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Posts from the ‘Made in the USA’ Category

Star Wars and Pendleton Blankets Unveiled for Force Friday

It was a wild party last night, as this shot from our friend Carrie shows.

10603789_10203657373675476_4087456737516796336_nOne of the highlights was the showing of our unveiling video. Give it a watch!

The unveiling that mattered was the blankets, of course. These works of art were designed by Derek Roberts, the gifted artist behind our incredibly popular NIKE N7 blanket. He’s a lifelong fan of Star Wars, and NIKE was kind enough to allow us to work with him on a project near and dear to his heart.

Here are the details. 1977 is a year that forever changed our perception of space, adventure and heroism. In commemoration, Pendleton has woven each blanket in a limited edition, hand-numbered series of 1,977. Each design is available as a single blanket, or as part of a matched-number set of four for the ultimate Star Wars collector.

1

A New Hope

Inspired by the iconic Star Wars poster. Luke Skywalker begins a journey that will change the galaxy, along with Han Solo, Princess Leia, and Darth Vader.

2

The Empire Strikes Back

Darth Vader and the storm troopers have regrouped after the destruction of the Death Star, with Darth Vader leading the hunt for Luke Skywalker.

3Return of the Jedi

Powering into light speed, Luke Skywalker heads a mission to rescue Han Solo from the clutches of Jabba the Hutt, and face Darth Vader one last time.

4The Force Awakens

If you dare, gaze upon a new Star Wars character from the dark side, with exclusive imagery from the newest chapter in the Star Wars saga.

All4The Ultimate Collector’s Set

Purchase a matched-number set of all four blankets. Available only through preorder and for a limited time.

You should preorder soon, as sets and singles are selling briskly for #ForceFriday. Single blankets will deliver 11/25/2015. Matched sets for the Ultimate Star Wars collector will deliver 10/31/2015.

Pendleton and the AICF: Blankets with a Cause

bannerAICFPendleton has been supporting the goals of the American Indian College Fund for years. To understand why this makes us so proud, please watch this video.

If this is a cause you can get behind, you might want to consider our AICF blankets for 2015 as a way to contribute. Both blankets were designed by Larry Ahvakana, an Inupiaq/Eskimo from Barrow and Point Hope, Alaska.

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Born in Fairbanks, Larry was raised in Point Barrow until the age of six, when his family moved to Anchorage. He left behind his grandparents, his native tongue, and many of the traditional cultural influences that had shaped his childhood. But these have re-emerged through his art, becoming the basis for his inspired work.

Larry has been a working artist since 1972. He graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design and the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He also studied at the Cooper Union School of Art in New York. He works in a variety of media, including stone, glass, bone, metal and wood. His masks bring tradition to life with mythic imagery in old-growth wood.

image courtesy of the Blart Museum

Larry is also widely recognized as an educator. He has instructed at the Institute of American Indian Art. He headed the Sculpture Studio at the Visual Arts Center in Anchorage, Alaska, and founded a teaching studio for glass blowing in Barrow, Alaska. His works are included in a large number of major museums, corporate collections, private art collections and as public art commissions.
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Thunderbird and Whale Crib Blanket

The image on this baby blanket is inspired by the artwork of Larry Ahvakana and the Iñupiat legend of the Great Spirit Eagle. Legend states that there once was a massive thunderbird so large and powerful that it could hunt and carry a whale—the main source of sustenance for the Iñupiat. To honor the whale, the Iñupiat created the Messenger Feast. The ceremonial dancing and feasting prepares the community for the coming year and ensures the success of future generations. This blanket is a collaboration between Pendleton Woolen Mills and the American Indian College Fund to honor and reawaken a vital part of Native history. A portion of the proceeds will help provide scholarships for students attending tribal colleges.This blanket is a collaboration between Pendleton Woolen Mills and the American Indian College Fund.

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The Return of the Sun Blanket

The traditions and activities of the Iñupiat, today, as in the past, revolve around the changing of the seasons. This blanket, inspired by the artwork of Larry Ahvakana, celebrates the arrival of the sun back to the Arctic and the start of hunting season. The Iñupiat mark this special time with the Messenger Feast—a ceremony where the spirits of the past season’s harvest are ushered back into the spirit world. Today, the celebration fosters cultural pride and the regeneration of traditional values. This blanket is a collaboration between Pendleton Woolen Mills and the American Indian College Fund to honor and reawaken a vital part of Native history.

You can see all our AICF blankets here: American Indian College Fund Blankets

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It’s Pendleton Bike Week in Pendleton, Oregon, and time for Rogue’s Pendleton Pilsner!

