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Posts from the ‘home and blankets’ Category

Route 66 on Route 66

Route 66

We got word of some happy Pendleton fans this last week when we received this photo of our Route 66 blanket on the front seat of a 1953 Hudson Hornet. Thanks to Anna and Dean for letting us share it, and from their friend Carolyn for letting us know about it. If you missed our post about this blanket and the route that inspired it, just click here.

Princess Amber Big Plume and the Calgary Stampede

It’s rodeo week in Calgary, and despite the floods and challenges, the Calgary Stampede has been charging ahead! It’s been our pleasure this year to sponsor Indian Princess Amber Big Plume.

Amber Big Plume

Amber, a Law and Society student at the University of Calgary, is from the Tsuu T’ina Nation. Amber has had an exciting reign as Indian Princess, with international trips and appearances throughout Canada. She’s represented the Stampede, her nation, and Pendleton beautifully.

Our role was to provide clothing, fabric and blankets for some of Amber’s extensive royal wardrobe. Amber is affectionately referred to as “the pocket princess” by the Stampede staffers, so even with our petite sizes, we had trouble finding clothing petite enough for Amber. Thankfully, her skilled seamstress, Janine Stabner, could come to the rescue.

Janine Stabner and Amber Big Plume

Janine used Pendleton fabrics for ensembles she designed exclusively for Amber.

Amber Big Plume

Heather Hirsch was the genius behind the needle for Amber’s official overcoat, made from one of our Jerome blankets. Luckily, Heather had just enough fabric left to make a matching jacket for Amber’s sister, Kaitlyn.

Amber Big Plume

Amber Big Plume

The vertical orientation of the design is in honor of the Calgary Stampede Indian Princess and the people she represents. According to our friends at the Stampede, in Blackfoot culture, ceremonial members of the community commonly wear robes with the patterns oriented in this fashion.

A Pendleton Chief Joseph blanket was also part of Amber’s official serape, which was often worn by her mounts (those with hooves and those with wheels) during her numerous parade appearances.

Amber Big Plume

Amberinconvertible

It’s been our pleasure to support Amber. She has worked so hard this year. Though Amber’s time as Princess is drawing to a close, we will watch with pride as she finishes her degree and moves into her professional life. And we hope you will watch this slideshow with pride. It’s full of Amber’s highlights, including an incredible belt buckle, saddle, custom boots and more Pendleton!

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Pendleton Salutes Route 66

Pendleton commemorates America’s first completely paved highway with our Route 66 blanket.

Route 66 blanket by Pendleton

Route 66’s 2448 miles of two-lane highway fired the American imagination for sixty years.  John Steinbeck referred to it as “the Mother Road,” the path out of the Dust Bowl during the Great Depression. It was the route of countless family road trips after the automobile took hold of American society in the 1950s. In 1953, it earned another unofficial name, “the Will Rogers Highway.”  Thanks to countless references in books, music and film, Route 66 became a genuine American icon, even inspiring its own TV series on CBS.

Route 66 was decommissioned in 1985, a casualty of the nation’s improved freeway system. On our blanket, the highway’s path still rolls across America with classic roadsters, retro road signs, rest stops, motels and diners. These quaint roadside attractions of Route 66 helped earn it the nickname, “America’s Main Street.”

You can read more about Route 66 in this excellent piece by TIME magazine.

Pendleton’s New Badlands Blanket!

Since the early 1900s, Pendleton has honored our nation’s parks with a growing collection of distinctive National Park blankets. Each blanket is woven in the company’s Pacific Northwest mills and Made in the USA.

The newest addition to the Park blanket collection for 2013 honors Badlands National Park, designated a national treasure by President Roosevelt in 1929, and home to one of the world’s richest fossil beds.
ParkBlanket_Badlands

Deep forest green, golden sunrise yellow, sunset orange and light earthy brown reflect the natural beauty of the landscape with its sharply eroded buttes, pinnacles and spires. The Lakota knew the place as mako sica. Early French trappers called the area les mauvaises terres a traverser. Both mean “bad lands,” no doubt a reference to the rugged and treacherous terrain.

The story of how these special blankets began is a true American frontier story. In 1893, the Great Northern Railroad completed its transcontinental route two hundred miles north of Yellowstone National Park, too far away to attract visitors. Railroad President Louis V. Hill tirelessly promoted the establishment of a new national park along his rail line in Montana, leading to the establishment in 1910 of Glacier National Park.

Pendleton Woolen Mills was asked by Louis Hill’s father, James J. Hill (founder of the Great Northern Railroad), to design a one-of-a-kind blanket for his guests at the Glacier Park lodges. “In 1916 we introduced our first National Park Blanket for Glacier Park,” says Robert Christnacht, Worldwide Director of Sales for Pendleton. “These treasures are not only warm and practical, and a perfect souvenir from the parks, but a legacy to the entire park system and the expansion of the American West.” NatlPark_poster

In addition to the new Badlands blanket, other parks represented include Yellowstone, Grand Canyon, Yosemite, Rainier, Acadia, Crater Lake and Glacier.

Each blanket bears the Pendleton label signifying its authenticity, along with a special label depicting an image with an important natural feature specific to each park. All blankets are 100% pure virgin wool. The Badlands, Glacier, and Yellowstone blankets are available in Twin, Full, and Queen sizes. All other National Park Blankets are available in Full and Queen only.

