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Posts from the ‘Pendleton blankets’ Category

Return of the Sun

IG_08_21_GiveawayImageThe Path of Totality has tracked across the United States, and the moment of total solar eclipse has passed. Millions of eclipse watchers were watching the skies of North American, which will not see another eclipse like this until April 8, 2024. We’re celebrating the return of the sun with an Instagram giveaway. Click here for details: INSTAGRAM

And if you win that giveaway? Consider treating yourself to a Return of the Sun Blanket.

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The traditions and activities of the Iñupiat, today, as in the past, revolve around the changing of the seasons. This blanket, inspired by the artwork of Larry Ahvakana, celebrates the arrival of the sun back to the Arctic and the start of hunting season. The Iñupiat mark this special time with the Messenger Feast—a ceremony where the spirits of the past season’s harvest are ushered back into the spirit world. Today, the celebration fosters cultural pride and the regeneration of traditional values. This blanket is a collaboration between Pendleton Woolen Mills and the American Indian College Fund to honor and reawaken a vital part of Native history.

Return of the Sun was designed for the American Indian College Fund Blanket Series by Alaskan artist Larry Ahvakana. Born in Fairbanks, Larry was raised in Point Barrow until the age of six, when his family moved to Anchorage. He left behind his grandparents, his native tongue, and many of the traditional cultural influences that had shaped his childhood. But these have re-emerged through his art, becoming the basis for his inspired work. He works in a variety of media, including stone, glass, bone, metal and wood. His masks bring tradition to life with mythic imagery in old-growth wood.

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mask image courtesy of the Blart Museum

Larry has been a working artist since 1972. He graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design and the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He also studied at the Cooper Union School of Art in New York. Larry is widely recognized as an educator, instructing over the years at the Institute of American Indian Art, heading the Sculpture Studio at the Visual Arts Center in Anchorage, Alaska, and founding a teaching studio for glass blowing in Barrow, Alaska. His works are included in a large number of major museums, corporate collections, private art collections and as public art commissions. You can learn more about his work here. And you can see all of the AICF blankets here. The sale of these blankets supports scholarships for Native American students.

As for the sun? Welcome back.

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A Blanket for Your Little Star, Born in the Year of the Eclipse

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Pendleton child-size blankets

…can help you celebrate a baby born during the eclipse year, or just wrap your little star watcher in something wonderful. We weave blankets that tell stories, and we want those stories to be told for generations. A Pendleton child’s blanket will warm your children, and their children, and the children who come after—and will definitely be around for the next full solar eclipse in April of 2024!

Star Guardian

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Crossed arrows stand for brotherhood and the setting aside of conflicts. A peaceful evening has come to the prairie. It is time to light the fires and draw together in the warmth of the fire circle. As logs crackle and flames flicker, stories rise on the night air. Stories of bravery and victory in battle. Stories of stealth and bounty in the hunt. Stories of tricksters and their clever magic. As they share their legends, the People are safe and warm in their tepees. Above it all shines Bear, the great guardian of the night skies.

Chief’s Road

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Chippewa-Cree artist Jesse Henderson designed this blanket of the Milky Way, or “Chief’s Road,” exclusively for Pendleton. The Big Dipper and North Star shine brightly. Bear and moose tracks border the sky. Below, rows of lodges represent the children of the Creator and Mother Earth.

 

Sons of the Sky, Daughters of the Earth

These designs were created in partnership with Virginia Stroud, an acclaimed contemporary Native American artist. Every purchase helps support the honorable mission of the American Indian College Fund, a nonprofit organization that helps fund scholarships for Native American students and tribal colleges. Both designs honor a significant Plains indian tradition: Parents place a newborn child’s umbilicus inside a turtle of lizard-shaped amulet that embodies the turtle’s hard shell or the lizard’s quick movement. This guards the child’s spirit to ensure a long, protected life.

Sons of the Sky

ZE786-52008-Sons-Of-The-Sky-MuchachoThe central turtle amulet is surrounded by celebratory stars and rainbows in honor of new birth.

Daughters of the Earth

ZE786-52009-Daughters-of-the-EarthWater lilies and dragonflies surround a lizard amulet on a soothing rainbow that evokes a marsh sunset.

