Skip to content

Posts from the ‘crafts’ Category

Luke Haynes, Fine Arts Quilter, Will Reveal New Work at the Woolen Mill Store

We are excited to invite you to the unveiling of a new quilt created just for us by Luke Haynes. Luke is an artist, and his medium is fabric.

6471836813_112a8cc8c6_o copy

To quote his bio:

­I am an architect turned Quilter. I come from a strong art and design background that informs my quilt work in a different way than is generally associated with quilting. I make quilts to discuss utility in aesthetics and because I like the tactile craft of constructing works out of fabric.

 

1390937629-2674

I am interested in the choices we make to express ourselves to our world. We create an environment around ourselves to inform others how we desire to be perceived. By quilting I am initiating a dialogue between the immediate environments we create for ourselves, and the environments we inhabit.

on my bed #1 Tradition 9 copy

 

Where cloth, what we know to respond to as clothes, linens, drapes and all kinds of covers becomes the language of my work. The cloth becomes the medium that I use to create images and scenes rather than conceal and contain.

The American Context #14 copy

Luke’s works hang in galleries around the world, and he’s been commissioned by private collectors the world over. He’s created something magnificent and astonishing for us. How did this happen, you might ask? Mary and Tawnya, manager and assistant manager of the Pendleton Woolen Mill Store, told us the story in e-mail.

Luke Haynes was introduced to us by Michelle Freedman from Modern Domestic Quilt Shop and Susan Beal. Luke visited our store in the spring and asked if we would be interested in a quilt collaboration. We viewed Luke’s website and spoke with Michelle Freedman. We were amazed by his work and agreed. Luke picked out jacquards with a special project in mind. He was also very interested in our plaid fabric which has been made into an amazing suit he will wear during his quilt reveal!

We can’t show you the quilt, but here’s a view of the suit:

LukeHPensuit1

We are hosting a special event for this, where everyone can learn about quilting with wool, meet Luke in person (he’s delightful) and share the thrill of the reveal. Our quilt is dizzying and beautiful in photos, and we will be thrilled to have it hanging on permanent display in our store.

Yes, we are just a little excited, can you tell? So please join us!

What: Quilt Reveal with Luke Haynes

When: Thursday, October 30th from 1 PM to 7 PM, with reveal at approximately 1:30 PM

Where: The Woolen Mill Store

 

IMG_6399

LukehaynesTeaser

West Coast Crafty’s Susan Beal is coming to the Pendleton Woolen Mill Store!

This Saturday, October 11th, we will be welcoming Portland author Susan Beal to the Pendleton Woolen Mill Store in Milwaukie, Oregon for a book signing. We are celebrating the release of her Pendleton wool crafts project book, Hand-Stitched Home.

 

Hand-Stitched Home Cover(lo-res)

 

Susan is the author of seven books, including Hand-Stitched Home, Modern Log Cabin Quilting, Sewing for all Seasons, Bead Simple, and Button It Up. She teaches sewing and quilting for Creativebug, CreativeLIVE, and (surprise!) the Pendleton Woolen Mill Store. She’s also the historian for the Portland Modern Quilt Guild, a contributing editor at Stitch magazine, and the mother of two little children, Pearl and Everett. See more of Susan’s work, sewing and quilts on her blog, westcoastcrafty.com. Order a signed copy of the book through Powell’s, or visit or call our Woolen Mill Store to order a copy over the phone.

 

Susan-at-the-Woolen-Mill-Store

 

Hi Susan! When did you start crafting, and what were your first projects?

I loved making yarn dolls when I was little, using lots of fabric scraps and lace to hand-sew clothes for them. I started making jewelry in high school, then learned silversmithing and casting after college. But when I was 25 my best friend from high school came to visit me here in Portland and taught me how to sew on a 1960s thrift-store Singer and it was like I suddenly had a new superpower.

I could alter a vintage dress, sew a skirt, or make pillows and curtains for my apartment ten times faster than hand-sewing… it was just thrilling. I made my first patchwork project, a super-simple log cabin block I turned into a pillow cover, eight years ago, and quilting has become a huge part of my life. I find it endlessly inspiring to put fabrics together and see what they become.

 

What was your first exposure to Pendleton wool? What was the first project you made with Pendleton wool?

I’ve always loved vintage Pendleton coats and womenswear, and dreamed about buying a blanket one day. My husband surprised me with the Oregon sesquicentennial blanket for my birthday in 2009 – the beautiful design with Mt. Hood reflected in the lake. I was writing Modern Log Cabin Quilting and thought, wow, I would love to make a quilt for the book in Pendleton wool. I went to the Woolen Mill Store and bought a big piece of sage green Harding and a couple of yards of a beautiful 49er plaid and mixed them into six simple oversized log cabin blocks, then sashed the whole thing with a graphic, understated striped jacquard.

I loved working with the wools, the different fabric colors, patterns, weights, and weaves blended together beautifully, and I realized how much magic and polish top-stitching adds to wool patchwork. Six more wool quilts (including the two I made for Hand-Stitched Home) and a whole Christmas list’s worth of blankets later, my most recent Pendleton sewing project was making myself my favorite version yet of Amy Butler’s Barcelona skirt, in the Beach Boys Surf plaid, just in time to wear it to my Powell’s event last week.

 

And you wore it down to meet with us at Pendleton last week! We loved the skirt, your Star Wars slip-ons, and getting a peek at your crafting journal.

Journal

How long have you been involved in the Portland craft scene? How has it changed?

