad on the left, it is straight from our archives. We found a mill that could recreate the weight and gauge of the original sweater. We changed one detail; this version zips with a leather pull tab instead of the original metal ring.

We’ll have a contest coming soon, so you can win your own.

Burnside Street/Burnside Shirt

At Pendleton, we have so much local lore to draw on when naming products. We all agreed that the Burnside was a perfect name for this Fall’s new cotton shirt! What else would we name it? It was a perfect name, the perfect name! But then it occurred to us that not every one lives in Portland. So here’s a little background.

Burnside Avenue runs from east to west in Portland, crossing the Willamette River with one of Portland’s original bridges. The best-known stretch on the west side of the river, where Burnside was originally known as “B Street,” is part of Northwest Portland’s Alphabet District. In the 1800s, before the bridge was built, this was a wild part of town. B Street was home to bars, card rooms, and other nefarious businesses that made it a less-than-respectable part of town. The street name was changed to Burnside after David W. Burnside, a Portland merchant, in the late 1860s, but it took more than a new moniker to alter the neighborhood. It took traffic.

Yes, traffic! The bridge, the streetcar and then the demands of the automobile turned Burnside into one of Portland’s more heavily traveled avenues. When the 205 freeway was cut through, Burnside even got some on-ramps (one block off Burnside). Burnside served as one of the boundaries of what Portlanders called “close-in Northwest,” an industrial area adjacent to the river.

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It was home to rail yards, breweries and warehouses. But by the late 1980s, the breweries had closed, and the rail yard had relocated its giant concrete turntable to SE Portland. Change was coming.

Today, Burnside bounds the Pearl District, a prosperous mixed-use neighborhood full of lofts, studios, galleries, restaurants and shopping. But Burnside’s gritty charms remain. You can see it in Powell’s, the City of Books housed in an amalgamation of warehouses joined together to make a square city block of books.  You can also see some original Burnside in Everyday Music, another vast emporium housed in converted industrial spaces. And you can see it in the work of the McMenamin brothers, Portland entrepreneurs who restored an ancient dance hall with a famous floating wooden dance floor and opened the Crystal Ballroom with Ringler’s Pub underneath.

Pendleton’s HQ sits where the Pearl District meets Portland’s Old Town, on NW Broadway, just east of the North Park Blocks. Burnside Avenue is only two blocks away. It continues to carry foot, bus, car and bike traffic through a part of Portland where the newness of the Pearl District rubs shoulders with history, and it carries it all comfortably. What better name could we find for a 100% cotton flannel shirt, peached on both sides of the fabric for softness, bar tacked for strength, and made in the kinds of plaids that say Pendleton?

That’s right. We called it the Burnside shirt, and we hope you like it.

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Amber’s Special: a Princess Gives Back

Part of the Calgary Stampede’s Indian Princess’s year includes a “special” – a contest for the dance style she dances. The Indian Princess is responsible for supplying the prizes and judges.

Amber Big Plume’s Fancy Shawl special was held at the recent Tsuu T’ina Pow Wow.

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This coat in Pendleton wool was the prize for the winner, designed and sewn by the amazing  Janine’s Custom Creations.

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We have been so proud of Amber during her year as princess. It is hard to believe that her reign is coming to an end.

Miss Jagger, YSL, French VOGUE and Pendleton

We hope you remember this post about Pendleton fabrics used by YSL in a grunge-inspired collection that hit the runways this past spring.

French VOGUE’s shoot with Georgia may Jagger showcases these Pendleton plaids again.

So there you go….Umatilla wool in VOGUE, and we love it.

Georgia May Jagger in French VOGUE

Georgia May Jagger in French VOGUE

World Styling visits Pendleton, takes awesome photos!

Japanese lifestyle magazine mono presents a new publication;  “World Styling: A Journey for Timeless Masterpieces,” showcasing international high-quality brands.

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We were pleased to host the photographers and take them on a tour of our Washougal mill.

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We also welcomed the photographers to our design headquarters in Portland’s Old Town.

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We are proud to keep company with world brands like Louboutin and ic! Berlin. The photography is fantastic, as are the products shown, if we do say so ourselves. And please remember that you don’t have to be an international journalist to tour Pendleton Woolen Mills in Washougal WA or Pendleton OR. Stop by and see us!

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