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Princess Carly in Avenue Magazine

Carly

 

Calgary Stampede Indian Princess Carly Weasel Child has been having an exciting year. Here she is on a shoot for Avenue magazine at the Blackfoot Crossing Historical Park on the Siksika Reserve, where Carly is from. She’s wearing a dress made by Janine’s Custom Creations with Pendleton wool.

We’re proud to help sponsor Carly. You can follow her on Facebook and Twitter as she travels throughout Europe and Canada as an ambassador for the Calgary Stampede.

Blackfern Boards x Pendleton, up close

As we head into the final days of our Surf Pendleton pin-to-win contest, we thought you’d enjoy an in-depth look at the making of the board you can win. So here, in their own words, are all the steps that go into making these fine boards–one at a time, all by hand.

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Making the Pendleton Limited Edition Surfboard

Each Pendleton Limited Edition Surfboard is shaped, painted, glassed, sanded, and glossed by hand in Blackfern’s fabrication studio in Portland, Oregon.

Retro Styling

For the Pendleton Limited Edition Surfboard, a 1960’s era single fin model was chosen.  This timeless retro board embodies the lifestyle of the era; clean, simple, and stylish.  Many of these retro shapes are having a resurgence in popularity because of their versatility in a range of surf conditions.  The board style pays homage to an era in which Pendleton was a vibrant force in Californian surf culture.

The Process Starts

The first step in the fabrication process is to trace out the outline of the board onto a blank, which is a rough-cut piece of foam that resembles a surfboard, albeit not a very functional one.  The outline is cut out of the blank, not unlike making Christmas cookies, and the excess foam is removed.  The outline is then tuned by a rasp-like tool called a surform, in order to hone the perfect curve that will define the finished board.

From Bottom…

The next step is to craft the bottom of the board.  This process begins by power planing or “skinning” the protective outer shell of the blank that protects the softer foam within.  After the skin is removed, the bottom contours are shaped in by removing material with additional passes with the power planer, surform, and finally, sanding blocks.  The single fin model features shallow concavity through the middle of the bottom, blending into a V contoured tail.  These contours give the board a loose and nimble feel with higher performance than would be achievable with a flat bottomed board.

…To Top

At this point it is time to flip the blank over and begin working on the top of the board.  Similar to the bottom, the first step is to remove the protective skin of the blank.  During this process,  I start to flesh out the top contours and the “foil” of the board.  Foil refers to the changing thickness, both from the center towards the rails as well as from the tip to the tail of the board.  It is during this process that a shaper’s ability to visualize in three dimensions becomes crucial.  Knowing where to remove material and in what quantity can be tricky.  The goal is to produce a smoothly foiled board; maintaining volume in helpful areas and removing it where unneeded.

Forming the Rails

After the top has been shaped and foiled, its time to move onto the rails of the surfboard.  At this point the board has a functional top and bottom but with its boxy, vertical rails, it would be miserable to surf.  To form a smooth curving rail, I begin removing rail material in the form of rail “bands.”  Bands are sloped ridges that run the length of the board; thickest at the middle and thinner towards the tip and tail.  By removing rail material incrementally in these stepped ridges, it is possible to produce a rail that changes shape and thickness in a controlled and consistent fashion.  Once the bands are crafted to satisfaction, the board is turned onto its rail and I begin passing a sanding screen over the ridges of the “bands.”  After screening repeatedly, the ridges disappears and a smoothly curving rail emerges.

Finishing Foam Touches

The final steps of the shaping process are to install the slider single fin box and to finish sand the entire shaped surfboard to a buttery smooth finish.  The board is signed off to the customer who ordered it.  I write the customer’s name, the dimensions of the board, and finally “Pendleton Surf Limited Edition.”

Getting that distinctive Pendleton look

The specialized Pendleton artwork is applied before glassing the board.  The two color versions vary on their preparation.  To produce the characteristic plaid pattern, I start off by creating a series of vertical stripes that represent the four primary colors of the pattern.  I then lay out horizontal bands that cross directly over the vertical bands.  I use the same four primary colors and spray through a sanding screen, producing the blended color tones featured in the plaid print.  Finally, I add a band of dark color around the rails of the surfboard to form a frame of sorts.

For the striped version, I tape off three zones of the board; center, nose, and tail.  Within these zones, alternating colored bands of varying thicknesses are laid down to form the distinctive, classic pattern.

Onward to Glassing

Glassing is only achievable in incremental steps, similar to the process of shaping the foam of the board.  Glassing consists of four separate treatments of resin that constitute the glassing process; two laminations and two hotcoats.  A lamination is the process through which fiberglass cloth, saturated with resin, is bonded to the fragile foam core.  A hot coat is an additional layer of resin that helps protect the fiberglass cloth and completely seal the inner foam core.