I moved to Portland in 1997 to go to jewelry-making school and just loved it here, it felt like coming home. I met so many creative people doing cool things, but it was such a small, tight-knit community – there were only a few shops carrying handmade work, and collaborating or teaming up with friends to organize fashion shows or sublet studio space was a way of life. You saw the same people at the fabric store in the afternoon and then out at night, so new ideas just came to life after a couple of good conversations! My friends Kate Towers and Holly Stalder opened their shop, Seaplane, on Belmont and I brought in some of my skirts, handbags and jewelry on consignment. I got home a few hours later to the best message from Holly that someone had tried on one of my skirts and loved it so she bought it, and wore it out of the store! That was the best feeling ever.

I started selling my work at little neighborhood craft fairs with friends like Cathy Zwicker and Torie Nguyen, who now own the beautiful Crafty Wonderland  flagship store downtown – and put on a huge event with hundreds of vendors and thousands of shoppers twice a year. It’s just kind of amazing to see how much the whole community has grown, and how much support there is from other craft artists, shops, and customers, whether you are just getting started or have been doing this for years.

HSHPg.27           HSHPg.32

 

Who are some crafters you love, and why?

-Rebecca Pearcy’s Queen Bee bags and hand-designed textile line – her work is beautiful.

-Cathy Zwicker  and Torie Nguyen ,who co-own Crafty Wonderland, both make gorgeous jewelry and accessories.

-My Portland Modern Quilt Guild  friends like Michelle Freedman, Petra Anderson, and Monica Solorio-Snow  are so inspiring – their quilts, fabric design, and visual work are all lovely.

-Heather Davidson of PMQG and her husband Chris own a fantastic vintage furniture business, Remnant, and she does stellar upholstery using Pendleton fabric, too. I’m lucky to own a beautiful mid-century chair she redid in Rancho Arroyo in black!

 

What’s next for Susan Beal?

After the Woolen Mill Store party, I’m going to Quilt Market and very excited to do a couple of events there with my publisher for Hand-Stitched Home! Then I’m teaching both log cabin and wool quilting at the Menucha Retreat Center in the Columbia River Gorge, and speaking at Quiltcon in Austin, Texas, early next year, and I’m working on projects for a new craft book for 2016.

On a personal note, I also have some serious Halloween sewing to do – my daughter Pearl requested a cowgirl costume and my son, Everett, really wants to be Emmet (from the LEGO Movie), so I need to get on that before my daughter changes her mind for the third time! This is her sixth Halloween and I’ve learned that the trick is catching her in between costume ideas #2 and #3.

Banner

 Susan is so much fun in person. We hope you’ll enjoy meeting her this Saturday, October 11th, and the Pendleton Woolen Mill Store. She’ll be hanging out there from 1 to 5 PM, and she’d love to chat and sign your books. You can see the crafts projects like those above, plus more, in person!

back-of-store

Thomas Kay Gear, Made in the USA

Thomas-Kay-Signature

As part of this year’s Thomas Kay Collection, we are offering select gear that echoes our founder’s craftsman ideals. The gear in the Thomas Kay Collection has been carefully chosen to reflect American standards of craftsmanship and integrity.

TK_Lighter_open

For nearly eight decades, Zippo® has been manufacturing lighters in Bradford, Pennsylvania. Their patented windproof lighter is an American icon in peace and war. For the Thomas Kay Collection, we offer this 1941 Replica™  in brushed chrome with a vintage Pendleton logo engraved on the side: “Where quality decides, we always win. Pendleton Woolen Mills.”

TK_Leatherman_Box-and-bag

We didn’t go far to find the next product; the Thomas Kay Leatherman® tool is made by the Oregon company that has been manufacturing this indispensible tool since 1983. A stainless steel Leatherman® is 18 handy tools in one; knives, pliers, scissors, screwdriver, corkscrew and more. Our version is engraved with our vintage tilted logo, and presented in a Pendleton jacquard wool pouch.

TK_CampStool

The Thomas Kay Camp Stool is also made in Oregon by the hands-on craftspeople at Wood and Faulk. This ingenious design combines hardwood, Pendleton wool and rugged leather. It’s is comfortable, collapsible and easy to carry, thanks to the detachable strap. You can see the manufacture and some really beautiful shots over at their blog.

We’re proud of this group of American-made products, and of the heritage that inspired them. Remember, “Where Quality Decides, We Always Win.”

photo-of-Thomas-Kay

Father Winter

As the holiday nears, it’s time for a visit from Father Winter.

2012 Father Winter

 Father Winter is a distinctly American take on Father Christmas.  His robe is cut and sewn of Pendleton wool in the Evening Star jacquard , with natural fur and feather trims.  He carries a staff and bag with woodland accents and has an incredibly soft white beard.  We think that he has a little more rugged mystery than the standard Santa; a sense of dark  forests with snow underfoot and stars overhead.

2012’s Father Winter takes his place beside the 2011 Father Winter.

2011 Father Winter

Each and every Father Winter is handmade for Pendleton by Anita Baptiste, an artist in Chandler, Arizona.  Ms. Baptiste works with the rich colors of our wool to create a harmonious blend of natural elements.  She’s planning a beautiful Father Winter for next year, which we will introduce this summer.

So hang those stockings and light those candles.  And though Father Winter looks like he might prefer pemmican, go ahead and leave him some cookies.  Some traditions never need changing.

Stitch magazine: creating with fabric + thread, and Pendleton, too!

The latest issue of Stitch has a “Spotlight on Wool,” and Pendleton and our Woolen Mill Store are featured all through it! If you’ve ever had any questions about how to sew with wool, this issue of Stitch has the answers. From the rich history of American wool fabrics, to wool quilting and making your first wool coat, the Spotlight on Wool issue is full of project ideas, information and inspiration.

We’re lucky to have four Portland wool experts featured in this issue:

Read more

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 116 other followers