Pendleton is growling with bikes today, thanks to the Pendleton Bike Week rally. Yes, if you’ve wanted to explore eastern Oregon on your bike, now is your time. There’s so much going on in; concerts, a bike show, a vendor’s fair. There are giveaways at all the local businesses, including the Pendleton Mill Store.

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Speaking of which, do you see that? That’s a frosty bucket of Pendleton Pilsner, by Rogue Ales. And it’s right there at our mill, which is of course attached to our store, where you can pick up your giveaways as you explore the charming town of Pendleton during the rally. Isn’t the bottle a beauty? It’s a serigraphed with a unique-to-Rogue design based on our Pendleton patterns; the patterns we weave in this very mill.

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We are excited to officially launch the Pendleton Pilsner at some invitation-only events at Pendleton Bike Week on July 25th, and you can taste it at any of the Rogue Brewery Ale Houses on that day.

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Many fine things come from Oregon, including Pendleton blankets and Rogue Ales.  Pendleton Pilsner is brewed at Rogue’s headquarters on the Oregon Coast in Newport, with floor-malted barley grown on Rogue’s Farm in Tygh Valley and Liberty hops grown at Rogue Farms in Independence.

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So if you’re headed to Pendleton for the rally, roll on. We will see you there. And if you’re in Portland, we hope you’ll duck in out of the heat and cool off with our new Pilsner on Saturday.

This brew is pure Oregon.

Romance in the Wild and the “Love Me” Blanket

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We are absolutely charmed by this Backcountry feature on Romance in the Wild, featuring our “Love Me” blanket by Curtis Kulig.  This is actually a phone app, but you can view it perfectly online by clicking here. Just click that arrow to the right to see a campfire and more. Go see! It’s adorable! Thanks to Backcountry for the love.

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Happy 4th of July from Pendleton Woolen Mills

Are you gearing up to celebrate America’s birthday this weekend? We hope you’re celebrating the good old-fashioned way, with cookouts, picnics, sparklers and family fun. We will celebrate with two very patriotic blankets; Dawn’s Early Light and Brave Star.DawnsEarlyLight_Frnt

Dawn’s Early Light

“O say can you see by the dawn’s early light.” These words were penned on the back of an envelope in 1814 by young lawyer and poet Francis Scott Key. Key was held captive on a Royal Navy ship as British ships in Chesapeake Bay bombarded Fort McHenry throughout the night. When dawn broke, the fort was still standing, the American flag still waving. It was a turning point in the war of 1812, and the birth of our national anthem, the “Star Spangled Banner.” This blanket, woven in our American mills, commemorates the Bicentennial of that momentous morning in U.S. history. Fifteen red and white stripes and stars represent those on the flag at that time. Each star is shaped like an aerial view of the fort, which was built in the shape of a five-pointed star. Striations and imprecise images give the design a vintage Americana look.

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Brave Star

This contemporary interpretation of the American flag celebrates the patriotism of Native Americans. In 1875 Indian scouts carried messages from fort to fort in the West. Native American soldiers saw action with Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders in Cuba. And soldiers from many tribes battled in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf and Iraq. Five Native Americans have been awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery “above and beyond the call of duty.” The design marries modern asymmetry and vintage Americana. The unique striations, using pulled out yarns, reflect an era when dyes were made from plants.

Beautiful blankets for our beautiful country.

Now go out and watch some fireworks.

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Pendleton Pilsner by Rogue Ales


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Pendleton, OR. May 11, 2015 – Rogue Ales and Pendleton Woolen Mills announce a collision of Oregon artisans with the unveiling of Rogue Pendleton Pilsner. Brewed at Rogue’s headquarters on the Oregon Coast in Newport, Pendleton Pilsner uses floor malted barley grown on Rogue’s Farm in Tygh Valley and Liberty hops grown at Rogue Farms in Independence, OR. Pendleton Pilsner features a serigraphed bottle design which reflects Pendleton’s iconic jacquard textiles.

“It has been an honor and a privilege to work alongside Mort Bishop and his team at Pendleton,” said Rogue President, Brett Joyce. “In the process of creating Pendleton Pilsner, we discovered that we have a lot of common DNA – we are both generational Oregon companies that come from small towns, we both focus on innovation and product excellence, and we share a passion for creating long lasting, enduring brands and products that we love to share with fellow Oregonians and true fans everywhere.”

“Pendleton is really excited to be working with Rogue,” said Mort Bishop, Pendleton President. “With our craft at Pendleton, weaving fabric in Oregon for 152 years and Rogue’ s deep roots in craft beer in Oregon using the finest ingredients from our region, this feels like a very natural relationship. The creativity around storytelling is also something we share and is a fun way to create wonderful new products. We enjoy working with the talented and committed team at Rogue.”