Laminations

The first lamination occurs on the bottom of the surfboard.  To prepare for the lamination, the top of the board is taped and masked to avoid being exposed to resin prematurely.  A piece of fiberglass cloth is rolled out over the length of the board and is cut so that the fabric drapes over the rails, usually extending approximately 2-4 inches below the beginning of the rail.  Surf Pendleton and Blackfern decals and fin boxes are dry fitted to ensure that no mishaps occur.  The entire surface of the board is then “wetted out” with polyester laminating resin.  A squeegee is used to work the resin into the porous foam of the board and to fully saturate the fiberglass cloth.  The cloth is carefully wrapped over the rails and the board is left to harden or “cure”.

Once the bottom is cured, the board is flipped over and the same process is done to the top, this time with two layers of fiberglass cloth to add additional strength to the deck.  After wrapping the top layers of fiberglass onto the bottom of the board, the resin and fiberglass are left to cure once again.

Hotcoats

To hotcoat the board and finish glassing the board, another coat of polyester resin called sanding resin is applied to each side of the board.  This process is among the most simple of all the steps of surfboard fabrication – resin is poured out of a small pail and then spread evenly over the surface of the board with a large paint brush.  Each side is left to cure before flipping the board a final time to hotcoat the other side.

Hot coating produces a slick, imperfect surface.  In order to make it ready for use, every square inch of the board must be sanded.  Sanding makes the surfboard finally feel like a surfboard; smooth, strong, and perfect.  Many boards are considered finished and ready for use at this stage but the Pendleton boards receive one additional treatment – a gloss coat.

Glossing

The gloss coat is nearly identical to the hotcoat.  The only major difference in the processes is that the gloss coat resin is slightly thinner and is applied to a perfectly smooth, even surface.  As a result, less resin is required and a perfectly smooth surface is formed.  Even so, the entire board is sanded again to make it ready for use.  Successive sand paper treatments, each one higher grit than the last, are used to form completely smooth and scratch free surface.

Finishing Touches

To bring a shine to the finished product, buffing compound is applied using a woolen compounding bonnet.  Finally, a treatment of polishing compound is applied to all surfaces of the board using a polishing pad to give it a candy-like luster.

Launch

Tools and hands have passed over every square inch of this board dozens of times and, at last, this Pendleton Limited Edition Surfboard is ready to ride!  Get ready to catch some great waves!

 

 

“The Pendleton” featuring Luke Ditella for PONYBOY

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We’re just a little bit crazy for these images shot by PO­­­NYBOY featuring Luke Ditella in vintage Pendleton wool shirts. Luke is a surfer (read about him at The Surfer’s View ) who works with Click Models NY.

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As the magazine says, “We were pleased to feature Luke, and his rugged good-looks worked so well for this story.” He models an array of classic Pendleton plaids from tartan to exploded to ombre to check to glen to windowpane, shown tucked into high-waisted vintage wool dress slacks.

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And, he wears a solid wool shirt reminiscent of the Tony shirt we have at pendleton-usa.com this spring.

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Based on the plaids and lengths of the collar points, we see shirts from nearly every decade we’ve been making wool shirts in our nine decades of quality shirtmaking. Check out our Instagrams tagged #pendleton9decades to see some of the recreated shirts we’re doing this fall to celebrate. And you can follow Luke’s Instagram at LUKEDITELLA.

See the full Ponyboy feature here with many more shirts.

 

Surf Pendleton – Win a Custom Board by Blackfern!

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WIN THE ULTIMATE RIDE – A CUSTOM PENDLETON SURFBOARD

To celebrate its surfing roots and the new collection, Pendleton is hosting the Pin-to-Win Surf Pendleton Contest March 17 – April 28, 2014. Grand Prize is a custom Pendleton Surfboard in the original surf plaid worth $1200; Second Prize is a $400 Pendleton gift card; and Third Prize is a $200 gift card. Contestants enter online using their Pinterest account information.

BLACKFERN SURFBOARDS,

A ONE-OF-A-KIND COMPANY

Blackfern Surfboards is a backyard board company based in Portland, Oregon. Started in 2008, it possesses a distinctly Oregon ocean-meets-the-forest aesthetic. The company creates one-of-a-kind custom surfboards designed in collaboration with each customer. Each board is handmade in Portland by local wave-obsessed surfers.

SURF VISIONARY MIKE HALL

Waves off the rugged Oregon coast are like no others on earth. After much frustration with boards that were not suited to Oregon’s choppy waves, veteran surfer Mike Hall decided to shape his own board – and the rest, as they say, is history. With much trial and error, he found a set of design characteristics that perform well in Oregon’s unique waters. After designing boards for a few friends, Mike devised the Blackfern concept – a grassroots effort to put locally made custom boards into the hands of those who venture into the Pacific Northwest surf.

THE MAKING OF A PENDLETON BOARD

In tribute to a time when Pendleton was a vibrant force in the California surf culture, a 1960s-era single-fin model was chosen. This timeless retro board embodies the lifestyle of the era – clean, simple and stylish. From start to finish, each is a handmade work of art – shaped, painted, glassed, sanded and glossed by hand in Blackfern’s fabrication studio in Portland.