 

Raven Sunburst

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According to a Steilacoom legend, in the beginning, Grey Eagle kept the sun, moon, stars, fresh water and fire hidden from the people. Then Raven fell in love with Grey Eagle’s beautiful daughter. To please her, he turned himself into a snow-white bird, so she invited him into her father’s lodge. When Raven saw the sun and moon, he stole them and escaped through a smoke hole in the house. Outside, he hung the sun in the sky and flew away. At night, he put up the moon for light and kept on flying, carrying with him a stick of fire. Soon the smoke from the fire drifted over his back, turning his white feathers black.

Wild Horses

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Thundering hooves raise clouds of dust as wild mustangs gallop across the valley floor. These graceful creatures epitomize the free spirit of the West, standing as symbols of pride and tradition for many Native Americans. As the sun sets, stars shine against the vivid colors of the evening sky. This design celebrates independence, strength and mobility, all traits of the wild horse.

And so many more

We have so many choices for your young ones. You can see them all here: Child-sized Pendleton blankets   These blankets are 32” x 44”, perfect for a crib or a snuggle. And they are 100% made in the USA.

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Sky Stories: Pendleton Blankets for the 2017 Eclipse 

If a beautiful Pendleton blanket is part of your plan to celebrate and commemorate the upcoming full solar eclipse, we are here with some suggestions! We’ve been weaving blankets that tell stories for over a century, and some of our most beautiful designs celebrate the night skies. All of these wool blankets are made in the USA.

Here are our Sky Stories.

Night Dance

ZE493-53339-Night-Dance-RobeNight falls as dancers gather on the Square Ground for the Stomp Dance, performed by many tribes: Caddo, Seneca, Muskogee, Cherokee, Shawnee, Seminole and more.  Against the dark blue of the night sky, the bright flames of the ceremonial fire rise.  Mother Fire is considered a sacred being who watches over the dancers and receives their songs and prayers. The Chief calls upon his medicine man and speaker to help him lead this sacred gathering. Men take their places in arbors built facing each of the Four Directions. With traditional and treasured turtle-shell rattles fastened to their legs, dancers begin their shuffle and stomp. Strong medicine and the repetitive steps of the Stomp Dance lead them to an inspirited, meditative state. The night echoes with the haunting call and response of their special songs. The Stomp Dance lasts until morning arrives to fill the sky with colors of Dawn.

Full Moon Lodge

ZL494-53137_legendary_full_moon_lodgeThis design was created in partnership with Muscogee Creek artist Starr Hardridge, and is part of our Legendary Collection. This design illustrates the relationship between humankind, Mother Nature and the creator of the universe, whose medicine is love. It acknowledges our place between the sun and the full moon. Full Moon Lodge is part of our Legendary Collection, which honors stories and symbols of Native American cultures.

Pueblo Dwelling

ZD435-53055_heritage_pueblo_dwellingThis is a vintage design from 1923, the heyday of Native American trade blanket production. Dazzling colors and geometric designs tell a story. Arrows symbolize the paths of life and power. Stars centered in squares echo the bright Morning Star, a spirit honored by many pueblo dwellers. This blanket is part of our Heritage Collection.

Star Wheels

ZE493-53049_jacquard_star_wheelsHigh atop the Big Horn Range in Wyoming sits one of the best-known medicine wheels or sacred hoops. This spoked circle of stones was created by Plains Indians between 300 and 800 years ago. Astronomers have noted that during the summer solstice, the spokes of the wheel point to the rising and setting of the sun, and four bright stars, a discovery celebrated by astronomers.

Northern Lights

ZE494-53415-Northern-Lights-FThe Northern Lights are as mysterious as they are glorious. Native legends offer intriguing explanations for these shining bands of transparent color that dance across the night skies. To the Fox tribe of Wisconsin, the lights were an omen of war, spirits of enemies rising up to do battle again. To their neighbors, the Menominee tribe, the lights belonged to torches carried by the manabai’wok, giant spirits of hunters and fishermen that were out spearing fish.  Northern lights are most visible at midnight in the extreme north, and occasionally seen as far south as America’s Gulf Coast.

Gatekeeper

 

ZD485-51109_heritage_gatekeeperThe Gatekeeper is an original Pendleton design from 1935. This USA-made wool blanket is a beautiful example of a Center Point pattern, which contains a primary design element that falls within a band through the center of the blanket. The eight-point star is a common motif in Sioux culture and often represents the morning star, signifying a new beginning with the break of dawn. As gatekeeper of the morning, it shows the way to the light and knowledge of the day.