Pendleton Pilsner will make its worldwide debut during Pendleton Bike Week in Pendleton, OR, from July 22-26 and will also be available in Pendleton stores, Rogue pubs, and at select local retailers in Oregon. For more information on Pendleton Pilsner, please visit rogue.com and pendleton-usa.com.

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About Rogue Ale & Spirits
Rogue Ales & Spirits is an agri-fermenter founded in Oregon in 1988, as one of America’s first microbreweries. Since 2008, Rogue has remained committed to saving the terroir of Oregon hops, barley, rye, wheat, honey, jalapeños and pumpkins one acre at a time by  growing its own.

Dear Mom, Happy Mother’s Day from @pendletonwm on Instagram

Dear Mom,

We realize you’ve been doing this mom thing for a long time. From the very beginning, even.

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We want you to realize that we appreciate everything you do.

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Like teaching us the basics, including fingers and toes:

Another day for being thankful. @mama_jbird #HeroicChiefBlanket #thanksgiving #pendleton #family #pendletonblankets #madeinUSA

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on

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And tucking us in at night, even though we are wriggling little minions:

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And getting us ready for our first day of school:

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And making special holidays for us, including muddy trips to the pumpkin patch:

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And helping us build and properly accessorize our first snowman:

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And creating family traditions that involve silly pajamas:

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and great stuff to eat:

Baking cookies on this lazy Sunday. #happyholidays #winter #cookies #baking #pendleton #plaid #tartan #lazysunday @butterandbloom

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on

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We appreciate the fact that your most favorite part of the day is probably our least favorite part of the day:

Nap time with #pendelton. Photo by @thelilpeeps #sleepy #naptime #roadtrip #baby #pendletonblankets #pendletonroadtrip #pendletonwm

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on

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And that sometimes, you have to take a little time for yourself.

Stay in this #weekend with #pendleton #regram from @alliemtaylor #staycation @stumptowncoffee #pendletonblankets #madeinUSA

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on

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We appreciate all of that.

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So for Mother’s Day, we hope you have a little peace and quiet:

Here's to a great start for your week! photo by @samubinas #pendleton #TwinRockThrow #madeinUSA #pendletonblankets #officestyle

A photo posted by Pendleton Woolen Mills (@pendletonwm) on

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A time for solitude:

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A space for creativity:

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And a lot of love, to you, from us.

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Because most of all, we appreciate the love.

Happy Mother’s Day.

Happy Earth Day with Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool®: Sustainable, Beautiful, Responsible

EcoBeauty There are many, many products out there claiming to be green. From the sheep to the shelf, Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® passes strict standards of sustainability and stewardship, verified and certified. This means that if you were to take a Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® blanket and bury it, it would leave the earth better, not worse, for the addition. That’s a nice way to explain it, but we make blankets for you to use, not to bury. Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® products are designed to be delightful to touch, easy to care for and beautifully colored. And they are woven in the USA of 100% virgin wool.

Let’s start with our new Spring throws. These are all about the fun. These fringed throws come with a leather carrier, making this the perfect take-along blanket for your trips, picnics, hikes or sporting events. Best of all, they’re washable, so if your fun involves spills, sloshes, crumbs or mud, you’re covered. Just put it in the washing machine, even though it’s 100% virgin wool. We have two colorations of our classic Surf Plaid, and our new WoolDenim which looks like ring-spun denim, front and back. FringedThrowswLeatherCarrier Also new for Spring, we have washable fringed throws in the beautiful ombre plaids you think of when you think of Pendleton.

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Be sure to check out the classic colors, too. Blocks, checks, plaids; these are just begging to be thrown over the arm of your sofa.

Our throws coordinate coordinate back to our Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool® bed blankets. Here are the solids and heathers. All Wool is a perfect choice for top-of-bed. There is a subtlety to the texture, nothing shiny or artificial about it, and the colors will remain true forever. Check out the bed blankets in stripes and plaids. There are accent pillows, fabric by-the-yard, window panels and more available in Pendleton Eco-Wise Wool®.  Go warm with with traditional plaids, rustic with stripes and heathers, or keep it contemporary with checks. We have you and your bed totally covered. Blake Lively agrees! blake-lively-vogue-cover-august-2014-03_170247646998 So give us a  visit  and see all our colorful ways to be green.

Mill Tribute Blankets by Pendleton: Oregon City Woolen Mills

In 2010, Pendleton Woolen Mills introduced our Tribute Series, paying homage to the American mills that thrived during the Golden Age of Native American Trade blankets. 

tributelabels_2In the early part of the 20th century, Pendleton Woolen Mills was one of five major mills weaving Trade blankets. Oregon City Woolen Mills was perhaps our greatest competitor. Known for explosive neon colors and unique images, their banded robes are among some of the most dramatic designs produced during the heyday of the Trade blanket.

