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Posts from the ‘Pendleton blankets’ Category

The Heritage Collection; centuries of beautiful blankets.

With our Heritage Collection, Pendleton has brought many of our classic patterns back to life in our USA mills. Using designs from our archives as old as 1896, we’ve painstakingly rewoven blankets from the heyday of the Native Trade blanket. These blankets display a dizzying richness of color and geometry.

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Canyon Diablo:

This is the newest addition to the Heritage Collection. Fifty thousand years ago the Canyon Diablo meteorite made its mark on the Arizona landscape. Millennium later, pre-historic Native Americans discovered meteor fragments along the canyon rim. Many Southwest cultures since have considered these fragments to be gifts from the gods endowed with other worldly energy. Today the crater made by the meteorite sits on the Navajo Indian Reservation near Flagstaff. This is an Overall pattern blanket.

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Gatekeeper:

The Gatekeeper is an original Pendleton design from 1935. An eight-point star is the central figure. This common design element among the Sioux (Lakota, Dakota and Nakoda) often represents the morning star, gatekeeper of the day, shows the way to the light and knowledge. This blanket is a beautiful example of a Centerpoint pattern – one that contains a central design element that falls within a band through the center of the blanket.

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Evening Star:

The Evening Star design features a traditional star symbol emblazoned on the colors of the sunset. The outlined Venus symbols–representing both the morning and evening star–that inspired this blanket have been found on rock art throughout North and South America. Stories of the Evening Star (the planet Venus) are found in a number of Native American myths. This is a Nine Element blanket.

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Silver Bark:

The original Silver Bark blanket dates from the 1920s and was rediscovered in a private collection. The design features stylized arrow, star, diamond and waterbug motifs in colors inspired by the white and grey bark of Aspen trees against a blue sky. The original blanket was bound in satin, like a bed blanket. Our re-creation has a wool binding (twin sizes) or a suede trim (full, queen and king sizes). . It’s a stunning example of an Overall pattern.

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Turtle:

This has been a favorite in the Heritage Collection for almost a decade. The Turtle Blanket is a re-coloration of an early 1900s Pendleton design, and is one of the longest offerings in the heritage Collection. It pays tribute to the Iroquois Confederacy, one of the oldest participatory democracies on earth, consisting of the Oneida, Seneca, Mohawk, Cayuga, Onondaga (and later the Tuscarora) Nations. The Turtle design was inspired by Iroquois, primarily Mohawk, creation legend. This blanket is another example of Centerpoint design in which three major design elements fall in a row down the center of the blanket.

The Heritage Collection blankets are beautiful, but they don’t stay in the line forever. All are available at www.pendleton-usa.com.

Route 66 on Route 66

Route 66

We got word of some happy Pendleton fans this last week when we received this photo of our Route 66 blanket on the front seat of a 1953 Hudson Hornet. Thanks to Anna and Dean for letting us share it, and from their friend Carolyn for letting us know about it. If you missed our post about this blanket and the route that inspired it, just click here.

Pendleton Salutes Route 66

Pendleton commemorates America’s first completely paved highway with our Route 66 blanket.

Route 66 blanket by Pendleton

Route 66′s 2448 miles of two-lane highway fired the American imagination for sixty years.  John Steinbeck referred to it as “the Mother Road,” the path out of the Dust Bowl during the Great Depression. It was the route of countless family road trips after the automobile took hold of American society in the 1950s. In 1953, it earned another unofficial name, “the Will Rogers Highway.”  Thanks to countless references in books, music and film, Route 66 became a genuine American icon, even inspiring its own TV series on CBS.

Route 66 was decommissioned in 1985, a casualty of the nation’s improved freeway system. On our blanket, the highway’s path still rolls across America with classic roadsters, retro road signs, rest stops, motels and diners. These quaint roadside attractions of Route 66 helped earn it the nickname, “America’s Main Street.”

You can read more about Route 66 in this excellent piece by TIME magazine.

Picnic with Pendleton

It is Mother’s Day weekend, and your plans are probably set. But this beautiful shot of a picnic on a Pendleton Arrowhead blanket got us thinking; why not a Mother’s Day picnic?

courtesy Sunset magazine, May 2013 issue

In Portland, we would suggest the Hoyt Arboretum, or one of our many beautiful city parks.  Travel & Leisure has suggestions wherever you are. And here are some recipes  to inspire you.

Wherever you go, we wish you a happy Mother’s Day.

Pendleton 150 press event for Fall 2013

Last Thursday at the Ace Hotel, the staff wore Beach Boys shirt, the room was full of the most beautiful Pendleton line imaginable, and the showroom was abuzz with press. If you were there, thank you for coming. If you were not, please enjoy a few photos!

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Discover Pendleton!