Stella Maris

ZE493-53247-Robe-Stella-MarisStar of the sea, or Stella Maris, represents the guiding presence of the North Star. As a ‘pole star,’ it shines an abiding light by which sailors have navigated for as long as man has traveled the sea. The graduated palette of indigo, lapis, turquoise and ivory unfolds in a dynamic chevron pattern that evokes the emanation of starlight in the night sky, recalling the traditional craft of Star Quilts. Designer Alyssa Pheobus Mumtaz is an American artist known for her multimedia drawing practice, inspired by iconography of traditional textiles. Her work is exhibited worldwide and recognized by numerous fellowships and grants.

 

Journey West

ZE493-52773_jacquard_journey_westThis dynamic blanket celebrates the pioneering spirit of our founder, weaver Thomas Kay, who journeyed to America from England, arriving in Oregon in 1863. Its design was inspired by a blanket discovered in a 19th-century European mill which included the designer’s notes and calculations handwritten neatly along the sides. The pattern highlights the universal appeal of geometric shapes and lines. The hooked patterns inside the large diamonds are common symbols of luck and prosperity. Its quality and beauty is a tribute to the generations of weavers that have continued Thomas Kay’s legacy of quality and excellence.

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We’re having a gift card giveaway on Instagram over the weekend–starting tomorrow. If you win, which blanket would you choose?

 

 

Blanket Sizes 101: which to choose?

When it comes to blanket sizes, we’re all familiar with twin, queen and king. But what about throws, robes and muchachos? Whether you need a blanket for sleeping, picnicking, camping or as a decorative accent, we’ve got hundreds of options. To find your perfect Pendleton blanket, use this handy glossary:

Throws

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Photography by Marina Chavez,  styling by Suzanne Santo

Smaller than a full-size blanket, and perfect for reading, watching TV or napping. Keep one draped over a chair or on your bed for easy access—and to add lovely color to your décor. Available in merino wool, wool bouclé, cotton and more; sizes range from 54″ x 60″ to 54″ x 72″.

Motor Robes

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Photography by Kathleen Peachey

In the early 20th century, before automobiles had heaters, these travel-size wool blankets kept passengers warm. Today, our Motor Robes are perfect for summer picnics, crisp autumn football games or just curling up with at home. As a bonus, each one includes a leather carrier. 54″ x 66″.

Roll-Up Blankets

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Photography by Colleen Grant

Our Roll-Up Blankets have weather-resistant backings, so they’re just right for lounging on the lawn, outdoor concerts or sleeping under the stars. Each comes with a sling-over-your shoulder carrying handle, too. Choose stripes, plaids, tartans or National Park motifs. 60″ x 30″.

Crib and Muchacho Blankets

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Photography by Grace Adams

Classic Pendleton blankets, sized for kids! These mini blankets are perfect for afternoon naps, stroller rides and fort building. Muchacho Blankets also make delightful wall hangings (details below). Choose traditional wool (32″ x 44″) or cotton (30″ x 40″).

Saddle Blankets

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Photography and styling by Shondina Lee Yikasbaa

Long and narrow, our wool Saddle Blankets are perfect for benches, seats or lounge chairs. 68″ x 39″. 

Bed Blankets:

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Twin/Robe

This blanket size is perfect for keeping folded up at the end of your bed as a colorful accent (and for easy naptime access!). Or, proudly display it as a wall hanging (details below). Fits a traditional twin; 64″ x 80-84″. For X-long twin, choose our Eco-Wise Wool Blanket, measuring 66″ x 96″.

Queen

Fits full and queen beds. 90″ x 96″.

King

Fits standard king and California king beds. 108″ x 90″.

Wall Hangings

We will gladly sew tabs on any blanket sizes so that you may use it as a wall hanging. Tab color will match the blanket binding. For complete details, please call customer service at 1-800-649-1512.

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A traditional Chilkat robe in Pendleton wool

On Earth Day, we published a beautiful photo of Linda Benson Kusumoto in her traditional Chilkat robe standing in front of the Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska.