Picnic with Pendleton

It is Mother’s Day weekend, and your plans are probably set. But this beautiful shot of a picnic on a Pendleton Arrowhead blanket got us thinking; why not a Mother’s Day picnic?

courtesy Sunset magazine, May 2013 issue

In Portland, we would suggest the Hoyt Arboretum, or one of our many beautiful city parks.  Travel & Leisure has suggestions wherever you are. And here are some recipes  to inspire you.

Wherever you go, we wish you a happy Mother’s Day.

Benny Gold for Jansport and Pendleton: coming in Fall 2013

This was a fun collaboration to work on, and we think you’re going to love the results. Jansport is another Pacific Northwest company, and Benny Gold is fantastic to work with. More information and shots here  and here  and just about everywhere else.

How will you wait until Fall?

San Francisco Chronicle

The Thomas Kay Collection: a Pioneer’s Legacy

photo of Thomas Kay

Pendleton Woolen Mills dates our founding to 1863, when an adventuresome young weaver named Thomas Kay settled in the brand new state of Oregon. The story of Pendleton began earlier in the mid-19th century when Thomas Kay was a bobbin boy in Yorkshire mills, working his way up to weaver before sailing for America to continue his training on the East coast.

In 1863, Thomas Lister Kay traveled by boat, burro and buggy to settle in the new state of Oregon. Using his genius for fabric, Thomas Kay staked his knowledge and integrity on the success of his mill, which soon turned out the first bolt of worsted wool west of the Mississippi. The Kay Woolen Mill was once the largest weaving facility in the West. It still stands as a working museum in Salem, Oregon, a symbol of pioneering spirit and innovative technology.

Thomas established a tradition of excellence by weaving the finest woolen textiles in America, a tradition he passed on to his daughter Fannie Kay Bishop and her sons. Six generations later, Thomas Kay’s descendants weave on at Pendleton Woolen Mills, heirs to his manufacturing legacy.  Every product is still “Warranted To Be A Pendleton,” an homage to Thomas Kay’s original commitment to quality.

Thomas Kay

In recognition of our founder, we have launched a signature brand for Pendleton Woolen Mills; The Thomas Kay Collection.  Inspired by Kay’s desire to weave woolens of the highest merit, Pendleton offers classic and traditional apparel and accessories for Men, Women and Home for Fall 2013.

The Thomas Kay Collection embodies a heritage of fabric craft and discovery. Richly patterned jacquard, tweed and plaid fabrics are woven by craftspeople in Pendleton’s Pacific Northwest mills. Each item has been carefully fashioned to reflect Thomas Kay’s history, marrying proper English refinement with a distinctly American sense of style. The Thomas Kay label stands for 150 years of honesty, artistry and authenticity.

A fitting introduction to the collection is found in this motto from the Pendleton archives: “Where Quality Decides, We Always Win”

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If you’d like to see more about the Thomas Kay line, please visit our Facebook page.

Discover Pendleton!

Last year, we introduced a new throw that’s been a hit with our loyal Pendleton fans. If you haven’t discovered them yet, you’ll want to take a look. At 54” x 72”, these napped throws are the right size for napping, reading, or warming you up while you watch the latest episode of Downton Abbey. They also make spectacular wall hangings.

Throws-all

The Native American-inspired designs are adapted from Pendleton archival blankets. Most of the original patterns date from the early part of last century. Made in the USA in our Pacific Northwest mills, these blankets are so appealing and sell at such a nice price that you just might want them all.

2012 introductions were Legend Lake, Red Mesa, Black Diamond, Standing Pine, Sun Dancer and Garnett Peak (click for larger views).

Legend Lakes  Red Mesa   Black Diamond Standing Pine  Sun Dancer  Gannett Peak

For 2013, we carried over Black Diamond and Sun Dancer, and added Diamond Medallion, Star Signs, Purple Hills and Sawtooth Ridge.

Diamond Medallions   Star Signs

Purple Hills    Sawtooth Ridge

Those that haven’t hit our website yet will be there soon. And by the way, pay special attention to the Sawtooth Ridge pattern. This jacquard is part of a special line we will be introducing soon for Fall 2013.

Happy Valentine’s Day. Some Pendleton romance.

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Exhibit at the Multnomah County Library – Now!

Multnomah County Library

Portlanders revere our central library as the grande dame of a network of libraries, large and small, that serve our metro area.  The Multnomah Country Library fills an entire block in the heart of downtown Portland with its trove of information. The library also hosts several displays on its upper floors.

Local readers will want to stop in to see out this one; Smoke Signals, the Literature and Culture of Native America.  This collection of rare Native American manuscripts will be on display until March 24th, with rare works from antiquity to the present. Also on display will be two Pendleton blankets, including this very limited edition “Bridging Communities Together” blanket, designed by Yakama Nation artist Toma Villa for the NCAI.

AIC blanket by Toma Villa

label

The books and manuscripts are part of the John Wilson Special Collections, with artifacts (including blankets) loaned by NAYA. The blankets are lovely, but the stars of the show are the written materials. Please give them a visit.

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