Last year, we introduced a new throw that’s been a hit with our loyal Pendleton fans. If you haven’t discovered them yet, you’ll want to take a look. At 54” x 72”, these napped throws are the right size for napping, reading, or warming you up while you watch the latest episode of Downton Abbey. They also make spectacular wall hangings.

Throws-all

The Native American-inspired designs are adapted from Pendleton archival blankets. Most of the original patterns date from the early part of last century. Made in the USA in our Pacific Northwest mills, these blankets are so appealing and sell at such a nice price that you just might want them all.

2012 introductions were Legend Lake, Red Mesa, Black Diamond, Standing Pine, Sun Dancer and Garnett Peak (click for larger views).

Legend Lakes  Red Mesa   Black Diamond Standing Pine  Sun Dancer  Gannett Peak

For 2013, we carried over Black Diamond and Sun Dancer, and added Diamond Medallion, Star Signs, Purple Hills and Sawtooth Ridge.

Diamond Medallions   Star Signs

Purple Hills    Sawtooth Ridge

Those that haven’t hit our website yet will be there soon. And by the way, pay special attention to the Sawtooth Ridge pattern. This jacquard is part of a special line we will be introducing soon for Fall 2013.

Exhibit at the Multnomah County Library – Now!

Multnomah County Library

Portlanders revere our central library as the grande dame of a network of libraries, large and small, that serve our metro area.  The Multnomah Country Library fills an entire block in the heart of downtown Portland with its trove of information. The library also hosts several displays on its upper floors.

Local readers will want to stop in to see out this one; Smoke Signals, the Literature and Culture of Native America.  This collection of rare Native American manuscripts will be on display until March 24th, with rare works from antiquity to the present. Also on display will be two Pendleton blankets, including this very limited edition “Bridging Communities Together” blanket, designed by Yakama Nation artist Toma Villa for the NCAI.

AIC blanket by Toma Villa

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The books and manuscripts are part of the John Wilson Special Collections, with artifacts (including blankets) loaned by NAYA. The blankets are lovely, but the stars of the show are the written materials. Please give them a visit.

Hi, Pendleton.

 

We are writing to share a few photo with you, as we are big fans of your blankets. Last weekend our family traveled to Drummond Island in Upper Michigan for fun in the snow.

This is a yearly trek, and we were so happy to be able to join in and surprise everyone this year.

Christie & Nick Cartell

In addition, it’s a tradition to take the annual Pendleton Blanket Photo as every member of the family has one; even the little munchkins have muchacho blankets.

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This all started several years ago, as my father-in-law, Todd Bettes, has quite the collection of your blankets on his own (20+, though when asked for an estimate, he says “Not enough!”) and also loves to give them as gifts.

Nick & Christine Cartell, Tim Bettes &Christina Larsen

My wife and I brought our blankets with us all the way from NYC in our carry-ons to take part in this photo.

The Gibbons Family, Christina Larsen, Ruth Charleton, Tim Bettes, Christine & Nick Cartell, Lynn & Todd Bettes

We thought you might get a kick out of them, and wanted to thank you for making these beautiful blankets that definitely keep us warm in NY, MI and help create fantastic family memories.

All our best,

Christie & Nick Cartell

(Photos by Nick Cartell)

The Gibbons Family with Grandma Ruth Charleton

Six You Don’t Want to Miss

Here’s a list of six special Pendleton blankets that are retiring soon.

1. New Mexico Centennial

New Mexico Centennial

The New Mexico Centennial blanket is designed around the red Zia sun symbol, in which the Circle of Life binds together elements: four winds, four seasons, four directions and four sacred obligations. The blanket has a clean, graphic beauty. This is a limited edition, with very limited availability from Pendleton the Courtyard, located at 1100 San Mateo NE, Albuquerque, NM.  505.232.0088.

2. Keep My Fires Burning

Keep-MyFires

Keep My Fires Burning pays tribute to Native American storytellers, who fill an important cultural role in each tribe by passing on traditions of healing, song, ceremony, dance and most importantly, creation. Storytellers interpret tales taught to them by their elders, and adding their own experiences to create sacred and living narratives that span generations.

3. AICF 20th Anniversary by Maria MartinezMaria Martinez for AICF 20th Anniversary

This blanket, based on the work of the late ceramic artist Maria Martinez , pays tribute to her artistry with Pueblo Indian Pottery. Her black-on-black pottery reached new heights in artistic expression, skill and technique. This blanket honors the 20th Anniversary of the American Indian College Fund, and reminds us that we can only reach new heights together.

4. Sunrise Song HeritageSunrise Song

Sunrise Song uses the brilliant colors of daybreak to represent the Sunrise Ceremony that is common to many Native American tribes. The people gather, wrapped in blankets and facing the East, to greet the Morning Star with dance, prayer and song. Together, they give thanks for another day of life.