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To us, it captured the spirit of celebrating the Earth. Linda’s robe is made entirely of Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool, and was handmade by her. She was gracious enough to give us some information on it, as well as some photos of it at celebrations. Along with her Chilkat robe, she sent photos of her family wearing traditional button blankets, also made by Linda with Pendleton wool.

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Here is some background, courtesy of Linda.

My name is Linda Benson Kusumoto. I am a Tsimshian Native, from Metlakatla, Alaska. I lived part of my life in Portland, Oregon, where I found your wool and studied our traditional arts. Benson is my maiden name and is a Tsimshian family name.  When our tribe moved to Alaska, transitioned by Father Duncan (a missionary from England), the individuals were given English names.  My grandparents were given the name of Benson.

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Chilkat robe – I believe that this started with the Tsimshian (my tribe). Our tribe originated from British Columbia long the Nash River, Father Duncan moved half of our tribe to Metlakatla, Alaska.  It is said that the Tsimshian were once of the Nisgaa tribe.  I belong to both tribes as a registered tribal member, my primary tribe is the Tsimshian Nation of Metlakatla, Alaska. Our cities are Old Metlakatla, British Columbia and Metlakatla, Alaska on Annette Island (sometimes referred to as New Metlakatla). My father and grandparents were born and raised on Annette Island, Metlakatla, Alaska.  I was born in Seattle, Washington. With me in the photos are my daughter, Kelli  Jean Coy; my sister, Valerie Benson Callahan; and my first cousin, Coral Sumner Lehtinen.

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Traditional Alaska Native Button Blanket – These are made in traditional colors of red & black, and sometimes in royal blue and/or ivory.  These are designed, created and worn by the Tsimshian, Haida, and the Tlingit tribes of Alaska, especially for Celebration, held every other year in Juneau, Alaska.

Celebration – The button blankets and Chilkat robe shown in these photos have all been worn during Celebration, multiple years and for traditional potlatch ceremonies in Alaska. Here are some images of 2016 Celebration.

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This is a photo of me wearing my full regalia for Celebration 2016.  I also made leggings to match using Pendleton wool.  And I am wearing our traditional red cedar bark hat.

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Here is a button blanket that I made over 15 years ago and it still looks the same today.  This photo was featured in the “Winds of Change” magazine when I won the Executive Excellence Professional award 2012 from the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (www.aises.org).

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All photos Linda Benson Kusumoto, used with permission

Thank you so much, Linda, for sharing your traditions and robes with us. For anyone wondering where to buy Pendleton wool by the yard, here are two sources.

Pendleton Woolen Mill Store in Milwaukie, Oregon: You can stop by the store and see all the fabric offerings and special cuts in person! Or, you can peruse fabrics on the store’s blog and order over the phone. The store does ship internationally.

Woolen Mill Store Blog: Shop Fabrics

Woolen  Mill Store Facebook (for store location, hours and phone number)

A wide selection of fabric is also available at the Pendleton website here: SHOP FABRIC

Happy International Women’s Day

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We celebrate today with a blanket based on Hopi basketry. Stand strong on this day and every day. See the blanket here: BASKET DANCE

Like beloved Pendleton blankets, Hopi baskets are passed from generation to generation and offered as gifts from friend to friend. These intricately woven baskets and the ceremony associated with them inspired our Basket Dance Blanket. Its design celebrates Hopi craftsmanship and traditions. A Hopi basket is offered as a sign of kinship, friendship and sharing. Autumn is the time of the Basket Dance, a harvest ceremony performed by women of the Lakon Society of basket weavers. The women first gather in a kiva to fast, pray and chant. They then emerge chanting and dancing while raising and lowering baskets to the four directions of the compass. Traditionally the women toss many baskets to onlookers afterward. This harvest dance of sharing and generosity ensures rain and bountiful crops the next spring.

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The Hopi culture is built around honorable, peaceful reverence for life and nature. You can read more about their beliefs here: The Peaceful ones & Gift of the Earth

Thanks for the beach image by FireHawk:  Timeless Earth Wisdom

 

Five myths about wool, debunked

Ever decided not to buy a wool item because it was itchy or dry clean only? Good news: Thanks to fabric innovations, wool is better than ever, and some old myths about wool aren’t true anymore. Read on to learn the truth about wool.

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Myth #1: Wool is scratchy.