  • The first step is to trace the outline of the board onto a blank, which is a rough-cut piece of foam.
  • Next the bottom is crafted, then the top is shaped and foiled.
  • Then the rails are formed and the final shape begins to emerge.
  • The final steps of the shaping process are the installation of the slider single-fin box and a sanding to a buttery smooth finish. At this point, Mike writes the customer’s name, board dimensions, and “Pendleton Surf Limited Edition” on the board.
  • Next the Pendleton plaid or stripe pattern is applied.
  • Then comes glassing – a four-step process that consists of two laminations and two hotcoats.
  • Finally, a gloss coat is applied and buffed to a candy-like luster.

Tools and hands have passed over every square inch of the board dozens of times.

MAKING THE PENDLETON
LIMITED EDITION SURFBOARD

By Michael Hall, Blackfern Surfboards

Buffalo Exchange

A brand builds a base in many ways. Pendleton has been around long enough that we have fans who’ve been shopping with us since the second World War. We also have generations of brand fans who have come to us through vintage shopping.

That’s why were were especially excited to be featured in the in-store publication of Buffalo Exchange.

WEB_coversThey have a nice write-up about our brand history, with photos featuring apparel from our mens, womens and The Portland Collection, as well as some of our blankets.

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And, they have an accurate shirt label guide on the last page.

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We’d like to point out that the “2000s” example is from The Portland Collection. On Menswear, the label you’ll see is more like this one:

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Thanks, Buffalo Exchange! If you are a vintage shopper, please check them out.

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The Wilderness Collective

This post looks back to this past summer, when we helped outfit The Wilderness Collective for a trip to the Eastern Sierras. For this trip, they rode in on horse, braving rain and rocky trails for the reward of some serious fishing and camping away from the distractions of modern life.

The Wilderness Collective’s tagline is “Legendary Adventures for Men.” The gear is high-end, the aesthetic tends towards the curated, but there is no denying that these adventures are the real thing.

Watch the film below. Don’t you want to go?

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The real stars of the film are the horses. They patiently pick their way across this stunning landscape, shod hooves on sharp rocks, to take the Wilderness Collective into seriously rugged territory. These horses definitely earned their Pendleton saddle blankets.

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You can read more about The Wilderness Collective and see films of their other journeys here.

All Aboard with AMTRAK’s Portland Express

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This beautiful car is part of the new  Portland Express, or, as 1859 magazine calls it, “The most Portland train car ever.”

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With an array of makers’ good that include Pendleton wool slipcovers, typewriters, bottles of Oregon rain, chocolates, papers and more, this is one club car you won’t want to miss. Check out more photos here.

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The Portland Express celebrates the  AMTRAK expansion between Vancouver B.C and Eugene, OR.  Details on booking here.

Portland’s Pittock Mansion

Portland’s beautiful Pittock Mansion is open for holiday tours, and as usual, Pendleton products help adorn it. Henry Pittock’s bedroom is done in a northwest theme with the Chief Joseph blanket in sage on the bed.

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The Pittock Mansion is a piece of Portland’s history. Guest can tour the grounds and enjoy panoramic views in every direction. So come take a tour! Details here.

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Lou Doillon via Garance Doré

Here’s Lou Doillon perched on her Chief Joseph blanket from fashion photographer, illustrator, and writer Garance Doré. Beautiful!

Lou courtesy Garance Doré

Carly Weasel Child, our new Calgary Stampede Indian Princess

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Here at Pendleton, we have been proud to support the rein of Amber Big Plume, the Calgary Stampede Indian princess for 2013. We are just as excited about Carly Weasel Child, the 2014 Princess. That’s her, posed before the Canadian Rockies in a coat made from our Canyon Diablo blanket. From the Siksika Nation, Carly is currently attending Siksika College. Her eventual goal is a  Bachelor’s Degree in Mass Communications, to prepare for a future career in journalism or public relations.

Carly is a jingle dancer. Her Blackfoot name, Papainhkkiakii, means“Dream Singing Woman”.  As the 2014 Indian Princess, Carly continues a family legacy, being the fourth young woman in her family to serve as royalty. She says of being princess, “It’s an incredible honor to carry the title of Calgary Stampede Indian Princess and have this opportunity to make a positive impact for my community.  I have always admired the strong women who have served as Indian Princess before me and I am so excited to share the beauty and importance of the First Nation’s culture during my year. I look forward to greeting visitors from around the world to Indian Village during the 2014 Calgary Stampede – the Greatest Outdoor Show On Earth!”

Below, please enjoy some shots of the Pendleton blanket-draped stage, Amber Big Plume saying good-bye, and more shots of Carly in her new role. Our favorite shot is of both women wrapped in their blankets, gifts from Pendleton to celebrate their roles as representatives of the five tribes of Treaty 7, the Indian Village and the Calgary Stampede.

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