5. Sugpiaq Umaq

Sugpiaq Imaq

Sugpiaq Umaq, with a design based on ancestral art created by Kodiak craftsman and artist Jerry Laktonen, celebrates a rebirth of the Alutiiq people culture of Native Alaskans indigenous to Kodiak Island and parts of the mainland. Sugpiaq means “the real people,” and Imaq means “ocean.” The bold rising sun mask represents the Alutiq cultural resurgence and Alaska’s midnight sun. Sea life swims around the sun, while Alutiiq kayaks travel across the top and bottom of blanket.

6. Our Lady of Guadalupe

Our Lady Of Guadalupe

Our Lady of Guadalupe portrays the radiance and beauty of Mexico’s popular religious and cultural image. Since 1531, Our Lady’s icon has resided in the Basilica of Guadalupe, extending her promise of love, compassion and protection to all.

If you need help with tracking down any retired blanket, please call our Pendleton Home Store at 503.535.5444. Our expert associates can often help you when all else has failed!

Pendleton & Weddings

Here at Pendleton, we are so moved when people take the time to let us know the special ways they incorporate Pendleton into their lives. And that includes weddings!

Heather Bayles Photography

Quite a few editorial shoots use us for wedding or engagement photos.  But when we’re used as part of an actual wedding, as we were in the wedding of Zoe Fisher and Matt Johnson (photos by Heather Bayles Photography), we are incredibly proud.

Pendleton played a part in the engagement of Bob and Melba Stork. They were shopping in Pasadena, California on a spring day in 1951 when a store window with Pendleton shirts caught their attention. They looked at several patterns and decided on a red and green plaid as an engagement gift to each other.

Bob and Melba wore traditional bridal attire when they were married on October 27th, 1951, at St. Luke’s Catholic Church in Temple City, California.

Storks Wedding, 10/27/1951

After the wedding, they left for a honeymoon trip to the Grand Canyon, where they stayed in a cabin near El Tovar. Bob set up a tripod to capture a picture of them wearing their shirts as a newly married couple.

Fifty years later, their twin daughters and their husbands organized a golden wedding anniversary celebration for the Storks, their family and friends at the Grand Canyon. This photo was taken near the spot where the first photo was taken; a short distance from their honeymoon cabin.

Storks Anniversary, 10/2001

The Storks have worn their shirts as jackets many times over the 61 years of their marriage. They have been part of travels throughout the United States, and Melba says, “(they) are as bright, fashionable and warm as they were when we purchased them 61 years ago.”

Bob and Melba Stork were married 61 years on October 27, 2012. Bob is 93, and Melba is a bit younger. They still travel, but they won’t be taking their Pendleton shirts with them anymore. They are passing them down to their granddaughter, Lauren, and her fiance, Drew, who will be married this coming February. We will count ourselves lucky to get a photo of the “kids” in these shirts.

The next wedding we’re going to show you took place last winter, when Celeste Grewe and Joshua Bond said “I do” at Camp Creek Campground in the Mt Hood National Forest. After the bridal party wended its way through a snow-carpeted forest, the ceremony took place in front of the camp kitchen for the CCC workers in 1936.

Bond wedding photography by Mike at Powers Studios.

Josh and Celeste met while working at a local snowboard shop called Exit Real World (with whom we did a collaboration some years back). The mountain has played an important part in their relationship, so it was fitting that they were married at 2200 ft elevation.

Celeste had this to say; “We wanted our wedding to really reflect Oregon, and especially to give our out-of-town guests a great feel for the history of the state. Both our families raised us with Pendleton products. Pendleton has a longstanding history with Oregon and the Northwest. It was important to incorporate a traditional element into our wedding, which is where we got the blanket ceremony (plus it was really cold last February). It was also a wonderful way to ask our parents to be involved with the ceremony.”

First, the bride and groom were wrapped in Crater Lake National Park blankets by their fathers. This symbolized their separate lives. These blankets were removed and held by their maid of honor and best man. Then the mothers of the bride and groom wrapped them in a white Glacier National Park blanket to symbolize their shared future.

The Crater Lake blankets were presented to the mothers as gifts.  Celeste said of the Glacier blanket, “It’s a show piece in our home.” She is happy with how the national park blankets hearken back to “…the early part of the 1900s, the national parks, and the CCC and WPA, and the 1940s time frame of the ring I inherited from my paternal grandmother.” As you watch the slideshow (photos by Mike at Powers Studios), watch for other Pendleton items on the guests and bridal party.

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To all of our friends who have made Pendleton part of their weddings, we say, best wishes for the future. May your beginnings be sweet, and may your lives together be wonderful. Thanks for letting us be a part of both.

Happy New Year!

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