The mill sat at the base of the Oregon City Falls (the “Niagra of the West”) on the Willamette River, just down the water from Portland. This busy location held the woolen mill, a grist mill, printing presses, and other industries drawn to the site by easy river access and the power of the Falls.

The mill was the largest in the West, employing hundreds of millworkers over 30 years of operation. It had a riotous history of workforce unrest, racial strife and community turmoil. It even burned to the ground once.

Perhaps the mill’s colorful history influenced its products, as this mill’s blankets are known for their dazzling color combinations and dizzying geometric patterns. We have recreated six blankets in our Mill Tribute series for Oregon City Woolen Mills. Currently available is Oregon City Woolen Mills Tribute #6, a swirling banded robe with arrowheads in Americana colors. This pattern debuted in 1914.

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Oregon City Woolen Mills Tribute #5 is also available. This framed robe illustrates the prevailing vision of the American West in the early part of the last century: roping, wrangling, bronc busting and pony racing, along with a peaceful Indian village. The original was a children’s blanket.

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Retired blankets in the series include Oregon City #4, a coral-red and turquoise six element robe. This popular design was woven in color combinations that ranged from the garish to the sublime throughout the 1920s and 30s. We think our choice is sublime.

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Oregon City #3 is a banded pictorial robe with eye-dazzling borders and a totem pole flanked by a pair of ravens. This pattern was woven for the Alaska-Yukon Pacific Exposition of 1909, and rewoven in many different color combinations until the 1930s.

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Oregon City #2 is a uniquely colored six element robe in teal and purple. Known as the Dragonfly pattern, our recreation of this robe was a best-seller.

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Oregon City #1 is another pictorial robe known as the Happy Hunting Ground. A hunter overlooks a bounty of fish, fowl and animals, with some amphibians, dragonflies, bees, stars and reptiles thrown in for good measure. The tools of the hunt also decorate the blanket.

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Oregon City Woolen Mills went out of business in 1932 during the Great Depression. Today, plans are afoot to restore its original site, with the Willamette Falls Legacy Project working to restore industry and public access to this beautiful area.

And if you’re wondering, Pendleton plans another Oregon City Woolen Mills tribute blanket in 2016.

Sometimes, It’s okay to be set dressing: Casualife of Canada and Pendleton Woolen Mills

Casualife is Canada’s premiere outdoor furniture company. They recently ran a stunning series of ads using Pendleton Home products to set off their beautiful designs.

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You can see the Diamond Desert bed blanket, as well as the Rio Concho pillows. Here is a little bit better view of our blanket, with its story below.

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We found this treasure in a box of old photographs stored in our mill. Traditional Native American geometric weaving inspired its early 1900s blanket design. Beauty and balance, order and harmony are central to the Navajo world view. In this exclusive Pendleton pattern, arrows, triangles and serrated diamonds are arranged in perfect harmony, a reflection of hózhó, a Navajo word that embodies the quest for balance in life. The four strong stripes illustrate the balance and contrast between darkness and light. Diamonds represent the four sacred mountains that define the four directions and enclose the Navajo universe in the shape of a diamond. 

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This beautiful shot uses the Rio Concho pillows in another colorway, and the Quill Basket blanket.

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The Micmac (Mi’kmaq), a First Nations people of New England and eastern Canada, tell of a long-ago star that fell from the sky into the Atlantic Ocean and crawled to shore. The People called it “gog-wit” which means “eight-legged star fish.” The image appeared on petroglyphs in Nova Scotia 500 years ago. It later became the defining motif on Micmac quilled birch baskets—and the inspiration for this blanket’s central element. Porcupine quills are one of the oldest forms of embellishment found on hides and baskets. The Micmac artisans were so skilled at quillwork, the French called them “Porcupine Indians.” Their quill-decorated baskets set the standard for the craft, which flourished for centuries among Eastern, Great Lakes and Plains tribes. Later embroidery traditions using glass beads, which replaced quills in the mid-1800s, were built upon Micmac techniques and designs. This blanket’s intricate pattern and subtle colors, woven in our American mills, are a tribute to the ancient art of quilled basketry.

Both of these shots are magnificent, and we are proud to be eatured in them. But when we wrote to the photograp[her for permission to share them, they sent a couple of outtakes along with their release.

Wasn’t it W.C. Fields who said, “Never work with children or animals?”

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Work is done for the day, right Mr. Jack Russell? Time to hit the open road…especially since it’s Friday!

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