Admittedly, some wool is softer than others. Rough, scratchy wool exists, but so does silky, fluffy wool that feels wonderful next to your skin. It all depends on quality, the type of sheep, and how the wool is spun. Some of the nicest, softest wool is superfine merino.

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Merino wool (from merino sheep) is famous for being smooth and luxurious. The fibers are very fine—thinner than human hair! It is wonderful woven or in knitted accessories, like the mittens above.

But quality matters: The best merino is virgin wool (not recycled) from healthy, happy sheep (yes, that makes a difference!). Finally, wool is softer when it’s worsted. That means the fibers are long, smooth and parallel, rather than fibers of different sizes in different directions.

For Pendleton’s softest wool, try our 5th Avenue throws. They’re woven of superfine virgin merino and incredible to snuggle up with!

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And men should try our Sir Pendleton wool shirts, made of worsted merino for a refined feel. A mile of yarn goes into each one! These aren’t the itchy wool shirts of the past.

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Myth #2: Putting wool in the washing machine ruins it.

This is true of some wool, but not all. Many people have accidentally shrunk wool sweaters in the washer, not knowing that heat and agitation cause felting. The spin cycle mats the wool fibers together, bonding them. This video explains:

Thankfully, some wool can go in your washing machine! Our Eco-Wise Wool blankets and throws undergo an anti-felting treatment, so not only are they washable, but they get softer with every wash. This treatment prevents the fibers from locking together and felting. Now you don’t have to run to the dry cleaner whenever your wool blanket needs refreshing!

Myth #3: 100% pure wool is better than wool blends.

In some cases, it’s true—a sweater that’s 100% merino wool will be nicer than one that’s mostly acrylic or polyester with only 5% wool.

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Wool sweaters are cozy and comfortable and a lot less likely to pill or fuzz. And a high wool content makes for a wonderfully warm blanket that naturally keeps the heat in on cold nights. But sometimes 100% wool isn’t ideal. Wool socks are more comfortable with a little stretch, so nylon or spandex is often added.

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Pendleton baby blankets are mostly pure virgin wool with a bit of cotton to keep them soft and fluffy (they’re also napped for a cozy feel).

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Myth #4: Wool is heavy and bulky.

This depends on the breed of sheep. For example, wool from Icelandic sheep is rugged and coarse, often used to make carpet. In contrast, wool from the Rambouillet breed—a relative of merino sheep—is very fine, perfect for soft, silky clothing. Fabric innovations have made wool lighter, like Pendleton’s Wool-Lin fabric. It’s pure virgin wool that feels like linen but doesn’t wrinkle nearly as easily. (Perfect for spring suiting.)

Myth #5: Pendleton only makes wool blankets.

grace_adams_10_2015_home_f15-7While Pendleton is perhaps best known for our first product, wool blankets, we began to branch out into apparel in 1927 with our first men’s shirts. Our line has grown to include wool sweaters, shirts, blazers, skirts, accessories and much more. We also use other natural fibers, such as silk and cotton, for comfortable, quality clothing year-round.

So there you have it! Any other questions about wool? Ask us in the comments below!

Thanks to the wonderful Grace Adams for her Brand Ambassador photography.

See more of her work here: Grace Adams Photography   

And follow her on Instagram here: @grace_adams

 

 

Herreshoff Design, Pendleton Patterns

Ed. note: We love getting letters from our friends. Today’s is from Terry, who was an account manager for Pendleton for decades. Now retired, he’s living the good life in Montana. And that includes spending a lot of time in this gorgeous boat.

Here is Terry’s letter.

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Hi Friends,

I was a Pendleton Salesman for 40 years. During that time I was always enamored with the Native American part of our company’s history, how in the late 1890s, Pendleton Woolen Mills started weaving those beautiful intricate Native American patterns into blankets that became the impeccable standard.

I met Greg Morley, who owns Morley Cedar Canoes at Swan Lake, Montana, in 1996 .  He crafted a canoe for me at that time, and I have become very close friends with the family since. Greg Morley worked at the Forest Service out of Salem, Oregon, in the late 60s. Before leaving to build canoes in Swan Lake, Greg was designated to source the Oregon Trail. It took him two years, but he tracked and documented it. He brings that same precision to boat building.

Steve, Greg’s son, has carried on the trade, and built this Herreshoff Design row boat for me. He invited me up to pick out each individual cedar strip for the boat. I brought one of my Pendleton blankets along, and he inlaid the pattern right into the boat. It is a banded Robe from 1920s. You can find the blanket in The Language of the Robe by Robert W. Kapoun on page 53.

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Here is a moody shot of the boat on gorgeous Swan Lake, the Gateway to Glacier National Park.

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All the best,

Terry

All photos by Terry Ball, used with permission.

See our inspiring blankets here: SHOP

And enjoy your weekend.

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Rocky Mountain National Park: Taking a Blanket Home with a #pendle10parks Explorer

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The Rocky Mountain range stretches for over 3,000 miles, from New Mexico to the northernmost reaches of British Columbia.

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Rocky Mountain National Park is one of many national parks in the range; in Canada, Banff, Jasper, Kootenay and Yoho; on the US side, Yellowstone, Grand Teton, Glacier and more.

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Rocky Mountain National park was dedicated on September 4, 1915, and became America’s tenth national park. At 14,259, it was also America’s highest. That has changed in 101 years. Currently, it’s one of the five highest parks in the lower 48, because Denali beats everything, obviously.

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Rocky Mountain is still one of the America’s largest parks, at 416 square miles and 265,769 acres of wilderness. It hosts over three million visitors per year. Motorists enjoy the highest paved road in America.

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Hikers, campers and climbers are drawn by its 35 trailheads, 260 miles of horse trails, and the gorgeous waterfalls that tumble through the park’s almost 500 miles of streams and creeks, including the headwaters of the Colorado River.

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Those are some impressive numbers. But the park’s visual splendor is even more impressive.

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Since a quarter of the park’s land is above the treeline, it offers a rare chance to experience the alpine wilderness. Wildlife is abundant and varied, with 280 species of birds and 60 types of mammals, including moose, elk, black bears, mountain goats, mule deer, the ever-present coyote and the famed bighorn sheep. These massive (non-wool producing) sheep have become symbols of the park. That’s why they are featured on the Pendleton blanket label, shown here on the coffee cup.

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And here’s the blanket:

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Rocky Mountain National Park

Blanket: Colorado’s Rocky Mountain ecosystem rises from lush grassland and forests to sub-alpine, alpine and barren alpine tundra in blue, green, gold and grey stripes.

Label: Bighorn sheep bask in the sunny lowlands, reintroduced after near-extinction.

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Our #pendle10explorer Kate Rolston did a breathtaking job of taking our Rocky Mountain National Park blanket home to its park.

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You can see more of Kate’s work here: @kate_rolston

And remember, your purchase of our National Park Collection helps support preservation and restoration of America’s Treasures.

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Yosemite National Park’s New Custom Pendleton Blanket

 

Each year, Pendleton does a robust custom blanket business for companies, tribes, artists and philanthropic organizations. These are definitely Pendleton blankets, but the entire production run is produced for (and belongs to) the client.

It’s a process to bring blankets to the loom. We have a special department that handles all the steps needed to bring a customer’s ideas to life.  We help to translate design ideas into workable patterns that we can actually produce. We give advice on color and finishing, and create special labels that tell the story of the blanket.

This year, we were honored to produce custom blankets for two of our national parks. You read about the colorful new Yellowstone blanket earlier this summer. For Yosemite National Park, we produced a gorgeous blanket in black, cream and grey.

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This design echoes the iconic black and white photography of Ansel Adams. This revered photographer’s work didn’t just immortalize nature. His work helped protect it, as well. You can read about his life here: ANSEL ADAMS and see some of his incredible work in this interview with his son.

 

Just as we did with the Yellowstone blanket, we sent the Yosemite blanket to three of our brand ambassadors. We wanted to see the blanket through their lenses. Their interpretations are beautiful and surprisingly different.

Kate Rolston took the blanket to the mountains:

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Taylor Colson Horton & Cameron Powell took the blanket to the back yard:

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And Bri Heiligenthal brought the blanket home:

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Three different visions of one beautiful blanket. Thanks to our amazing photographers. Follow them on Instagram for more.

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Kate Rolston

Taylor Colson Horton

Cameron Powell

And the blanket? Of course you can get your own! Right here: YOSEMITE GIFT SHOP

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